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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Quincy, IL
    Posts
    26

    Question

    I'm in the process of moving my hives from Little Rock, AR to Quincy, IL where I see a tremendous number of black locust trees. They are almost like weeds here! They are very near bloom (virtually starting right this second). Anyway, how long should the flow last and how much, if any, honey should I get from them?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    Black Locust blooms prolifically although not every year. Trees go through a cycle of buildup over 3 or so years with a massive bloom and subsequent large seedcrop in the peak year.. This is greatly affected by the weather the previous year. This heavy seedcrop will usually throw a poor bloom the next year as the tree starts the cycle again. It makes a wonderful, light honey that has a premium flavor. The bloom will last 2 or 3 weeks depending on the weather and coolness. In our area the bees (in June) tend to use it for buildup although some years we get lucky. I'd be interested to know who much you get as I've never had a clear picture of how much it produces in comparision to blooms.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Stronghurst,Illinois
    Posts
    168

    Post

    Check around for black berry brammbels as well . I found some here that they oughta make a dandy crop from weaher permiting like always .

    Drifter
    Some can learn by others mistakes , others have to whizz on the electric fence for themslves .

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    medesto,indiana,usa
    Posts
    257

    Post

    If the hives are built up you should be able to get about 100 lbs per hive on a 2-3 week black locust bloom.Alot depends on the weather, you need dry warm weather for a good locust honey harvest.This year should be good because its blooming late enough that a frost shouldn't kill it or set it back.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    And don't forget to send us all a jar.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Greetings . . .

    BLACK locust / HONEY locust, whats the difference?

    Do they BOTH produce a honey crop?

    My BLACK locust is a bit past peak (some blooms are falling). Can't find HONEY locust.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Jamesport Long Island NY
    Posts
    150

    Post

    Dave,
    I believe a honey locust is a "domestic" thornless varity, and the black locust is the native or wild tree. Both yeild a flow if you have enough of them around.
    In a good year, if it all comes together, I have gotten 120 lbs per hive of very light almost yellow honey.

    Bill S
    "Keeping bees for over 50 years and starting to get the hang of it"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    985

    Post

    The length depends on the temperature.....If it stays in the 60-70 range you get 2 weeks plus. If it gets to high 80 (like it is suppose to ) you get a few days....4-7. Locust trees will bloom EVERY year if not killed by freezing. They are very freeze sensative. The FIRST thing that appears at the nodule on the limb in early spring is the bloom pod. It will be smaller than your pinky fingernail and has the shape of a cluster of grapes. Many times it will have its nose stuck out an dit gets forzen....and you never see it unless you get close and look. It will kill out at 30....worse than peaches. It will turn brown and thats why it doesnt bloom every year. Rick

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    mn, wi, tx
    Posts
    174

    Post

    Black locust bean (seed) pods are very thin, 3-5 inches long by 3/8 inch wide. Black locust produces much honey.

    Honey locust produces little if any honey. It has very large, thick pods, some up to a foot long with a curving twist to them. Inside are BIG seeds the size of peas. These seeds will germinate if you first score, or cut, the outer seed coat. The covering is extremely hard.

    Why the Honey Locust is so named when it produces nothing is beyond me.

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