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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

    Post

    In all the years I've kept bees I've never worn out a veil. Thrown a couple away, but never worn one out.

    Yesterday, working my bees, I knew I had to deal with a bad hive, so I went in and got my new, never worn, pristine, purty Jungle Hat and veil. I strapped on the veil, buttoned the cuffs on my long-sleeved shirt and went to work. Wore the veil for the better part of three hours---possibly the longest stretch that I have ever worn a veil.

    Not a single sting above the wrists--no ankle biters, nobody crawling inside the cuffs and up the arms to the armpit--nothing.

    I did get probably a dozen stings to the back of my hands. Today I can make a fist with either hand, something that I cannot ordinarily do. Old Arthur must be allergic to bees.

    Jeez I wish bee stings could remedy some of the other inconveniences of hyperannuation. If they did, honey would sell for a nickle a gallon.
    Ox

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    I can't say I've exactly worn a veil out but I've had the mice chew holes in the nylong part at the top. Exciting if you don't catch it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Stronghurst,Illinois
    Posts
    168
    Had an old friend that kept bees along with his father back in the 20s . They had a guy show up that a doctor had sent to them to get bee stings for treatment of arthritus . He had to have someone drive him there at first and used 2 canes to walk with .

    After several months of sting treatments he could drive himself as well as walk a lot better .

    Drifter

  4. #4

    Post

    I have a shoulder injury from my days on the Leavenworth Police Department......it is a constant ache....last week when I installed my packages I got stung three times on the neck (under my veil) but for a few days my shoulder did not hurt (first tiem in two years now) I wonder.............

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    I got stung on the shoulder where I get a knot in the muscle when I drive (from an old bicycle injury). It was much better for a couple of months, but finally went back to "normal". It was nice relief, but temporary. I can't reach it very well, or I'd hold a bee there to sting me again. I don't think I can get anyone else to do it for me. I'm the beekeeper.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

    Post

    Yes, everything I ever read about bee sting therapy implies that it must be an ongoing treatment. Still, a bit of relief is nice and there is always the possibility that once relieved of the pain the muscles will heal themselves.

    As for shoulder and neck applications, I would suggest a simple wire tea strainer with a handle. Drop it over a few bees, slide a cardboard under it to trap the bees inside, then when the bees are buzzing against the wire slap the strainer on the spot you choose. I ga-ron-tee that you will get results, perhaps even some unintended results.

    For spot applications a cigar tube would work well. No telling what the bee-therapy professionals would advise. Maybe there is one lurking here. Probably something like haemostats and wing-holds.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Wink

    I also have shoulder pain from my Military Service days and have wanted to apply stings there to see what the results would be. But I can't reach the spot. Anyway, I recommend some mild caution on the neck slap I had one going for the tender spot on the side of my neck while mowing last year and tried to quickly swat her off. I got stung instead. I was never sure if it was the sting or my slap, but I ended up with a headache and a "crick" in my neck for days. Ouch!!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Harpers Ferry, WV USA EEUU
    Posts
    47

    Post

    Ox et als.,

    You might want to check out Pat Wagner of Marlboro, Maryland. She is a former MS patient who was literally on death's doorstep until her mother asked a neighborhood beekeeper to sting her. Pat spoke at our beekeepers' association meeting last year, and it was an amazing story. Normally I am highly skeptical of anybody claiming anything about miracle cures, but the things Pat said, and the things her husband said were very intriguing. They now keep an observation hive hooked up to the house so they can get bees for stings all winter long without breaking a winter cluster.

    Pat is a good public speaker -- very matter of fact and plain-spoken -- and she likes to talk to beekeepers' groups, because they already know a lot that the general public does not. She became known in the Baltimore-Washington DC area as the "Bee Lady" after a DC TV station did a special report on her recovery. She will put bees to stinging people that come by her house. The first thing she will tell you is that she is not a doctor or nurse, but she has educated herself to the point that some of the medical experts check in with her.

    Pat's husband showed us the tools they use, and it looked like a reverse clamp pair of medical tweezers about 6-7 inches long. The tweezers gently hold the bee's head or thorax (better) and with that long a pair of tweezers, you can direct a sting on yourself pretty much. You can get one from a hospital supply company easily.

    Ox, as for the 'other problems of hyperannuation' , Pat did relate that a neighbor had an old dog who was dragging around the house, couldn't even climb the steps to the second floor. They applied stings to the backside of said dog, and he was considerably rejuvenated. That dog spent the rest of the week running all the way up to the third floor. Apparently, the location of the sting is important to the function you want improved. I will leave it to Pat to relate her experiences about what stings in what places make what things better.

    One of our older members is a 300-lb man who has constant numbness in his hands from his diabetes. With his permission, Pat applied a sting to his elbow area, and within minutes, his hand numbness was gone, he said himself.

    But as far as Arthur Itis and MS go, the evidence is strong that apitherapy can work wonders for many people.

    Pat Wagner's e-mail is beelady@olg.com. Her website is http://www.olg.com/beelady/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    fall city Wa USA
    Posts
    112

    Post

    I swear by it. I get stung on purpose every few months. Along with the guclosimine I feel 18 again. Only 45 but I used my body in athletics pretty hard.

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