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Thread: Odd Question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Richmond, KY
    Posts
    12

    Post

    I know this might sound strange, but I'm looking for a safe way to kill a hive of bees, unless there is a better alternative I'm not aware of. Here's the situation; a friend has a corn grinder that a swarm of bees set up home in. He needs to grind corn to feed his cattle, so he doesn't want to use Raid or other pesticides. Is there something that produces a smoke that would get rid of them. I would try to move them but with the freezing temps right now, I don't see how they could possibly survive a transfer right now. Any help or ideas would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,593

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    Sulfur smoke will kill them and not leave any poisonous residue. Soap suds will also kill them and leave no poisonous residue.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    san antonio.texas USA
    Posts
    487

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    I think sulfur or soap would be better, but I have heard of people using a hose run from their truck exaust pipe to kill bees. New bees were replaced on the comb with no apparent ill effects, so I would guess it would be relatively safe.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
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    3,401

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    Stick with the soapy water. It is more "humane".

    Gassing bees is neither quick nor pretty,
    and it does not assure a complete kill.

    Anyone can spray water. Sulfur, cyanide,
    and even carbon monoxide take some skill,
    and present some risk to the person trying
    to handle them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Richmond, KY
    Posts
    12

    Post

    I really appreciate the help and information. I'll go with the soap and water (keep it simple). Thanks for the help!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    311

    Post

    An old timer told me once that smoke from burning human hair paralyzes bees. Can you try that and remove them or bee vac them somehow? Killing them seems like such a loss......

    J.R.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    233

    Post

    sounds like a large amount of human hair would be required.

    but it sounds intresting.

    what a waste of time though it sounds like...

    turn on the **** machine and use it. :-D

    (that would be my solution, cruel as it sounds, a dead bee is a dead bee?)
    \"You\'ve got to stop beating up your women because you can\'t find a job, because you didn\'t want to get an education and now you\'re (earning) minimum wage.\"<br /><br />-Bill Cosby

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    you might want to check your state laws because is is against the law to kill honey bees in Michigan and your state might have the same law.
    Clint
    Clinton Bemrose<br />just South of Lansing Michigan<br />Beekeeping since 1964

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    CO2 would be my choice to kill bees... provided you can mostly seal up where they live. Just leave a tank of carbone dioxide slowly leaking into their home, and they will suffocate. Paintball players and welders will have some CO2.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Centreville, VA, USA
    Posts
    50

    Post

    DeadAhead: What happened? What did you end up doing?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    8

    Post

    I have some input, and since I am an exterminator, you may find some interest in it.

    Doing this yourself enables you to sidestep the law. According to FIFRA, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide act, the site must be listed on the label. Clearly, the suggestions for using homemade concoctions don't have labels, so the legality is a bit moot.

    However, the use of the term pesticide creates a key misunderstanding. Sulfur and carbon dioxide are pesticides. The fact that you may find these products not being sold as pesticides, doesn't change that fact. The benefit to using a product sold and labeled as a pesticide is that first, efficacy must be proven, second, environmental precautions must be clear, and third use instructions with safety data must also be on the label. It is a felony for a licensed exterminator to use a product in a way that violates the label.

    Now here's more. Most pesticides list bees as an environmental precaution, but not a target pest. Further, I only know one that lists the bee hive as an acceptable site.

    While this is a bit of a catch 22, I don't think anyone would ever file a complaint.

    Regarding the choice of chemicals to use, carbon dioxide would be effective as mentioned, but a little hard to orchestrate. I can't imagine a way to determine if it will work except for trying. Then you have to find the cylinder and work out a way to get it into the tree and killing the bees before you run out of gas. Theoretically, it would work quickly, like 45 minutes or less, and there would be no residual. Since it is heavier than air, it may not get to the hive inside the tree.

    Sulfur on the other hand will leave a residue. This residue will have to washed off the equipment. I can't imagine this being easy to get the pesticide to the target efficiently. I can imagine many treatments to do the job.

    A botanical grade pyrethrin aerosol might be your best bet. It is easily found and reasonably priced. It is very toxic to bees, but also usable in food processing environments. There is no residual. Toxicity in mammals is very low. This is what I use. I select a product that does NOT shoot 25 feet, but rather has a high vapor pressure so it will fill the hive cavity. The product I use comes with a long straw that can be pushed into the entry so all the gas goes into the nest. The down side is that it may take more than one treatment to get all the bees.

    Another product that is very effective may be a restricted use product where you are. Aluminum phosphide is a fumigant. It is labeled for use in trees on bees. The honey can be used as feed for other bees, but not sold for food. This product is used to fumigate silos to get rid of beetles and such in grain etc. before the product goes to market. There is no residual, but it is a dangerous product. Farmers in CO can get a private use permit and buy it for their personal use. This would be the easiest and most effect of the treatments.

    Too bad you have to exterminate them.

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