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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Yanbu,Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    27
    Today i had a look at one of my hives, I noticed many drones leaving and entering the hive. Is this normal?

    The last time I checked this hive is ten days ago where everything was normal with three frames of nice brood and the rest have good amounts of honey and pollen.

    Does feeding has anything to do with this? I add some kind of "queen booster" with the sugar syrub in the entrance feeder. I also dry feed small quantities of soy flour with turmeric powder. However, both syrub and the dry mix are in very small quantities and the bees do not consume them quickly.

    Any explanation is highly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,903

    Post

    I guess when I see a lot of drones I start looking through my hives for drone comb. Sometimes a queen has gone infertile and started laying them. Although I haven't seen it, they say sometimes a queen dies and a queenless hive has a worker who starts laying them. Maybe it's not that, but it would be good to check. If you see a lot of those bullet shaped (domed on top) brood, then you are getting a lot of drone layed. You probably should cull the comb that is full of drone. If you see nothing but that you need a new queen.

    If you don't find any significant amount of drone comb in your hives, I wouldn't worry about it.

  3. #3

    Post

    Are you coming to the end of your season? What happens when fall starts and cooler temps come, the bees will start to kick the drone out of the hive. They are trying to get back in for food. There also may be virgin queens flying and not all the drones were able to mate.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    >>Are you coming to the end of your season? >>What happens when fall starts and cooler >>temps come, the bees will start to kick >>the drone out of the hive. They are trying >>to get back in for food. There also may be >>virgin queens flying and not all the >>drones were able to mate.
    I was thinking the same thing. I know I've seen that happen in the past. When I saw it the first time, I did not understand either, so I read into it. Now, I just log on here and get the opinions of others. If I disagree, then I read.
    Drones unable to mate? Could be, but the season is winding down here, but maybe not in Saudia Arabia...

    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

    [This message has been edited by Hook (edited September 15, 2002).]

  5. #5

    Post

    hello
    did you find a lot of drone cell comb in your hive? and when was the last time you changed the foundation?
    fall is usely when you will see lot of drones at entrence getting ready for winter.
    is you hive very heavy? and do you have alot of sealed brood? mostly worker cells?
    you should find a local beekeeper to give a little help.
    good luck
    Don

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Yanbu,Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    27

    Post

    Hello;

    Thanks for the replies.

    Michael:
    As I mentioned, I checked the hive ten days ago. I found three frames full of brood and very uniform. Probably one or two other frames with drone cells. The hive is very active and full of worker bees.

    rainesridgefarm:
    Yes, we are at the end of season here. I also thought of your comments.


    fat/beeman:
    <did you find a lot of drone cell comb in your hive? and when was the last time you changed the foundation?>
    Yes I found many drones cells, but no comparison with the number of sealed worker cells.
    The hive is heavy and and active.

    I only wonder if bee boosters may affect worker bees and make them lay drone eggs.


    thanks



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,903

    Post

    If you have more than 10% drone comb on a frame it should be culled. If there are a lot of worker brood on the frame I sometimes cut the drone comb out and let the workers finish emerging. If you cut the drone comb out and move the frame to the other side of a queen excluder the queen won't lay them again.

    The only thing I know of causing workers to lay is the lack of the pherome that the queen produces. I wouldn't think bee booster would supress that pherome in the queen. I would say if you have a lot of worker and drone brood you need a new queen or else you've let your brood comb get really old. Either way I'd cull the brood comb.

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