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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Wayne, NJ USA
    Posts
    381

    Post

    This past weekend the weather here in Jersey was quite cool in the morning and it stayed cloudy most of the day. So when I went to check on some newly (4 weeks ago) hived packages I wasn't all that suprised that they were not flying much. That is until I went over to my other yard and saw that my 2 hive from last year were just busting with activity. One of them has 4 boxes and the other has 5 (both a combination of deeps and Illnois). Well I thought that I had better cut these boys back before they swarm.

    Today I did just that I was able to pull 4 frames from one and 3 from the other. A combination of open & capped brood and honey. however when I opened up the larger of the two hives I noticed that I ripped open a good number of swarm cells that were built between two of the boxes. I don't know if I will just delay their swarming or if opening up the brood chamber might change their minds? I also hope that pulling out a few frames doesn't screw up their honey production. It's going to be interesting to see if the two nuks that I made up raise their own queens, guess only time will tell.
    Oh just another note, its real easy to work these hives, they have been a great beginners learning ground.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,762

    Post

    I don't know if I will just delay their swarming or if opening up the brood chamber might change their minds? I also hope that pulling out a few frames doesn't screw up their honey production. It's going to be interesting to see if the two nuks that I made up raise their own queens, guess only time will tell.

    If you put the old queen and all the open brood (if there is any) and maybe some capped brood up to half of the hive with her at a new location and leave one or two queen cells at the old location then with the old queen gone I think they will probably not swarm, but just requeen.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Wayne, NJ USA
    Posts
    381

    Post

    Michael,

    Thanks, seems like moving the old queen out is key to supressing the swarm potential. Unfortunately in separating the supers apart I ripped open the swarm cells (they were connected to bottom of one super and top of another.) Couldn't find the old queen either. I've since put new queens in the 2 splits. At this point I'm going to keep an eye the mother hive, if it grows more swarms cells, I'll try to find the queen and split it again (this time I'll remove the old lady). Certainly have learned for next year that I need to cut them back earlier.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,762

    Post

    That always seems to be a problem. The bees manage to put the queen cells right where they get destroyed the easiest by the beekeeper.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mineral, Virginia
    Posts
    188

    Post

    probably because these are the best locations for the queen cells; most amount of wood for foundation and plenty of room to make the cell.

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