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  1. #201
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Glad I could help.

  2. #202
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,463

    Post

    >I have heard about Robinia's honey and I am now planting a thousand of small trees.

    I think certain trees are about the most promising honey plants for the area and the nectar output.

  3. #203
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

    Post

    Alvaro:

    Greetings, glad to hear from you.

    I have a long fenceline with about a 50-foot border of black locust, our name for the Robinia Pseudoacacia.

    It makes delicious honey, but on flat land it has a very short bloom period--less than two weeks--in my area about one week. In addition it blooms early and the honeyflow often coincides with inclement weather.

    I heard recently about a newly developed locust that has a very long bloom period. I think it was called Robinia Perseverens.
    I have no idea of its honey producing qualities as I have not yet been able to get any information concerning it.

    However, if you are situated in hilly or mountainous country the common black locust should do wonders for you. It will begin blooming at the lower levels and work up to the top of the hills as the season moves along.

    As for me, I need to find out more about the Robinia Perseverens.
    Ox

  4. #204
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Is this it?
    http://www.thetreemanpr.com/plants/d...rple_robe.html

    OK, here it is!
    http://www.forestfarm.com/search/clo...lantID=rops014

    [This message has been edited by BULLSEYE BILL (edited May 07, 2004).]

  5. #205
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

    Post

    Bullseye:

    This looks good, but I am almost certain it was Perseverens, not Semperflorens. Even so, Semperflorens would be a good start.

    I am going to call the local paper's garden editor.
    Ox

  6. #206
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,600

    Post

    I emailed the folks at Forest Farms re: this plant - they have it listed as an ornamental, and did not have any info re: nectar production or suitability as a honey plant.

    Keith

    [This message has been edited by kgbenson (edited May 11, 2004).]

  7. #207
    Alvaro Ferrés Guest

    Post

    Ox:
    Thanks you very much for your reply. I understand the problem with the black locust (Robinia Pseudoacacia) because its short blooming. Near my home there is a street with a lot and I now remember their bloom is very short.
    I continue investigating about planting for bees. There are other posibilities: I am thinking and learning about salix, acer or tilia. Anyway I am now seeding Robinia and Eucaliptus Robusta, which is a good nectar and is beautiful.

    Here in Uruguay nobody thinks about planting for bees. There are 700.000 hectareas of planted trees for pulp. Most of them are Eucaliptus Globulus, Grandis and Teretricornis. The Eucaliptus grows very quickly on my country, it gives up to 30 cubic meters per hectarea year; and gives very much nectar but Eucaliptus honey is black and not considered of good quality.
    There are lots of clover and lotus fields. Beekeepers are always looking for these places.
    So when I speak about planting for bees, people think I am crazy. But as Bill writed, if is not a good business, is a good hobby. And sure is important and good for society.

    Well, I keep in contact with you all. Best regards, Alvaro

  8. #208
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rockford, Michigan
    Posts
    147

    Post

    I've read all through this thread and have only found one comment in regards to the taste of the honey from the Russian Olive bush which was that it was very inferior. The bush did produce water white honey. This is the next big bloom for me which should occur any day now. There are hundreds of these bushes in the fields around me.
    Can anyone else confirm that the Russian Olive produces such bad tasting honey?
    Thanks

  9. #209
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    Alvaro:
    Have you considered American Basswood?

    Tilia americana Tiliaceae

    http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/forestry/...s/basswood.htm

    If you search the forum you will find lots of posts about it.

    I just planted 50. They are just starting to leaf out. I got some real nice trees this year from Cascade Forestry.

    http://www.cascadeforestry.com/

    Using the County tree planter my wife and I had them planted in an hour. All except the 4 I hand planted around my bee yard.

    I always get the biggest they have. They are sold out now of the bigger ones.

  10. #210
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    438

    Post

    I planted 25 Basswood I got from Cascade and they are all leafing out nicely. I am very pleased with the quality of trees they sent me.

  11. #211
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    Hey Danno, glad to hear it! I went through last night and hoed them. It looks like we have to watch out for Japanese Beetle damage.

    http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/forestry/...s/basswood.htm

    Cascade only charged me for the smaller trees, even though the size was really pretty good. I ordered the 2-3 foot size but they graded smaller. I was surprised how many had multiple trunks.

  12. #212
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    medesto,indiana,usa
    Posts
    257

    Post

    I just picked up some small nuc's I had in a Black locust patch and they each collected about 5-15 lbs of nectar of honey in about 2 days.This year hasn't been the best for locust too.Locust can start blooming their 3rd year for transplant and Ive seen them have a few blooms their 2nd year.

  13. #213
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    438

    Post

    Hey, Berkey, I went out to check them for Japanese Beetle damage last night and, knock wood, none so far. I was amazed to see that every single tree was alive and doing well. Didn't lose a single seedling. That's a first for me when planting this many trees. Stay tuned and thanks for the tip! -Danno

  14. #214
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    Danno & franc

    Danno: Yeah I was very impressed, I have not (double knock on wood) lost any of the bare rooted basswood stock yet either. It probably helped that the spring was cool and wet. Last year I lost about 10 % of my sugar maples right of the bat, and another 10-15% to rabbit damage during the fall and winter.

    Franc I drove down to Cincinnati last weekend and could not believe how strong the Black Locust bloom was. The Black Locust was blooming heavy as far north as Dayton, OH as of May 15th.

  15. #215

    Post

    For those of you who are planting clover in pastures that are burned - Does the clover tolerate the burning the next year? If the pastures are burned say, in April, will the clovers survive?

    Billy Smart
    BEE-L snob since 1999
    What's a swarm in April worth?

  16. #216
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Yes, we burn almost every year and it causes neither clover or alfalfa any problems. It will come back strong.

    The only time you might have a problem is when the ground is too dry or you burn before the crown starts to green up.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  17. #217
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    Bill and Billy

    Why do you burn?

  18. #218
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    It's a tradition. You should see the great Flint Hills of Kansas in the springtime. Prairie firestorms, flames fifty foot high, racing across the hills and ravines, animals running terrified for their lives, smoke so thick it causes auto accidents on the Turnpike killing thousands of people, well, a few now and again. You just can not immagine how much fun you can have with a lighter and a pitchfork!

    But the real reason is to clear the fields of old vegetation to make room for new growth. The old grass stocks livestock will not eat need to be removed as well as old weeds and immature tree saplings.

    It really is wonderous to see the different stages of renewal. The blazing fire. The blackened land. The new growth. Then the soft lush green fields interspursed with prairie blooms and cowpatties.

    AH, Kansas!.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  19. #219

    Post

    Some of my acreage is in the CRP program and I am contractually obligated to either burn or mow the CRP grass every few years. For the sake of simplicity though I burn the whole lot rather than just the CRP portion. If you could see how lush and green the new growth comes back you would understand why.

    It is believed in the prehistory of the region that large, unbridled, prarie fires were a common occurance on the plains of Kansas, hence the unbroken, treeless grass land that met the Spanish explorers who first wandered here. It was this grass prarie that produced the gargantuan herds of buffalo that once wandered in these parts. Since the area was settled these prarie fires have become less frequent, and in the opinion of some, to the detriment of the ecology of the grassland prarie.

    A lighter and pitchfork is old school. I use a butane torch.

    Billy Smart
    BEE-L snob since 1999
    What's a swarm in April worth?

  20. #220
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,463

    Post

    >It is believed in the prehistory of the region that large, unbridled, prarie fires were a common occurance on the plains of Kansas, hence the unbroken, treeless grass land that met the Spanish explorers who first wandered here.of the grassland prarie.

    The American Indians used to light them every spring.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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