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  1. #1
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    Now that temps are from 45-75 should I go ahead and put feeder frames (plastic frame-sized containers that replace frames for sugar syrup) in yet?
    If so, where? In the hive body, super and how many to use?
    Where do they go in the body? On the side, in the center or just off-center?
    thanks,
    Jason

  2. #2

    Post

    I am not sure that I would leave them in all winter for several concerns. I put scraps of wood and pinestraw in so the bees have something to land on, in weak hives this trach seemed to allow a greater pest presence. I have also heard that bees will not move laterally in a hive to get food in starvation cold temperatures. If I were to use them now I would feed hard, heavy, and fast so the bees can store it where they want to. Place the frame feeder on an end, perhaps the sunny side if a possibility. If your style of lid allows, you can then just crack and slide the cover to a side, allowing enough room to feed the feeder (over winter if needed) without letting all the heat out.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    I get the idea that maybe something is missing. Do you need to feed? and if so, what have you been doing up till now? Are you just feeding because you think you need to? Are you feeding because of being light in the hive or for another reason?

    I make it a point at this time of the season to have the bees already situated with where they want things. That includes all of the frames being in place. I wont mess witht he inside of the hive pertaining to frames since about the beginning of Sept. Feed above the inner cover using another box. Easier to refill and not bother the cluster. You can actually put a pail feeder type right over the inner cover hole. If needed, put some sugar candy patties inside for added emergency feed. Maybe a pollen patty also.

  4. #4
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    A couple of my hives are a bit light and I have heard that they need at least one super to get through the winter.
    JG in TN

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    One frame feeder doesn't equal one super. I prefer a top feeder so I can refill without disturbing the bees. The Rapid Feeder from www.beeworks.com is my favorite. Next would be a miller feeder, but they have too much surface evaporating water. If you have to have a frame feeder, I like the ones from Brushy Mt. or Betterbee. The Brushy Mt. ones have a smaller fill area with a hardware cloth ladder so the bees don't drown as much and they don't bulge like the plastic ones. If you use a board feeder it goes all the way to one side.

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