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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Salem, NY
    Posts
    350

    Post

    is there a problem with using telescoping covers without inner covers? I am guessing that the bees would propolize the cover to the top of the box it is resting on. What if I were to put a 3/8 inch piece of wood across each corner. then they would have a top entrance all around the hive, and there would not be too much surface area to propolize. Then in theory I could just lightly knock upwards on the corners of the cover with a hammer to loosen the connections. Or perhaps I can rub vaseline on the inner edges of the cover so propolis won't stick to it? I know people use migratory covers without inner covers, so i am guessing that the inner cover is not all too essential.

    Thanks,
    justgojumpit

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    On a migratory cover you need to wiggle your hive tool in the side to seperate the frames from the cover before lifting or you will lift the frames out. I really upset a lot of bees when I do this, so I tend not to use them.

    I was short an inner cover once and put a tel cover on for the week without it. Bad idea during the flow, I nearly ruined the cover trying to get it off, and talk about upsetting the bees. Glad I was armored up.

    I suppose if you had spacers to raise the lid it would be ok for a while if you removed it on a regular basis and scraped the wax off.

    I have noticed that a wider space the bees use wax to fill and seal and is much easier to pry apart. A smaller gap and they use propolis and is much harder to seperate.

  3. #3
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    > I have noticed that a wider space the bees
    > use wax to fill and seal and is much easier
    > to pry apart. A smaller gap and they use
    > propolis and is much harder to seperate.

    The critical thing is "can a bee fit its
    head into the space". This is (apparently)
    the trigger to decide between wax and propolis.

    If your outer cover is "stuck", a single
    sharp upwards blow with a hammer at one
    corner usually does the trick. Sends the
    cover flying off sometimes, but the bees
    are less disturbed by one solid "thwack"
    than a serious of less abrupt attempts.

    Migratory covers tend to be less problem
    overall, but I wonder if anyone has ever
    compared the two set-ups with any eye
    towards impact on production. Idle bees
    hand out on top of the inner cover, and
    with a migratory, where do they lounge?
    Do they get in the way of work? I have
    a random mix of both types, and I don't
    see any difference from hive records that
    jumps out at me, but it would be hard to
    see a mere 10% advantage.

    Merry Christmas everyone!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,453

    Post

    I'm with Bill. When I've done it, the problem is breaking the migratory cover loose. But I actually like to do this once for each cover, so that there's a bit of propolis on it to stick it a little bit to the inner cover. But not too much. It helps keep the lid from blowing off.

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