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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Carp, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    123

    Question

    Hello,

    I wonder if there is a way (mathematical formula) to determine the honey density using the Refractometer Reading?

    I want use this information in order accurately determine the weight of honey in a barrel without actually weighting it.

    Thanks and Regards,

    Mahmoud

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    We use a Hydrometer to check the specific gravity of battery acid, can’t tell you how to figure weight by the specific gravity, maybe someone has the conversion for specific gravity to weight?
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    Well, if you know the percentage water, which
    you do when you use a refractometer, you SHOULD
    be able to estimate the weight versus some
    standard drum of honey at a "normal" moisture
    level.

    Wetter honey is going to be lighter, I suspect,
    as the "solids" would tend to be denser than
    water.

    Problem is, I don't ever put honey in a pail
    until I have it at an appropriate moisture
    level, so I can't say for sure. But you
    won't need to weigh too many drums of honey
    before you can draw a graph of moisture
    versus mass, assuming you fill your drums
    consistently. It is going to be a linear
    relationship, so graph the points, and
    draw a line that goes through the points,
    or if that is impossible, draw a line that
    "splits the difference" between the points
    that are above and below the line.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Clarksville, TN USA EEUU
    Posts
    131

    Post

    What i wonder is, when you take a sample how would you be sure you are getting a good sample.
    For example, the density might be greater near the surface due to ultra fine particulates...etc.
    Jason

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    890

    Post

    If you want to change Specific gravity to Density you simply Multiply the Specific gravity you got by 8.3224 (the density of water) and that will give you the density of the substance (which will be in #/gal).

    I knew those 5 years spent in the Lab wouldn't be Wasted.
    Rod

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    >when you take a sample how would you be sure you are getting a good sample

    You can’t without taking special care to mix the honey. Honeys in the same drum from different sources will have different moisture contents and thereby have different densities. A low moisture content honey will tend to layer under a higher moisture content honey. Also honey exposed to moist air will absorb water and form a dilute layer which will remain on the surface due to its lower density.

    The previous edition (36th) of ‘ABC & XYZ’ has a table on page 438 giving % moisture ranges, ºBrix, ºBaume, and specific gravities for the various moisture ranges. The % moisture ranges are listed from 13.0 to 21.0. The wt. at 21 % moisture for a gallon of honey is 11 lb. 10 oz. For 13 % moisture the weight is 12 lb. 1 oz.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Carp, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    123

    Post

    Well getting a “good” sample is another issue for sure, but I found that most of my honey is about 15% moisture, I think this is because the time I harvest (I always harvest one time a year) also the way I handle it is pretty much constant.

    Another thing is that I will be filling the barrel from a holding tank which holds three barrels of honey, so I thought if I will always fill a barrel when the holding tank is about ¾ full and I will measure the moisture half way of filling this should give me an accurate “fair” reading of the that particular barrel.

    Now it came the idea of using a Hydrometer which definitely I will also examine.

    [size="1"][ February 12, 2006, 03:14 AM: Message edited by: forestbee ][/size]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Carp, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    123

    Post

    Dick,

    Was it a linear relation between the moisture and weight? I assume it is, if this is case that’s pretty much solved my problem.

    Regards
    Mahmoud

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    Mahmoud,
    I don't know if the relation is linear or not, but for 15% moisture, the table in the ABC & XYZ book lists
    11 lb. 15 1/2 oz. per U.S. gallon at 20º C.

    [size="1"][ February 12, 2006, 11:06 AM: Message edited by: Dick Allen ][/size]

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