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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Lightbulb

    if necessity is the mother of invention,then laziness must be an aunt or close cousin.i've gotten tired of making syrup,cleaning the feeders,etc.so this is what i've been doing for the past few months.above the inner cover i spread a good amount of granulated sugar(over a pound) in a circle around the opening in the inner cover,i then slowly and carefully pour a thick sugar syrup or honey along the granulated sugar,not too much that it runs down into the hive or along the sides,most is soaked up by the granualted sugar,the bees take an immediate interest in this and end up using the granulated sugar much more readliy than if you just use the granulated sugar by itself.i then put a 2nd inner cover over this and add a sheet of newspaper above it to absorb moisture.working pretty good.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Sounds like a dandy idea HH. I'm doing something similar but I haven't added honey to the sugar.

    I will do this, sure as shootin, I will.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Anderson,IN,USA
    Posts
    130

    Post

    "pour a thick sugar syrup or honey along the granulated sugar"

    This sound very interesting.
    I'm probably making this more difficult than it is but I'm a newbee and will ask anyway. Do you pour the granulated sugar in a ring around the inner cover hole and then pour the syrup in a ring on the inside, outside or directly on the lb of sugar?
    Thank you

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i usually pour it syrup/honey on the inside of the ring to get the bees interested,being careful not to let a bunch run down into the hive.i'll also sometimes make a little trench with my finger in the sugar and pour it into that so it soaks in well.most hives aren't exactly level so watch which way the stuff flows and pour so it'll run against the sugar and soak up well.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Frankfort, Kentucky
    Posts
    399
    This sounds a great idea. I wiil use it at my next bee class. Thanks.

    ------------------
    If a job is worth doing - Then do it well

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i'm still using this technique,it works well,i've found that if i put an inrie shim above the inner cover,i can fit 4-5 lbs. of sugar in there.the sugar also seems to absorb alot of moisture in the hive,this softens up the sugar for the bees,and keeps the hive from getting damp.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oregon, North coast
    Posts
    12

    Post

    I must ask why are we feeding so much this time of year? You should of left 80 lbs. of honey to get them thur the winter. If you have more then just a few hives sugar is not cheap.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    Sugar is alot cheaper than honey. 5# of sugar $1.99 vs. selling 5# of honey @ $15.00

    That a side, I leave my bees with enough stores. But, I also feed my bees whenever I can and as much as I can. A hive that has more stores than it needs will have a jump start on next season and be able to expand. It will also give you a head start with making splits with stores already to go.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i agree with mountain camp,a few lbs of sugar is worth the investment,i've seen them store it in cells near the cluster, this could be critical during a severe cold snap.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Sad

    Mine were short on stores and I'm using fondant and sugar. Alot of bees but no honey, don' want to loose them so sugar is a cheap way to go if it means survival.

    ------------------
    'WHEN WE CLOSE OUR EYES WE ALL LOOK THE SAME' GWPW 03

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    438

    Post

    What a fine idea! I've been using the sugar, but adding a bit of syrup to get them interested is a wonderful thought. Thanks!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    949

    Post

    Do you have to plug the top cover notch to prevent robbing? The smell of open honey with nothing in bloom might invite all sorts of unwanted guests.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    I forget to plug the notch once. What a mess of dead bees!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Beverly, Mass
    Posts
    303

    Post

    Could you use candy instead and drip the syrup
    on top.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,020

    Post

    We have started to use bakers' fondant instead of sugar syrup, which was a right royal pain in the butt to mix, pump and transport to our apiaries. Early days, but I see no reason to go back to syrup feeding.

    Peter Edwards gives a strong list of reasons to use fondant here: http://www.stratford-upon-avon.frees...es/Fondant.htm

  16. #16
    twind59 Guest

    Big Grin

    I'm glad someone mentioned fondant. It's supposed to be above 50 here in Indy tomorrow and I was thinking about a supplimental feeding, just to help preserve honey stores, and was wondering about just whipping up a quick batch of thin fondant and placing some "above" the inner cover near the center hole. Perhaps feeding fondant at this time would be the preferred method...feeding syrup, some say, can lead to brood rearing. Any thoughts, comments?
    Thanks
    Barry
    Indianapolis

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,020

    Post

    I'm in south west UK here - temperature a few degrees above freezing. We don't feed syrup later than September, as if it's too cold bees cannot dry it out and it will ferment, causing dysentery, dead bees, etc.

    Fondant can be placed on top of frames in thin slices or on an excluder in greater bulk, with an eke or a shallow super to provide clearance. The bees don't need to dry it out, so it can't ferment or cause them any problems, as far as I can see.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Hills, CA USA
    Posts
    457

    Post

    Bakers fondant, Could someone be kind enough to post the recipe for making, baker fondant that they have made and used? I would appreciate it.
    Walt

  19. #19
    twind59 Guest

    Post

    My recipe for fondant is just a qt of water into which is dissolved 5 lb sugar. Heat to 260-270 degrees. I did this last night then just poured it out onto a wax paper covered cookie sheet to harden.

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