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  1. #221
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lenexa, Kansas
    Posts
    445

    Post

    Yes, the Plains Indians DID burn. They used to send messages to any friends they may have had down wind.

  2. #222
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >They used to send messages to any friends they may have had down wind.

    Yeah, like.... RUN!!!
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  3. #223
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Greencastle, Indiana
    Posts
    57

    Post

    I don't know if this was asked before but how much of a honey flow would you expect from a few acres of wild raspberry ,wild rose and wild black berry/dewberry ?

  4. #224
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Gum Bottom, La, USA
    Posts
    90

    Post

    Is the mimosa tree good for bees.

  5. #225
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Contrary to my previous posting, I do not recomend that you burn off your clover field.

    I lost my hubam field due to overcrowding last year and was concerned that my yellow clover had too much competition from the broam that came back after planting the field to clover. The weekend before Easter I burned my field, the clover was 6 to 10 inches tall in places. It must have been too late to burn as I have no bloom in that field this year. The plants are growing well and so is the broam. I guess we'll have some feed for the cattle and horses.

    The CRP fields we burned all have both alfalfa and clover blooming. Somethings just don't add up.

    I have a beautiful field of hairy vetch blooming! I'll get pictures up in the near future. The bees are going crazy! I'm adding a super about every two weeks. This is a great year for honey.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  6. #226
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    S.E. Oklahoma
    Posts
    337

    Post

    <Is the mimosa tree good for bees.>

    I've been curious about that myself. The bees are working them over heavy at first light then tapering off through the afternoon. Searched the forum and found several mention mimosa but can't find many opinions as to quality/quantity. They "seem" to be working hard fighting through the fringe part of the flower (with the pollen) to get at the center of the flower presumably for nectar. Whole yard is fragrant with the smell.

  7. #227
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    How about butterfly bush--around here it is just starting to bloom, the flowers are almost flourescent orange and the seed pods look like miniature canoes. The bees really go to them and since they are perrenial and self seeding no work involved. White sumac is really good also and the goldenrod plants of many species are abundant here but the bees almost totally ignore them for some othe more attractive nectar source. In the fall the wild asters are are really appreciated by my bees. I have tried buckwheat and the bees ignored it, whatever suits them best is where they go in my opinion.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  8. #228
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Palestine, Tx. 75801
    Posts
    485

    Post

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    Lacy Phacelia
    Phacelia tanacetifolia (A)

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    Type: Annual—lives just one year. Grows quickly, blooms heavily, then dies with frost.
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  9. #229

    Post

    BILL:

    I think if there was clover already in the green when you burned then you burned too late in the season. I read that cattle will eat the clover down too much and kill it eventually - better to cut it and feed as hay.

    Your honey flow is going much better than mine this year. My scale hive gains only around a pound a day if at all. Only a super or so per hive. Too dry for me in April and too wet in May methinks.
    BEE-L snob since 1999
    What's a swarm in April worth?

  10. #230
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Clatskanie, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    93

    Post

    Phacelia tanacetifolia
    Common name(s): Lacy Phacelia
    Genus: Phacelia Species: tanacetifolia Variety: Cultivar:
    An annual wildflower of sizable portions that grows under creosote and other desert shrubs in the Mojave, Quercus dumosa, Q. Douglasiana and Juniperus californica and other dryland trees in the California interior, and drier sections of Southern California. On of the many plants that you cannot figure out how exists in such a harsh site looking succulent and full of blue flowers in spring. Come back in July and there is nothing there, it disappears back into the earth. Give sun to part shade and a bush or tree to hang around, good drainage and this plant may work for seeded in spring color.

  11. #231
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    MS
    Posts
    25

    Post

    What about pecan trees?
    I noticed my wild hive working mine this year to the point I thought there was a swarm in the tree.
    I have not found it listed as a pollen or nectar producer.

  12. #232
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    I must admit that I've never seen honeybees working pecan tree blooms.

    As to the mimosa question, I've seen honeybees working mimosa and bottlebrush. Don't know what or how much they were getting from it though.
    Rob Koss

  13. #233
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Lakewood Colorado
    Posts
    60

    Post

    I did notice on one of the lists that bees work bind weed has anyone ever seen this? It seems to me this might be the one good thing about the nasty stuff.
    Matt

  14. #234
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I've seen them on bind weed. I don't know what they get from it though. I wish I could remember what time of day it was, that could tell me wether it was nectar or not.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  15. #235
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    342

    Post

    In July and August the anise hyssop (purple agastache) is covered with bees. This plant is a prairie native, grows from seed and spreads easily and is gorgeous. I sell scads of it at my native plants nursery. They also love lavender. There is a hardier one that we can grow in WI.

    I also overseed all of my lawn area and meadows with white dutch clover. That is "lawn sacrilege" here in the midwest, but my lawn looks better than anyones around here and I don't fertilize.
    Buy locally, buy only humanely raised animals, eat in season, keep bees!

  16. #236
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    Mabe
    We had a long discussion about anise hyssop on here last year. Have you ever started it from seed?

  17. #237
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Lakewood Colorado
    Posts
    60

    Post

    I would guess nectar from the shape of the flower and the little interaction I have had with it ripping/digging it out of the ground.

    Mabe, funny you mention lavender I just planted some in front of my hives. I just planted about 400 square feet of dutch white clover in my back yard good ground cover if nothing else.
    Matt

  18. #238
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    342

    Post

    David,
    Yes, you can easily start agastache from seed...in fact, once you get it, it reseeds itself EVERYWHERE! I have about a million plants in my gardens (not where they need to be). You can easily pull up the seedlings, but I hate to compost bee plants. Will be slowly moving them all to my meadow.

    Matt,
    We lived in Colorado for years...the white dutch clover really helps get the grasses established. In Lakewood you probably have a real lawn. In Black Forest we grew the xeriscape grasses with the clover. Hint - trim back your lavender a few times until it thickens up and then let it bloom in July-August.
    Buy locally, buy only humanely raised animals, eat in season, keep bees!

  19. #239
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    Mabe
    Can you tell us when the best time to start Agastache from seed is (Fall or spring) and a good cheap source for seed? also ground prep, etc. Thanks!

  20. #240
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Lakewood Colorado
    Posts
    60

    Post

    I kept my eyes open this weekend and indeed bees in the bindweed flowers and they could be getting pollen for sure lots of white power.

    Mabe,
    Yes I have a "real" lawn. I want to get rid of the bulk of the bluegrass in favor of perennials. The clover was a long strip that nothing much was growing on in my back yard close to the bees. Thanks for the advice with the lavender will you remind me next year please?
    Matt

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