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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    >> As far as Mike being hunted down, I suspect
    >> that he was not stung, but head-butted by
    >> a "Kamakazz-bee"

    > Michael, are you *sure* you were stung?
    > How sure are you?

    I meant that the reason he was "hunted down"
    started with a head-butting, and this "marked"
    him for subsequent stinging. Sorry I was less
    than clear.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,442

    Post

    >I meant that the reason he was "hunted down"
    started with a head-butting, and this "marked"
    him for subsequent stinging. Sorry I was less
    than clear.

    That was my assumption at the time of the attack and at the time of your statment also.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >That was my assumption at the time of the attack and at the time of your statment also.

    Well, mine too, I was just being a jerk. Sorry [img]smile.gif[/img]

    But Michael, you also said "Back when my Buckfasts went postal they definitely recognized me. They would hunt me down". Now they may have marked you, probably did mark you, but it seems like you feel they also recognized you.

    I'm only belaboring this point because it seems to be one of those issues where you're on one side or the other with no clear scientific evidence supporting either position. True, saying "my bees recognize me" smacks of anthropomorphism, but that's not to say that all anthropomorphisms are categorically wrong. Most are. One could be, purely by chance, actually correct.

    Besides, anthropomorphizing can be fun, even if it doesn't have a sound basis in science [img]smile.gif[/img] I happen to believe bees can recognize individuals and actually react to them in different ways. Whether it be by sight, sound, smell, "vibes" or some combination, I don't know.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    941

    Post

    We have, for many years, included the admonition that bees do not "know you" during the Willamette Valley Beekeepers Association's annual Beeschool.
    We believe that it is important to help new beekeepers gain the concept of the bees RESPONSE to STIMULI, and behavior patterns as early on as possible.
    Anthropomorphism, superstition, urban legends and the like may be fun for some, (not me) but can distract the newer beekeeper from the Volumes of vital info yet to digest.
    Having blathered all of that out, I recently attended an event where I mozied up to a group of newer beekeepers having a discussion about how benefitial it is to talk to your bees.
    They were all nodding in the affirmative and commenting on how talking and singing, really calms and reassures the bees. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >They were all nodding in the affirmative and commenting on how talking and singing, really calms and reassures the bees.

    How sweet. But interestingly enough, there may be something to it- not that talking calms or reassures the bees, but it might calm and reassure the beekeper, and THAT could have a profound effect on how the bees respond to them.

    Surely, if you go to the yard in a bad mood, annoyed and teed-off and muttering under your breath about the blasted bees, they're going to react to that. Or shouting at them. That doesn't help [img]smile.gif[/img]

    My wife talks to the bees. Nothing specific, usually just a sing-song kind of thing. She loves the bees, and the bees seem to respond to that. She works without gloves and rarely gets stung. When she does, she apologizes profusely to them.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,442

    Post

    Saying what it seems like and saying what it probably really is may be two different things.

    "Contradiction is not a sign of falsity, nor the lack of contradiction a sign of truth." Blaise Pascal
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    Maybe it just my imagination, but it does *seem* to be the new folks who are first to get stung.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    I am sure my bees know who I am . Tall, fat, bald guy. I know they have a picture hanging up in each and every hive with my face on it. It reads:

    "reward for the stinging of the big fat bald guy who wears white"
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
    Posts
    529

    Post

    Do you think bees sting more democrat or republican?

    Should I wear a Bush or Clinton mask?

    Actually I think if I wear "Donkey" from Shrek it would be less than either.

    Purhaps if I get a Bin Laden mask, my bees would never find me?

    [size="1"][ December 12, 2005, 10:48 PM: Message edited by: NW IN Beekeeper ][/size]
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    <I know my bees look at my face. And they go for the eyes when they get mad.>
    <The instinctive preference for stinging around
    eyes and other dark areas on light backgrounds
    is another issue entirely.>

    That doesn't work for me. I'm black. And I really believe they know that an eye is an eye. Or there is an instinct to attack the weak spot. And can you honestly say your bees don't hover around your face looking at you?

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    havana fl
    Posts
    1,352

    Post

    does anyone talk to there bees by danceing.
    I’m really not that serious

  12. #32
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    "does anyone talk to there bees by danceing"

    I think so. I drove by a beekeeper in a field one day. He wasn't wearing a veil or gloves. Just tee shirt and shorts. All of a sudden he started doing a little dance, waving his hands in the air and stomping his feet.
    [img]smile.gif[/img]

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    does anyone talk to there bees by danceing.
    Yes, Kevin Costner. No, wait that was wolves.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,442

    Post

    >I think so. I drove by a beekeeper in a field one day. He wasn't wearing a veil or gloves. Just tee shirt and shorts. All of a sudden he started doing a little dance, waving his hands in the air and stomping his feet.

    Yea, I've done that dance...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    IÂ’m with Hawk, the only thing they seem to recognize on my face is my nose! It must look like a bullÂ’s-eye to them because when ever I get stung in the face thatÂ’s were I get it. I have often thought it was perhaps because itÂ’s such a distinguished looking nose.
    My wife was working our strawberry patch and claimed that my honeybees were buzzing her, at first I thought a hornet nest might be the guilty party. So I started to help her and sure enough they started to buzz her and not me? I told her that they knew who their daddy was, she told me to move them away from the patch or I would have to weed the strawberries alone, I moved them the next morning.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Linton, In
    Posts
    82

    Post

    Yeah, I did that dance almost 30 years ago when I took some other bees out of a house.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    1,649

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    From the abstract:

    “Performance was evaluated in non-rewarded trials and bees discriminated the target face from a similar distractor with greater than 80% accuracy.”

    ItÂ’s amazing that by changing a word or two can give the above a completely different meaning.

    “After as many as 10 training sorties, most bees picked the correct face only 80% of the time.”

  18. #38

    Post

    I talk and sing to my bees too. I'm a new beekeeper who started in April 2005 with 2 packages on a rooftop in New York City. To date, I have been stung only three times. Stings 1 & 2 were the day I hived my packages. Sting 3 was from a honey who crawled up the leg of my bee suit months later.

    Call me crazy, but I think talking to them and singing to them calms them.

    When I talk to them, I mostly tell them what I'm about to do and why, like "OK, honeys, Now I'm going to pull out some of your frames and look for your Queen Bee, and make sure she's doing OK for you.

    Uh oh, you girls made some extra honeycombs here, and I have to use my hive tool to break it, so I can take the frame out. Don't get mad now! I gotta do what I gotta do, to make sure you girls stay healthy! That's my job.

    Uh-huh. Uh-huh. Good bees - you let me do what I need to do! Good bees... Good bees...

    Ooh, there she is! What a big fat sassy Queen Bee you are!Walking on the frame! You are regal! You're like the Queen of England! Yes you are! My very own Queen Bee! You're so pretty!

    Ooh, look at your perfect brood pattern! OK, I won't bother you anymore. I'm gonna put this frame back in the hive and say goodbye for now. Good bees! Oh, you are my sweet honey bees. Sweet honey bees! I love you bees"

    After I close the hive, I sit and watch them go in and out for a while. They are like little jewels. When they come in loaded with pollen I make a fuss too, like "Ooh, look at you! Look at that pretty yellow pollen you brought! Ooh - look at her! Your sister! She brought some orange pollen! Ooh, you bees are so sweet!"

    I work without gloves. I'm also careful to not wear anything fragranced (perfume, hairspray, etc) and I use unscented deodorant.

    OTOH, I have read that bees don't like you if you've imbibed alcohol. One summer afternoon, I indulged in an ice cold beer while working my bees, and they were OK with that And a male friend who needed a shower (after working out) hung out beside me, also drinking beer. The bees completely ignored him.
    I (heart) Honeybees

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,442

    Post

    >Call me crazy, but I think talking to them and singing to them calms them.

    As a Lakota I often talk to a lot of creatures. Quite often they are far enough away that I know they can't hear my voice. Lakota would likely call this "praying" to them. Not in the sense that you think they are spiritually superior and you're begging for something, but in the sense that you are showing them respect and communicating on a spirtual level and not on a physical one. Voice is probably not the level you are communicating with your bees. [img]smile.gif[/img] For Lakota, all these kinds of communication are ended by saying "Mitaku'yasin" which is a contraction of "Mitakuye oyasin" which means "we are all relatives".
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    {And I really believe they know that an eye is an eye. Or there is an instinct to attack the weak spot.}

    My experiance would make me wonder if it is natural selection. The bees that tended sting bears around the eyes, their main predator besides us, are the the ones who didn't get eaten and who's genes survived. It may also be in relation to the location near the nose and mouth since bees are somewhat incited by breath. (Possibly more so Hawks than others being at high altitude and with shorter, more desperate breathing whilst making a tactical retreat from an angry hive!)

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