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Thread: Eggs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    California- bay area
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    I recently removed up two hives.
    I checked the hives a few times one of the hives and it had eggs put I haven't noticed them change to larva. In the other hive I just checked today I finally saw eggs but the eggs were either in the middle of the cell on the bottom or stuck to the side. Do I have a sloppy queen or workers trying to be a queens?

    Joseph

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    Laying workers perhaps, and if so, bad news in my books. Hives with laying workers are a lost cause. I just shake the bees out.
    Anyone have other suggestions?

    Ian

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Are there multiple eggs in the same cell? This would be dead give-away of laying workers. Have you waited a few days for the eggs to hatch? You do have to look close to see that the larvae is hatched, but I assume you've waited a few days and nothing has hatched.

    If it is laying workers, I have just requeened and done ok, but I've only really done this once and it worked out fine. Dee Lusby say's it's the natural condition of a queenless hive for the workers to lay and she says to do what I did, which is just requeen. If I am misquoting her, I hope she corrects me.

    The standard answer is to shake them out as Ian says.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
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    571

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    i've heard a newly mated queen can be "sloppy" before she gets the hang of it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
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    I would say that it is either a bad queen or laying worker. Either way you will need to requeen if you want to save the colony. I have done the following:
    Order new queens. When the queens come.
    Take an empty brood box with drawn foundation, you can salvage frames from the current hive. Place it on the hive stand in place of the current hive.
    Place a double screen board on top of the bottom hive box with the queen cage in it.
    Place the current colony above the screen board. Within a few days most of the bees will have moved from the upper boxes to the lower box. The bees left will have the laying workers among them. Take these bees and shake them off about fifty feet from the current location. The laying workers will not be able to get back to the hive.
    Check that your queen has been released and combine all of the boxes.
    Good luck

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
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    Hi, I'm really new here, (just going into my third spring)but I had a goofy queen do that. There were eggs everywhere, but after a week or so she settled down and the hive did well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    It is the laying workers that will give you the problem when you try to requeen.

    Ian

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lynnville, Ia, USA
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    I've never had any luck requeening laying workers. We usualy stick a two frame nuc in them if we want to save them. The bees on the frames from the nuc will protect the queen and it's not much work. Normally we just unite these bees with another colony or shake them out. As a rule, they are not worth saving for us.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
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    It is really easy to save the colony with a new queen.

    The laying workers have not been outside for a long time and have no orientation anymore.
    Remove all frames including the bees and bring them to a place at least 300 meter away from the hive. Sweep all bees from the frame in the grass and put the empty frames back in your hive.

    All bees will come back except the laying workers.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
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    Thanks! I'll give the eggs a few days to see how they develop, if it turns out to be laying workers I'll try the shake out method. Thanks again for the info!

    Joseph

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    California- bay area
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    It turned out that only one of the hives has laying workers, but when I checked I saw four queen cells? should I make a split with them or just shake all the bees out and let the non-laying workers come back?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
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    If they have queen cells, they're already fixing the laying worker problem themselves.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    California- bay area
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    Thanks!

    Joseph

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