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  1. #101
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i know there is a hybrid poplar that will grow about 10 foot a year.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    The hybred popular are a thing you do not want. Those things send shoots up everywhere from the roots. It is a hybred between silver popular and lumbardy popular. The tulip popular or yellow as it is called when talking logs is a good yielder. Silver and lumbardy are grown from cuttings or those shoots that the silver produces. The hybreds we planted for cuttings got to 30 feet in 4 years. It send out enough shoots the second year that we had no need to take cutting. We cut the trees down about 6 years ago and we are still digging shoots out.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >One question, do bees work the honey locust with the long spikes? We have determined that they do work the black locust (with small thorns), but how about the other?

    I took a long look last weekend at our black locust and found that I was mistaken, there are no thorns on it as I thought I had seen before.

    Sorry if I confused anyone.

    Bill

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    Black Locust will root if I plant the shoots? That's the one with the sweet smelling white clusters of flowers, right? I tried growing some from seed, but haven't done well so far. If I can root cuttings, that would be great. I suppose spring would the best time to try that?

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    As I understand it, you can plant a piece of green wood and it will sprout and grow. I would say that spring would be best for that.

    Bill

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Montezuma, GA USA
    Posts
    69

    Post

    I didn't read all the posts. Has anyone mentioned the Chinese Tallow Tree? It is a great source of nectur here in Georgia. I had a couple in my yard and have raised ~100 seedlings to plant on some land. It grows quickly, so you could have an estabilished grove in ~3 to 4 years. Be prepared to cut underneath the trees though, if not they will take over.

    Best of luck
    Mark

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Catonsville, MD. USA
    Posts
    252

    Cool

    Chellesbees;

    I, too, have had absolutely no luck propagating Black Locust seeds. I've tried stratifying, scarifying, and attempted geminating in light and dark, heated soil but no good. I however as you mentioned, have had luck transplanting the small trees that grow from the mother tree. Bee aware that these young trees do not grow from seed but from VERY long underground "rootlings" sent out from the mother tree. These thin to medium rootlings are fairly near the surface (I've found usually less than 4"). These rootlings grow as far away as 100 feet from the mother tree (from my observations). It helps when digging up a small sapling to get as much of the connecting rootling on either side of it as is feasable. This will increase the survival rate of the saplings.

    Bill, the Black Locust DOES have thorns (>1")on the new growth wood but not on the old. I guess they evetually fall off.

    Thanx.

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    Black locust have the thorns on both sides of the leaf structure. Next time a limb falls out of it look it over. The next year when a limb grows where the leaf was before it pushes the thorn off. Yes you can stick limbs in the soil and keep the soil damp and that fall those that root can be transplanted. Grow them one season where you want them then cut them off about 3 inches above the soil in the spring before they start leaving out. Select one of the shoot that sprout from the stump and train it up straight. We do this because the limb is so crooked and hardened off. We get good staight trees for your yard this way.

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >Bill, the Black Locust DOES have thorns (>1")on the new growth wood but not on the old. I guess they evetually fall off.

    >Black locust have the thorns on both sides of the leaf structure. Next time a limb falls out of it look it over. The next year when a limb grows where the leaf was before it pushes the thorn off.


    Thanks for clearing up the mystery guys, I thought they had em'. I'll be transplanting some next spring into a protected area.

    Bill

    Thanx.


  10. #110
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Hillbilly,
    Don't you go off and dissapear on us, you are too valuable of a resource for us to loose. Thanks,

    Bill

  11. #111
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Heyburn, Idaho, USA
    Posts
    48

    Post

    We have a lot of russian olive in this area. They produce an olive with very little flesh. The magpies eat them during the winter then spread them all over, infact we consider them weeds, nasty thorns but in the spring they have a lot of small fragrant flowers which the bees love. These trees bloom toward the end of the dandylions. I would be happy to collect some seeds if anyone would be interested. I have a few seedlings that I could dig up and send. I don't think you have magpies in the midwest or east coast so you shoulden't have the problem that we have.

    Best wishes,
    Earl White

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Exclamation

    You guys/gals are valued by me. I have been spending time in the other forums. As to the Russian olives, many different birds eat them. When the Black birds/starlings migrate south they fill ours if we have not picked them clean. Pigeons also eat them later in the year when food gets hard to find. The bees do love them. So with me it is how many thousand do you not want. I dug up over a hundred this spring. They do have thorns but not many. We do not use protect from them when we pick the seeds. If you want some sent your way just ask I just have to warn you how they can take over.

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i'd like to discourage the use of alien species in our environment,as mentioned this stuff can really take over and crowd out native plants.a good native alternative to russian olive is sumac,the bees and birds love it and it's native and really beautiful.

  14. #114
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Is russian olive the same as autumn olive or is the russian a slightly larger tree versus a bush? I think autumn olive was originally brought from russia as a plant to provide forage for critters. It was widely used around here by the department of natural resources. They gave up on it years ago as it is highly invasive and doesnt provide anywhere near the nutrional resources as some other native plants. One positive is that it does make a bunch of honey......honey which is water white but taste like sh**!!!


  15. #115
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    They are one and the same to a point. It is like calling apple trees the same. Autum Olive is a silver leaf cultivar. They are the russian olives we have. About 15 years ago NC highway department was buying them by the millions. They can take alot of abuse and air pollution and thrive. If it was not for them self seeding everywhere they would be great plants.

  16. #116
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Years back I bought through the County Extension Service packages of plants that the State of Kansas was selling for windbreaks and wildlife shelters.

    There were olives (silver with no thorns), sandplums, cottoneaster, dogwood, and more that I can not remember now. They also sold White and Austrian Pines, pecan, Western Redcedar, and other trees for windbreaks.

    You might want to check with your local extension office and see if you have any programs available to you.

    Bill

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Spruce Pine, North Carolina
    Posts
    21

    Question

    Hi Folks,
    Can anyone tell me why Black Locust only blooms sometimes?
    It has been four years since the ones on my place have bloomed. The year before,the bloom was so heavy that the limbs drooped.

    Yellow Popler and Locust are our main sources for honey here in the mountains of NC. We have some Sourwood later.

    As for Black Locust,if you get a thorn stuck in your skin,a small tip usually breaks off and if you don't get it out,within 4 hrs. you will see blood poisoning start to set in. This is from personal experiance.

    Kindest regards,
    Jack

  18. #118
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    I've always figured that the sap is poisonious on the black locust thorns. Because when I get stuck on an old one I don't have a problem but a stick from a fresh thorn from the tree always swells up badly. It doesn't act like an infection (blood poisoning), but rather like actual poison.


    [This message has been edited by Michael Bush (edited November 22, 2003).]

  19. #119
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Catonsville, MD. USA
    Posts
    252

    Cool

    John B.;

    I noticed the same thing, B. Locust not blooming or not blooming with the same intensity year after year. In June of '02, I got an answer to this from a researcher on our Eastern Shore in Maryland. His response and contact info is shown with his answer:

    "Black Locust is one of those trees that blooms in abundance every other year, similar to apples.

    Michael S. Embrey
    Eastern Shore Apiary Program
    Dept. of Entomology (WREC)
    P.O.Box 169, 124 Wye Narrows Drive
    Queenstown Md. 21658
    Phone (410)-827-8056, Mobile (410)-924-0028
    Fax (410)-827-9039
    E-mail: me15@umail.umd.edu"


    For us in Maryland, the "off" year was '02 which means that '03 was an "on" year. However, with so much wind and rain last spring, I can't swear to it from my observations.

    Hope this helps.

  20. #120
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Spruce Pine, North Carolina
    Posts
    21

    Post

    John Sheets,


    Thanks for the reply. I will look into this.

    "Black Locust is one of those trees that blooms in abundance every other year, similar to apples.

    JB

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