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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,642

    Post

    Sheesh, what a crew. I remember ripping the star wheels off of punch card machines when keying programs onto cards. I could actually program in COBOL at one time. I also remember dropping stacks of cards before I figured out that I could index them and have them sorted. IBM360s with blinking lights. Gigantic disk packs, elevated floors....
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    963

    Post

    My very first brush with a computer was in the 70s helping a friend finish a lab in college.
    We fed boxes of punch cards through a card reader as imput to an IBM Computer as big as a car.
    Fortran, I'm sure.
    All of that just to make a banner in which the large letters were made of the same typed letter.
    The assignment was ,"Sign Generation".
    Been hooked since.
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Post

    >And no one over the age of 12 codes in BASIC.

    What do the people over the age of 12 code in?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >punch cards

    Yeah. Going forth meekly to the High Priest of the Console.. waiting in line with other poor unfortunates.. and finally prostrating yourself before HIM, offering up your pile of cards... into the reader.. only to find there was a bug..

    Ah, the Good Old Days.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    <What do the people over the age of 12 code in?>

    Pascal!

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    Trevor,
    The regulations have became tougher on small hive beetle at the border. I understand many of you took the trip to California paid for by the California almond growers and were offered RV's to stay in , use of company forklifts and pickups!
    They downplayed the trouble at the California border didn't they? Let me enlighten you.

    The almond growers want bees. They care little about fireants, AHB or SHB or your expense at the border crossing.

    The current California *powers that be* think they can keep fire ants out when they are already in California. AHB is already in California and PLENTY of small hives beetles are in California.

    The largest import of SHB came in 1998 with the first Bell sell out. The second sellout of close to 100,000 hives (2004/2005)all ended up in California almond pollination . I bet SHB was in every hive.

    Pressure is coming from California & northern tier beekeepers to wage a fight against SHB coming into California.
    Quarantines have NEVER worked to control a beekeeping pest in the U.S. so far! If they wanted to control SHB entering California the year 1998 would have been the year to try!

    The reality is I have looked through many a hive in Florida as I travel to Florida every year at least once. Small hive beetle can be seen in about every hive. Trevor ( you and I have talked before) you know I speak the truth and will say the truth no matter what. I have got no hidden agenda. All I want to do is inform beekeepers!

    Florida beekeepers beware this year at the California inspection station. Go through Monday _ Friday in the daytime and NOT on weekends. At least during those hours you can get information and action.
    What the almond growers and other beekeepers have told you carries zero weight with those guys.

    Once pulled to the side prepare for a long wait. Bring a lunch as no place to even get food or fuel. They have got a water fountain & restroom.

    This year for the first time they are looking for SHb and there is no tolerance! Loads will be turned away (with the current Q rating)! it would be better to get caught with fire ants as you can go to the clean up area and got through the stupid fire ant removing process (for a big fee!).
    In addition they are looking for five other ant species this year! The inspectors held up a Florida load a few years ago because of two ants (causing half the load to die)when the ants turned out to not even be fire ants.

    Many commercial migratory beekeepers have not been treated fairly at the California inspection station.

    We go through with paperwork saying we are from a fire ant free state so we sail through.

    My friends from the south face big problems if pulled to the side at the inspection station.
    Now read carefully again Trevor what was said at the California meeting about the *new* SHB regulations and tell your friends.

    quote:
    "At the moment ( my friends say will not change untill somebody with brains changes the rating and only then after huge tie ups at the border) ,given the Q rating assigned to the SHB, if ONE or more SHB are found on a load, the load will be shipped out of state "under quarantine notice".

    If the CDFA rating is changed to a b or C level. things will be a bit more lenient.

    RIGHT NOW THE Q rating stands.

    A turned around semi load for SHb will cost the Florida beekeeper approx. two dollars a mile both ways. Do the math!

    Your friend,
    Bob Harrison
    Bob Harrison

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    Trevor,
    I have got friends which made a bunch of money hauling Coors beer to the east coast years ago.
    I have even got a picture of a driver sitting in a trailer on top of a load of pallets of Coors beer drinking a beer with a Kansas City landmark in the background.
    The movie "Bandit" was based on true experiences of those guys.
    Those same people will get loads of bees into California *if* the powers that be do not ease the "Q" rating down. Why not be reasonable about the issue?

    A turned around load may not be a big deal to the California inspection station but an out of pocket loss of close to $20,000 in trucking and loss of 10-15% of queens could put serious hurt on the Florida beekeeper!

    I personally would not take the chance shipping from Florida to California until the rating is dropped from "Q". Now is the time for Florida beekeepers to get the regulations changed. Not while sitting at the border!
    Bob Harrison

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Post

    george ferguson said:
    Yeah. Going forth meekly to the High Priest of the Console.. waiting in line with other poor unfortunates.. and finally prostrating yourself before HIM, offering up your pile of cards... into the reader.. only to find there was a bug..

    tecumseh replies:
    yep geoge you pretty much caught the feeling of the moment... or your last line could be...

    only to discover (after the fact) that you had one card out of it's proper order with your 10,000 other cards...

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >only to discover (after the fact) that you had one card out of it's proper order

    Yet another unpleasant scenario. Glad those days are behind us and everyone who wants one has a compiler on their desktop.

    Long Live Interpreted Languages!
    Dulcius ex asperis

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