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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Big Grin

    Today I have had 3 calls about getting bees from me for sting therapy. All wanted 100 bees April 1st. What should I know about the legalitys of this? Have them sine a disclamer? What do you think the requirements to obtain the bees, A Doctors prescription? How much to charge for the bees? What type container?
    Clint


    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Post

    I never thought about having a disclaimer or a relase. I suppose it makes a certain amount of sense. If I was writing one I would state that I (the beekeeper) am not making any claims as to the efficacy of venom treatment and that they (the person being purposfully stung) cannot hold me responsoble for any reaction they may have to being stung. It wouldn't cost you anything to write up something simple like that and it might keep you from getting sued by someone with an adverse reaction or being charged by the FDA for purporting a fraudulent cure for something.

    Or maybe you should just say that you are selling them some bees, pure and simple. That you are not claiming they are good for any specific purpose and that you are not responsible for how they are used or what reaction anyone has to them.

    Frankly I doubt it will matter, but then look at some of the frivolous suits we've seen in recent years.

  3. #3

    Post

    Sorry, but in a lawsuit, disclaimers and waivers don't really matter. The chances of getting sued, though, are probably slim.
    If you are concerned about a lawsuit, tell them to go somewhere else. One place is Ferris Apiaries (http://www.radix.net/~honeybs/ferris.htm). I'm not endorsing them, I just happened to come across them on the Web.

  4. #4

    Post

    If they buy some honey and you give them some bees for free you are not really selling them bees. There are many people using them for therapy these days with great results. In market gardening or community supported agriculture programs they buy a box of produce and get a bottle of wine for free. The same applies here.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

    Post

    To be on the safe side, I would consult with someone at the American Apitherapy Society (http://www.apitherapy.org/). I understand that, either through them or from them, you can get bees to sting yourself ONCE you get introduced AND TESTED for allergic reactions by one of their people.

    Jorge

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Post

    >To be on the safe side, I would consult with someone at the American Apitherapy Society (http://www.apitherapy.org/).

    I think they might be able to give you advices all the way around on legalities and suggestions. I didn't know they existed.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    I have E-MAILed them and asked them. To this date I have received 9 calls about sting therapy bees and 3 repeat calls.

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Richmond, VA, USA
    Posts
    24

    Post

    While it's true that a disclaimer or waiver cannot keep anyone from suing you, it could very well keep them from winning the lawsuit. I don't know why newguy says disclaimers and waivers don't matter in a lawsuit; it isn't true under Virginia law and I doubt it's true under Michigan law.

    Also, the fact that you sell a person one thing and "give" them another thing does not mean you can't be liable for an injury caused by the thing you "gave" them. If you're looking for protection from lawsuits, that's not the way to go. Not that I think the risk of liability here is that great, but then, I know nothing about Michigan law.

    Here's the thing: if you are unwilling to sell bees for apitherapy unless you KNOW that it's legal, you need to consult a Michigan lawyer. If you want to minimize to the maximum extent possible the circumstances under which anyone could successfully sue you for doing so, you need to have a Michigan lawyer prepare an appropriate disclaimer/waiver/whatever. It's about risk and how much you're willing to pay to eliminate, or at least minimize, it.

    Which is probably not much. In which case, what Michael and Jorge suggest is probably not a bad idea. Just don't tell PETA.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    Try calling your insurance company and tell them that you're interested in starting up this bussiness. See what rates they quote you for coverage in the event that you are sued. Weight that cost verses profit.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Angry

    In my indoor shooting range, my insurance provider drew up the waiver that everyone who uses my facility must sign.

    I also thought that it was of no value, but they assured me that it does carry weight in a court of law.

    I also see it as a weezel point for the insurance carrier to refuse to cover me if someone sues me and has not signed a waiver...84674rds!

    Anyway, it's free if the carrier provides it, or you can have a lawyer draw one up if you would rather. My insurance company didn't like the one I had drawn up by a lawyer and replaced it with their own.

    Bill

  11. #11

    Post

    Boy just think about the 600,000 packages sold every year. 600,000 potential lawsuits for stings. Just give them some bees and do not worry about it.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    The following is the best information I could find on sting therapy.
    You do not need a prescription to sell bees. At the AAS we suggest to all our members that they have an EpiPen when they sting themselves in case they do have an allergic. Perhaps you can insist that they have one when you sell them bees. Now if you could just encourage them to join our organization to stay up to date on apitherapy (which includes bee venom therapy, royal jelly, honey, propolis and pollen) it would be outstanding!!!
    Thanks for helping these folks!
    Sara
    To: aasoffice@apitherapy.org
    Subject: selling bees

    I am a Michigan beekeeper and recently I have had many people contacting me to obtain bees for sting therapy. Do I need to see a prescription for these people to obtain bees from me to be sure that they are in a Doctors care because of the possibility of them having a reaction to the stings that could cost them their lives?
    Clint

    Bemrose's Bees
    Clinton Bemrose
    Mason, Michigan
    Near Lansing, MI

    **************************
    CMAC 2003
    The American Apitherapy Society¹s
    Charles Mraz Apitherapy Course
    July 10 July 13, 2003
    Los Angeles, California

    A hands-on course in apitherapy for beginners and
    Experienced apitherapists wishing to keep up to date.

    Starting with the reception the evening of Thursday, July 10 the AAS is offering their annual course in apitherapy. This course is designed for people new to apitherapy and for experienced apitherapists who are interested in learning the latest in apitherapy treatments. You will
    Have the opportunity to experience apitherapy -- hands-on.
    Your instructors will be interesting, enthusiastic people devoted to healing with natural products as well as an experienced team of apitherapists. The classes will be small; the atmosphere conducive to questions and dialogue. The course will cover the use of bee venom therapy, pollen, propolis and royal jelly. The course will culminate in
    An exam Sunday morning for those who are interested in receiving the Certificate of Knowledge.

    Registration for the course and materials:
    $275 for AAS members and $300 for non-members (includes a one year membership.) NOTE: Registration fees do not include hotel and meals.

    To register, send your payment (US dollars please money order or credit card) along with your name, address, phone, and email to us at the address below or fax it to use. (Don¹t email that¹s not a secure method for credit card information!)

    The hotel is the Four Points Sheraton at Los Angeles (LAX) International Airport. The Special AAS Room Rate is $74.00 per night, single or double occupancy so be certain to use the AAS name (Telephone: 800-529-4685) when reserving. The Four Points offers a free airport shuttle 24 hours a day. Please remember, July is tourism season in LA so reserve your room soon!

    We hope to see you in Los Angeles!

    Consider the Apitherapy CD from the international Apimondia Society!
    Most everything you would ever want to know about apitherapy with great graphics! $35. Plus shipping and handling. Order from our website: www.apitherapy.org.


    Sara A. Cornwall
    Executive Director
    American Apitherapy Society
    1209 Post Road
    Scarsdale, NY 10583-2023 USA

    Phone: 914-725-7944
    Fax: 914-723-0920
    E-Mail: aas.office@verizon.net

    Clint

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

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