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  1. #1
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    The latest news on the beekeeping ban in Crestline Ohio is that they will do a final reading of the ordinance and vote on it on Monday, July 26. At this time we can all help fight this by sending letters of support to the local newspaper,
    the Crestline Advocate, P.O. Box 226
    Crestline, OH 44827
    crestlineadvocate@bright.net

    The deadline for being published before the next city council meeting is noon 7/19 CDT. for reference : From The Plain Dealer
    Cleveland, Ohio

    Beekeeper stung by town's law on hives
    Sunday, July 04, 2004
    Michael Sangiacomo, Plain Dealer Reporter

    Crestline, Ohio- Bees and their keepers are not welcome in this town, which mystifies and saddens the only beekeeper in town.

    "I can't help but take it personally when a whole law is aimed at me," said David Duncan, a beekeeper for more then 20 years.

    City officials admitted that the law, which could take effect this month, is aimed at Duncan.

    "A person who lives close to Duncan is allergic to bees and asked the city to outlaw beekeeping," said Mark Milliron, assistant safety director of Crestline, a city with about 5,000 residents west of Mansfield. "We realized we had no legislation about beekeeping, so we drew one up."

    City Council gave the proposal a first reading last week. It must pass two more readings before it can become law. After that, anyone harboring bees in the city would face minor misdemeanor charges and fines.

    "This is just so ridiculous," said Duncan.

    "I have two or three hives at my home and 20 in a two-acre property at the city limits. The rest of my hundred hives are spread out around the area. My bees pollinate backyard gardens and trees all over the city.

    "Getting rid of my hives is not going to protect this person who is allergic to stings. What about feral bees? Wasps? Yellowjackets? Those are the insects that are more likely to sting a person."

    Milliron said the ordinance would not allow Duncan to keep his bees under a "grandfather clause" - a provision that would allow an operation that predated the law to continue after the law took effect.

    Milliron said similar ordinances exist in a handful of other communities, including Willoughby. No bee complaints have been filed in Willoughby since the ordinance was passed in 1983.

    "Crestline's ordinance outlaws all bees," Duncan said. "I'm allergic to cats; should we outlaw all cats? Wouldn't it be wiser for the one person who is allergic to bees just to keep medication with her at all times? Wouldn't that be smarter?"

    Jim Tew, the bee specialist at the Ohio State University Honey Bee Laboratory in Wooster, said the bees will not follow the law.

    "I'm very disappointed to hear this," he said. "Eliminating the city's only beekeeping will not stop bees, wasps and other stinging insects from coming into the city. I wonder if the city realizes how important beekeepers are to the state's agricultural economy?"

    Duncan said if the law is passed, he would move his hives out of the city.

    "It just does not make sense to me," he said. "We have a person in town with a pet wolf that escaped its yard and chased a kid on a bike last week, and no one says a word about that. But I have a couple beehives, and they pass a law against me."

    ------------------
    Tom Patterson
    Aurora, CO

    [This message has been edited by tom patterson (edited July 13, 2004).]

  2. #2
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    "City officials admitted that the law, which could take effect this month, is aimed at Duncan."........sounds like a Bill of Attainer. Call the ACLU.

  3. #3
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    Jul 2004
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    The city officals need to read Beekeeping for Dummies, bu Howland Blackiston pgs.36-39. It clearly describes honey bee behavior compared to wasps, hornets, yellow jackets. I will make sure they receive a copy of this.

  4. #4
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    Apr 2004
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    Aurora, Colorado, USA
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    Here are the addresses:

    Crestline City Council Members


    (President)
    Jerry Harbaugh
    812 North Thoman Street
    Crestline, OH 44827

    Michael Blaising
    201 Kink Blvd.
    Crestline, OH 44827


    Ken Frisbe
    134 Etler Drive
    Crestline, OH 44827


    Jan Maddy
    501 East Bucyrus Street
    Crestline, OH 44827


    Robert Miller
    905 Klink Blvd.
    Crestline, OH 44827


    David Van Dyne
    369 North Wiley Street
    Crestline, OH 44827

    Myles Creed
    555 Thrush Ave.
    Crestline, OH 44827


    Gerald Bickert
    413 Maple Drive
    Crestline, OH 44827

    (Mayor)
    Pete Dzugan
    1033 Klink Blvd.
    Crestline, OH 44827


    Kelly Kurtzman
    1001 Klink Blvd.
    Crestline, OH 44827

  5. #5
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    Jun 2004
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    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Angry

    You mean with todays lost of jobs these people want to distroy a buisness? I would make a few phone calls if I was Mr Duncan, like the small buisness mans association, his bee keepers organization, and since they are specifically going after him I would have a discrimination suit against each of them and as a whole. I am sure there is a lawyer that keeps bees in his area. Would make great publicity. Little guy with a busness singled out by town who want to distroy his living. Whats next can't extract honey at the site too?
    Dan

  6. #6
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    Apr 2004
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    Reading my original posting I realize how hard it is to find the email address for the Crestline Advocate.

    Here it is clearly:
    crestlineadvocate@bright.net

    Dave is pursuing several different approaches. One of them is to have a number of letters go to the local newspaper editor giving support of having beekeeping in the City of Crestline. Any other comments showing support of Dave Dunkin addressed to the paper editor would be helpful. It is important to have the City Council realize there is a large world outside of Crestline and there are people paying attention to what they are doing. I understand Dave has made local contact with the Beekeeping assocaition and the ACLU already.

  7. #7
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    Jun 2004
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    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
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    I'll contribute to the advocation. I am only one person, but if everyone contributes, may'be we can do something about it.

  8. #8
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    Jul 2004
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    tulsa, ok usa
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    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AA159


    Bee Stings and "Allergic" Reactions1
    Malcolm T. Sanford2
    A bee sting is always potentially serious. The severity and duration of a reaction can vary from one person to another. In addition, one's own reaction to a bee sting may differ between occurrences. Most persons experience a local non-serious allergic reaction to bee venom. However, depending on the location and number of bee stings received, as well as the ever-present possibility of a severe allergic reaction to bee venom, a serious reaction can be precipitated that can be life-threatening.

    The honey bee's barbed sting cannot be withdrawn by the insect once it has penetrated the skin. The bee's only means of escape is to tear away part of its abdomen leaving behind the sting with its venom sac attached. The muscles of the sting apparatus continue to pulsate after the bee has flown away, driving the sting deeper into the skin and injecting more venom. For this reason the sting apparatus should be scraped (not pulled) out of the skin as soon as possible after a sting is received.

    Recommendations for someone getting stung include notifying a companion in case assistance becomes necessary, immediately removing the sting apparatus by scraping it out of the skin, and applying ice which helps reduce swelling and pain. If you suspect a serious reaction, then it is advisable to seek medical assistance.

    The following information is provided for those who wish to know more about possible reactions to stings. In all cases, when in doubt ask assistance from a qualified medical professional.

    Two kinds of reactions are usually associated with bee stings and those of other stinging insects as well: (1) local or (2) systemic, allergic or life-threatening. There is agreement that a local reaction is generally characterized by: pain, swelling, redness, itching and a wheal surrounding the wound made by the stinging apparatus. This is the reaction of the vast majority of persons and those suffering it are considered to be at little risk of death, unless the mouth or throat is affected so that the respiratory tract is obstructed. Nevertheless, many in the general population continue to believe that because they "swell up," they are at risk of losing their life when stung by bees. Ironically, it may in fact be the reverse. Those far more at risk may show no reactions to stings at all.

    For the beekeeping community, an authoritative review was published in 1982 by Harry R. C. Riches, "Hypersensitivity to Bee Venom," Bee World, Vol. 63, Number 1, pp. 7-72. Dr. Riches classified bee venom hypersensitivity into two categories. Type I is the usual reaction resulting from venom components affecting mast cells which then release histamine (associated with pain and swelling) and other chemicals. Type III reactions are delayed responses to stings, produced by a substance called precipitin. They are considered extremely rare.

    Dr. Riches' Type I bee venom hypersensitivity reactions were listed in increasing order of severity as large local reactions, systemic reactions and anaphylaxis. Systemic reactions, he said, were generalized reactions occurring within a few minutes of a sting. Mildest symptoms were flushing of the skin, followed by an itchy nettle-rash and more serious included chest wheeze, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pains, palpitations and faintness. In addition, the speed of onset of a reaction was an indication of its seriousness. Anaphylaxis, he said, occurred within seconds or minutes of a sting. Common initial symptoms are chest wheeze, nausea, vomiting, and confusion followed by falling blood pressure leading to death.

    According to Dr. Riches, treatment of local reactions included removing the stinging apparatus and applying calamine or cold compresses (not substances containing antihistamines which can cause skin irritation). Stings inside the mouth and on the eyeball require special attention and are so very serious, he concluded, that a veil should always be worn when working bees. For treatment of systemic reactions Dr. Riches recommended adrenaline administered according to severity of symptoms by inhalation to injection by syringe, and for anaphylaxis, adrenaline injected intramuscularly.

    Type III bee venom hypersentivity reactions were grouped as arthus type, serum sickness and others. Arthus reaction becomes apparent 8-12 hours after a sting and could persist two to three days. It is associated with an excess of percipitins and often causes tissue damage, blistering and bruising. Serum sickness is more likely after an episode of multiple stings (malaise, fever, joint pains, skin rashes, swelling of lymph glands, kidney disturbances) and may develop three to ten days after a sting. Finally, very rare medical disorders such as encephalitis, polyneuritis and renal failure have followed insect stings.

    The latter appears to be a major symptom of mass bee attacks in Latin America by Africanized honey bees. This, however, is something totally different than incidents where one or a few bees are involved. Any person regardless of sensitivity to bee venom receiving an enormous number of stings might be susceptible to renal failure or other severe symptoms simply because their body was challenged by a great quantity of toxin.

    A quick glance at Dr. Riches' categories and symptoms indicates a good deal of overlap between symptoms and treatment of systemic and anaphylactic reactions. In addition, the general tone of Dr. Riches' article appears to be one suggesting that most systemic reactions are life-threatening to some degree. Many physicians agree with this, some preferring to call any allergic or systemic reaction "life-threatening".

    This life-threatening bias has little basis, according to Dr. Howard S. Rubenstein who published "Bee-Sting Diseases," The Lancet, February 27, 1982 pp. 496-599. Dr. Rubenstein begins with the statement: "Many of the large number of people who are stung each year by bees experience frightening systemic-reactions, but the vast majority of such reactions are not life-threatening. There is no evidence that the very few who die as a result of a bee sting come from the pool of those who once before sustained a systemic reaction. On the contrary, no reaction at all may be a more ominous predictor of a lethal outcome on a subsequent sting." Death from bee stings comes about through a number of mechanisms, Dr. Rubenstein said, the most important of which appears to be atherosclerosis (build up of deposits in the arteries). Also, external factors affect mortality such as environmental temperature and site of the sting. Disagreement over bee-sting diseases, according to Dr. Rubenstein, is caused by four sources of confusion: (1) the frightening presentation of the systemic reaction; (2) misuse of the term "anaphylaxis"; (3) multiple causes of "bee-sting" deaths; and (4) lack of information about the systemic reaction.

    The frightening aspect of being stung cannot be ruled out as a cause of a systemic reaction, Dr. Rubenstein said. "A patient who suddenly develops hives, shortness of breath (sometimes with bronchospasm), and giddiness or syncope (sometimes with hypotension) is terrified, as are those about him. The patient may think he is going to die, as may his family or physician. What people need to know, therefore, is that the vast majority of patients, particularly if aged under 25, will quickly recover." In addition, according to Dr. Rubenstein, patients who have these terrifying experiences need to know that there is no evidence either that they came to the brink of death or that they are at greater risk of dying from a subsequent sting than anyone else.

    It is this last statement that raises a few eyebrows; conventional wisdom in the past has accepted that reactions are likely to get infinitely worse with each sting after a person suffers a systemic reaction. It is lamentable, Dr. Rubenstein said, that in bee sting cases physicians did not check vital signs before administering adrenaline; even more lamentable is that patients who die as a result of stings generally have post mortem diagnosis of atherosclerosis, not anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is very rare in humans, he said, and except in specific cases in which it truly applies, should be replaced by the neutral, non-prognostic, non-frightening and non-specific term "systemic reaction." Multiple causes of bee sting deaths are the rule, rather than simple anaphylaxis, according to Dr. Rubenstein. Other potential complications besides atherosclerosis include sepsis, cerebral oedema, defibrination syndrome, haemorrhages, emboli and neuroencephalomyelitis variants. The fact that 90% of those who die after a bee sting are over 25, whereas most who sustain allergic reactions are children argues strongly against allergy. Only 12% of adults in one set of necropsy findings died of anaphylaxis, 20% had severe and 42% mild atherosclerosis and about one-third had pulmonary oedema.

    Fright cannot be ruled out, Dr. Rubenstein said, nor can very warm environmental temperature. As he stated: "One may readily see how (1) a hot summer day, plus (2) strenuous exercise, plus (3) coronary atherosclerosis, plus (4) a bee may add up to death, whether or not one invokes an allergic mechanism..." Finally, there is a lack of detailed epidemiological study on systemic reactions, according to Dr. Rubenstein. Often cited studies showed that systemic reactions to bee stings were rather frequent, benign and self-limiting, with a prevalence in the U.S. of 0.4% to 0.8%. The authors of two studies of 8000 boy scouts which produced the above figures found no reason for alarm and did not call the reactions they witnessed either life-threatening or anaphylactic. Another study revealed that prevalence of sustained systemic reactions was no greater in an allergic population than the population at large, again not referring to those experienced as life-threatening or anaphylactic, and further arguing against an allergic basis. In two more studies where the combined number of systemic reactions reached over 700, no deaths were reported.

    Given this evidence, Dr. Rubenstein found it difficult to understand the following statements: "As many as 4 people per 1000 may have serious systemic reactions and therefore live in real fear of the sequelae of a subsequent sting." "Fear of fatal reactions and the consequent change in life-style is more widespread because 0.4 to 0.8 percent of the U.S. population has survived a systemic reaction to a sting." "Four out of every 1000 persons are so allergic to insect venom that a single bee sting can produce a fatal systemic reaction in their bodies within 15 minutes." These statements, he concluded, suggest a deadly epidemic. The anxiety of the authors, he charged, has been transmitted to patients and physicians and unnecessarily terrified hundreds of thousands because they are not supported by any epidemiological study. Thus, Dr. Rubenstein concluded: "...when those at risk are unidentifiable and so few; when the experiment justifying the treatment is so seriously flawed; when the treatment itself is not without risk, has not been shown to do the job intended for it, and is very costly; then we cannot justify it." All this appears to be good news for those who can now inform the curious that according to at least one physician, risk of fatality from a systemic or allergic reaction to bee sting is lower than previously thought. What must be emphasized, however, is that environmental factors and physical well being of the individual being stung cannot be ignored when judging who is at risk of dying from a bee sting. Nor can perceptions by the individual being stung. Panic by the person stung or those around him/her can produce a systemic reaction in itself.

    In the 1992 edition of The Hive and the Honey Bee, Dadant & Sons, Inc., pp. 1219-1220, Dr. Justin Schmidt reiterates many of Rubenstein's points concerning allergic, life threatening reactions: "In sting-induced deaths, the venom toxins, themselves, are of no direct consequence in causing death. Hence, adult (or large) size is not of intrinsic benefit. What are important are: 1) How long the body had had to experience previous stings and develop sensitization, 2) how well and how normally the immune system functions, and 3) how the rest of the body reacts during an acute anaphylactic episode. Increased age adversely affects all these factors...In oversimplified terms, venom-induced allergy can be viewed as a malfunctioning of the immune system and its system of regulation."

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Footnotes
    1. This document is Fact Sheet ENY-122, a series of the Entomology and Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Reviewed: February, 1995.
    2. Malcolm T. Sanford, professor, Department of Entomology and Nematology, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity - Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office.

    Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Larry R. Arrington, Interim Dean

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Copyright Information
    This document is copyrighted by the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) for the people of the State of Florida. UF/IFAS retains all rights under all conventions, but permits free reproduction by all agents and offices of the Cooperative Extension Service and the people of the State of Florida. Permission is granted to others to use these materials in part or in full for educational purposes, provided that full credit is given to the UF/IFAS, citing the publication, its source, and date of publication.



    [This message has been edited by magnet-man (edited July 13, 2004).]

  9. #9
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    Here's the email address and phone number of the reporter who wrote the Plain Dealer article. Sometimes it's worth the time to educate the guy who buys ink by the barrel when you're looking for a particular angle in a story. He's likely to be the one following the outcome and chasing down background.

    msangiacomo@plaind.com, 216-999-4890

  10. #10
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    Apr 2004
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    Aurora, Colorado, USA
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    Thank you each for your replies.

    I already had the name, email and phone # for the Plain Dealer article, but what I am hoping to do is stimulate people to write to the local paper, the Crestline Advocate.

    crestlineadvocate@bright.net

    The Advocate is not online like the Plain Dealer, but it will have a much stronger effect on influencing the people actually making the decisions (the City Council)

    Davlanders said he was only one person but he would write a letter to the Advocate. Hopefully other people are writing the Advocate. This is great! I realize that a forum is about discusssion, the info about stings and allergy posted by magnet man is great, but I would actually be very happy if no-one posted anything else on this topic and instead everyone who read it were to send an email to the Advocate.

    crestlineadvocate@bright.net


  11. #11
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    Jul 2004
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    tulsa, ok usa
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    Smile

    I sent an e-mail after I did the post.

    If you read above post in detail, you will find that the good doctor is saying that allergic reaction to stings is over blown. But as beekeepers, we already knew that! It is nice to see it in print in a medical journal.

    [This message has been edited by magnet-man (edited July 14, 2004).]

  12. #12
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    A lot of people think they have an allergic reaction because they swell up for 3 days and have itching. None realy bother to see a Dr to confirm that they are. I run into this all the time.
    Dan

  13. #13
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    Aurora, Colorado, USA
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    Magnet man,

    Thanks for sending the letter to the Advocate! Yes, i had read your post and I'm saving it in my file of "helpful bee stuff". I just wasn't sure you had sent this to crestlineadvocate@bright.net and I was hoping you had. Again, thanks and thank you to all who have written crestlineadvocate@bright.net
    without posting anything. Have to go to work at my real job now.

    Tom

  14. #14
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    May 2003
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    Tom,

    I e-mailed this in to the Crestline Advocate. They said that they will publish it in the next addition. Hope it helps.

    To Whom it May Concern,

    I recently read an article regarding the proposed outlaw of beekeeping in Crestline, Ohio. What specifically caught my attention was the following quote.
    "A person who lives close to Duncan is allergic to bees and asked the city to outlaw beekeeping," said Mark Milliron, assistant safety director of Crestline, a city with about 5,000 residents west of Mansfield. "We realized we had no legislation about beekeeping, so we drew one up."

    What's next, is the city of Crestline going to outlaw diesel powered vehicles? After all, for people with asthma, diesel emissions have the potential to initiate a potentially life threatening situation. A person living within city limits doesn't have to have a diesel powered vehicle. Once the diesel leaves the exhaust pipe the diesel owner has little control over where it goes or whom it effects. When do people let their diesel engines idle to warm up? In winter when it is cold out. When does asthmatic sensitivity increase (for many), you got it, in cold weather. For some people diesel emissions are just an annoyance for others it's a far more serious situation.

    My point is simply this, once the government starts to limit freedoms of all in an effort to provide security for a few it quickly becomes a slippery slope. I am an asthmatic, and its my problem. I hope your city council will have the wisdom to view the forest and not just the trees.

    Cliff Johnson


  15. #15
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    Wink

    My, my, my. What a rowdy bunch you all are. I have it on VERY good authority that the letters and emails are pouring in to Crestline, and the sentiment is running unanimously against banning beekeeping. I'm betting that the good folks on the council will do the right thing and let the proposed ordinance fade away.

  16. #16
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    This is common enough that maybe the Industry should have an information pak and website devoted to the subject. Getting town councils the facts and some model legislation would go a long way toward keeping things sane.

    Local politics will always be a challenge.

    >Allergic to ignorance, still waiting on legislation

  17. #17
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    I myself am concerned and wrote this to them....I am going to try to get one passed like Aurora Colorado passed before somebody with fear tries this in my town.


    To Crestline Ohio City Council,

    I am a beekeeper and as such I keep a hive close to my home in town. This not only benefits me but also my entire town in the pollination of their gardens and their fruit trees they so adore. I do keep a low profile so as not to alarm anyone, as some people are frightened of bees. I understand that and keep my hive in a fenced enclosure. It has come to my attention that your town is wanting to ban beekeeping altogether in town due to one person being allergic to them. Does that really make sense? I am sure that there are many more people in town who are allergic to cat dander or to dog fur but has the city outlawed them? How about a person allergic to peanuts? Is the grocery store going to be banned from stocking them because a bag might spill and a person might come in contact with them? How about rubber? Many people are allergic to it so why not ban all tires? I guess I could go on but my point is that many people are allergic to many different things and we can not possibly ban them for each person. Each person is responsible for their own self and only in the gross negligence should another be held responsible. By banning beekeeping the town council is playing on the fear of bees which, if managed by a responsible beekeeper, are not likely to swarm nor be as aggressive as wild bees are, which I am most certain are already taking up residences in trees and buildings in your town. A bee is only aggressive when its hive is disturbed and only stings in the "field" when swatted at or stepped on unlike a wasp (which I am sure you have too) which attacks for no apparent reason. Please consider what Aurora, Colorado did and pass an ordinance like they did to not only protect the non-beekeeper but also the beekeepers rights. Thank you for your time, from an outside concerned person.

    Wayne Flewelling, Jr.
    Lyndon, KS

  18. #18
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    I sent them an email the day I made my post expressing very similar sentiments to others in this thread. Does anyone have access to this local paper? I know you said it is not online, but I would really like to see the articles/letters published following this ordeal. Any way of posting that kind of information?

  19. #19
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    I'll see what I can do.

    Thanks, and thanks to all who have sent emails without posting here.

    Coyote, can you tell us (or email me) about your "VERY good authority" that has let you know emails are pouring into the Advocate?

    Thanks again

    Tom

  20. #20
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    Does this guy have a lawyer. Has anyone ever heard of judicial preemption. Has anyone checked to see if the state has any laws on the books. Many towns will make illegal laws and they stay because people do not want the expense of hiring a lawyer to fight it. This is a very commmon pratice especially with zoning laws. My father was a contractor he always fought and the towns always backed down when they knew they would loose and would be liable for our legal expenses. I'm not a lawyer but it's worth looking to. I'll send them a E-mail too!
    Gary

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