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Thread: Newpaper Method

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
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    I used the newspaper method the 2 days ago to join 2 colonys and was just wondering when can I take the rest of the news paper off or does it take a few more days for the to become 1 hive, seems to me that they are probably already joined after the first 24 hours but I just wanted to check with you guys that have done this think.
    Ted

  2. #2
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    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    I would give em a week to settle their queen issues. They'll chew up everything inside and deposit it out front. Looks pretty neat actually. All you need to do is tear whats left on the outside. I would also make sure you have a queen when all is said and done. It is a very good method and almost always successful.

  3. #3
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    well the big hive had a queen but the hive I put above it didnt have a queen.
    Ted

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
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    I'm curious about this "Newspaper Method". It seems that I have heard of it a few years ago, but I am still somewhat in the dark concerning the actual procedure. Please correct me if I'm mistaken.

    This is a method to combine two "weak" hives into one stronger hive, by which you put one brood chamber on top of the other hive, with a sheet of newspaper in between. As the bees work through the newspaper, they acquire the same queen "smell" and when it is all said and done in a week, things are happy?

    A few questions then.

    1) Would you have to kill one of the queens? It seems that with the two queens the hives would war, and never completely "join forces".

    2) Do you want to put a deep full of honey, or some kind of spacer between the two? Or just brood box upon brood box, and let the queens battle it out.

    3) Do you have to provide some type of upper entrance for the upper hive body during this whole exercise? Or they just wait in there until thing are all done.

    Thanks for the clarification!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
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    Do nothing,the bees will do the rest.You should witness fine paper fibres outside the hive entrance or even see bees flying off with the fibres.To avoid any stress to the bees they would be best left undisturbed until your next check,say about 10 days.If out of curiosity you would like to take a brief look just crack the papered boxes,lift one end a short distance to see progress,you will more than likely bee amazed at what you see.Keep in mind that newspaper can also be used as a simple method for starting and raising queen cells above an excluder with little preparation.
    BOB

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >1) Would you have to kill one of the queens? It seems that with the two queens the hives would war, and never completely "join forces".

    If you have a preference, take care of it yourself. If you don't, let the bees take care of it.

    >2) Do you want to put a deep full of honey, or some kind of spacer between the two?

    Not necessary at all.

    >3) Do you have to provide some type of upper entrance for the upper hive body during this whole exercise?

    In really hot weather I try to provide a top entrance. Otherwise I don't worry about it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
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    You should be alright as the queenless hive will be ready for a new queen. Do check though, if you can't find the queen just look for open brood and you know you're OK.

    Jon, the newspaper method has all kinds of uses. You basically take 2 hive bodies with bees from seperate situations, place a sheet of newpaper with a few slits in it over the bottom and add the 2nd foreign colony. We us it to combine our 2 queen units at the end of 26 days as well as making instant 2 queen units with swarms. They will work out the queen issues internally. The bees chew up the paper into incredibly small pieces and "sweep"it out the entrance. In the spring and fall we use it to combine week hives as you mentioned. By the time the bees chew throuth the paper,(about a day or so) everyone except the queens get along. Very dependable method of combination. No upper entrance is needed during the get aquainted period.

  8. #8
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    Dec 2000
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    Texarkana, TX
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    Howdy twt and all --

    I have always assumed that if two queens are involved, the one on top has a better chance of survival. Has anyone ever done this with marked queens so that the survivor could be identified ?

    Doc

  9. #9
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    Why do you think the top one? I've never tried keeping track by marking them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
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    Is it necessary to feed the new (top) colony if you are feeding the lower one?
    Buy locally, buy only humanely raised animals, eat in season, keep bees!

  11. #11
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    >Is it necessary to feed the new (top) colony if you are feeding the lower one?

    No.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
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    Jan 2005
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    North Twin Cities, MN
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    This method has worked very well for me as well.
    Butterchurn<br /><br />Diplomacy is the art of saying \'Nice doggie\' until you can find a rock. <br /><br />Will Rogers

  13. #13
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    Thanks!
    Buy locally, buy only humanely raised animals, eat in season, keep bees!

  14. #14
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    Nov 2004
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    Guatemala
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    will a colony with laying workers be successfully united with a queenright hive using the paper method? Or will it require a more radical means like shaking?

  15. #15
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    &gt;will a colony with laying workers be successfully united with a queenright hive using the paper method? Or will it require a more radical means like shaking?

    Sometimes, but sometimes they will kill the queen. I've had the best luck putting the two hives on top of each other with a double screen board for a week so the laying worker hive can get used to the smell of the queen before doing the newspaper combine.

    But the most reliable seems to be to shake out the laying workers and give all their equipment to other hives. That way they will have to drift into other hives and I've never lost a queen that way.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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