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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
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    2,269

    Post

    Check out the latest:
    http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/facult...NovDec2005.pdf
    It has info from the State meeting.Interesting oxalic research,latest about the anti-varroa fungus(not good), sucrocide(not good).Also important info for almond pollinators.It appears that shb infested hives will be sent back ,as long as the current 'Q' rating is in effect.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,985

    Post

    I am sitting on a very old computer platform and the above link just will not work for me (hopefully santa will take this into consideration and remedy the problem fairly soon). I would like to see exactly what was said about fungus, sucrocide and oxalic. Could you post it in a more direct fashion.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,269

    Post

    Tecumseh:It works on this old computer,but I am not computer literate enough to know how to cut and paste a pdf file.There are some experts here who could figure it out,though.(hint)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,625

    Post

    Tecumseh, here's the article on Oxalic/Sucrocide. The piece on the fungus concluded: "Unfortunately, there wasn’t very much difference between the controls and the treatments. Only CheckMite+® and Apiguard® made a significant dent in the mite population."

    Cheers,

    George-

    ------------------------------------------
    Oxalic acid for mite control
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    graduate student, Nick Aliano, reported on
    his studies using oxalic acid to reduce
    Varroa populations. Nick stated that the
    strong dicarboxylic acid is available in two
    formulations: anhydrous, that is hard to
    obtain and dihydrate that is pretty easy to
    find.
    Oxalic acid is a common plant
    chemical that kills or repels phytophagous
    arthropods. There can be 300-17,000 ppm
    in vegetables. It also is found naturally
    occurring in honey at levels between 8 and
    300 ppm.
    Europeans have been using oxalic
    acid for some time in mite control programs,
    but it is not registered in most countries.
    Those countries that allow its use decided on
    50 milliequivalents of free acid as an
    acceptable tolerance level in honey. If used
    as recommended, that criterion is easily met.
    Beekeepers can apply oxalic acid by
    spraying, trickling (preferred European
    method) or evaporating. They often get up
    to 90% effectiveness in broodless colonies.
    Spraying and trickling are done with acid
    dissolved in sugar syrup. Nick’s lab
    currently is working with our federal
    government to obtain permission to apply a
    specific concentration of oxalic acid in sugar
    syrup to our bees. The treatment will be
    directed at broodless colonies in autumn or
    early winter, but when temperatures are
    above freezing. Although the diluted acid is
    not too dangerous, rubber gloves and
    goggles will be required during formulation
    and application of the solution.
    Nick studied the effects of oxalic
    acid on mites in this country, to determine if
    results around Lincoln, Nebraska, are
    similar to European results. He used only
    the spray and trickle treatments. In the
    spray treatments, the boxes were sprayed
    between the combs from the top and bottom
    of the supers. The trickle treatments were
    applied between the top bars from the top,
    only. Sticky boards were used to determine
    mite fall and adult bees were processed in
    alcohol to determine the level of infestation
    of adult bees.
    Both the spray and trickle methods
    reduced the number of mites significantly
    (and dramatically) compared to the controls.
    The spray reduced the mites by 86% and the
    trickle by 82%. The bees were not affected
    negatively by a single treatment. Meanwhile,
    the control mite population increased
    by 6%.
    Since the researchers concluded that
    the trickle method is quicker and easier than
    spraying, that will be the application which
    is recommended to EPA. The estimated cost
    of treatment is about 4-5 cents per hive. It
    also was stated that the solution works best
    when freshly mixed. It losses its effect
    relatively quickly at room temperature, but
    can be stored refrigerated for a day or two.
    Nick also compared efficacy of mite
    control with treatments of Sucrocide® and
    three concentrations of oxalic acid in sugar
    syrup. Each comb was removed and
    sprayed with Sucrocide. The oxalic acid
    solutions were trickled between the frames.
    All treatments were repeated at three week
    intervals.
    Again, levels of infestation of adult
    bees were measured before treatments and
    two weeks after the final treatment. Interestingly,
    the levels of mite infestation in the
    controls dropped off by about 40%. The
    oxalic acid treatments were better: between
    50 and 60% reduction, but not directly
    correlated to concentration. The levels of
    infestation in the Sucrocide treatment
    increased a bit. There was no measurable
    difference in bee or brood populations in
    any of the treatments.
    The conclusions drawn from these
    latter studies are that: 1. oxalic acid and
    Sucrocide treatments do not work very well
    when brood is present in the hive and 2.
    summer bees can tolerate larger amounts of
    oxalic acid than previously reported in the
    literature for autumn and winter mite
    control.
    To determine the value of treating
    packages with Sucrocide and oxalic acid
    solutions, the researchers collected a very
    large screened box of infested adult bees,
    mixed them up, then filled 30 packages. In
    this case treatments were spayed through the
    screen onto the bees. Eight hours later, the
    packages were installed in hives. Adult bee
    samples were collected and processed in
    alcohol one and three weeks after
    installation.
    The reduction in levels of mite
    infestation was 1% for the controls, about
    32% for the Sucrocide and nearly 63% for
    the oxalic acid treatment.
    A final study to determine how the
    acid appears to kill mites was conducted
    using an elaborate system of modified hive
    components that allowed only vapor, food
    sharing or individual contact between
    treated and non-treated mite infested bees.
    It appears as though the mode of action of
    the oxalic acid solution is by direct body
    contact.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
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    Post

    thank ya' george...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    >I am sitting on a very old computer platform and the above link just will not work for me

    Tecumseh, what are you using--a Commodore 64?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    915

    Post

    Dick, I think that you and I and one other person that I know are the only remaining people on the planet that have a working knowledge of the C-64.
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    10 PRINT “Enter your name”
    20 INPUT N$
    30 IF N$ = “Harry” THEN PRINT “Hello” N$
    40 IF N$ < > “Harry” THEN PRINT “Hello” N$ “You’re not Harry”
    50 END

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,191

    Post

    I have about a dozen old commodore 64 books and a working C64 sitting in front of me. I've been helping my son adapt some of the basic programs to run on qbasic on a PC. The changes are fairly simple. At one time, I was pretty good with assembler on a C64. It was never much use commercially but I had loads of fun playing around.

    Fusion

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    915

    Post

    10 PRINT “Enter your name”
    20 FOR CT = 1 TO 10
    30 INPUT N$
    40 IF N$ = “Dick” THEN PRINT N$ "is a beekeeper"
    50 IF N$ < > “Dick” THEN PRINT N$ "is a beehaver"
    60 NEXT CT
    70 END

    [size="1"][ December 17, 2005, 08:17 AM: Message edited by: HarryVanderpool ][/size]
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > I think that you and I and one other person
    > that I know are the only remaining people on the
    > planet that have a working knowledge of the C-64.

    I still have my old C-64, and it works fine,
    thank you. I also have my IMSAI (Circa 1975),
    my Digital Equipment PDP-8e (Circa 1970), and
    a mint condition Apple II. Can't bear to throw
    them out, so they stay racked in a corner of
    the basement to show kids what we had to work
    with (switch registers and working in Octal for
    Pete's sake!) when they come over and complain
    about how they really need a new video card with
    several gigs more memory to play the latest game.

    And no one over the age of 12 codes in BASIC. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    http://netadmintools.com/html/1passwd.man.html

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    S.E. Oklahoma
    Posts
    337

    Post

    C-64.....man that brings back memories of the wonderful days dreaming of the upgrade to a TRS-80

    David

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Clear Lake, WI / Sebring, FL
    Posts
    616

    Post

    The way I understand it is that if the hives that have beetles are going into counties that are already infected, they wont be turned back.
    Also you are suposed to use OA every week to kill the most mites when brood is in the hive, not every three weeks.
    Clear Lake Wi. / Sebring Fl.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,269

    Post

    That seems sensible enough.We know the county inspectors have been looking for shb to see where it is ,but I havent heard the results.Seems one could call the county ag dept. and ask, if interested.I know shb have been brought in on pollinating hives before.I still havent seen one(and no ahb either-my bees are as gentle as lambs-most of the time )

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    Jim,
    Did you say PDP8? I cut my teeth on a PDP8 at the college I went to. We stored a program on punched rolls of paper. I actually wrote a program that would play blackjack and give you the odds of winning the different strategies. All in Basic.

    Dickm

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,625

    Post

    Love old computer stuff. Got a ton of it. I've still got the Model 33 ASR teletypwriter that I used to play with at my dad's office back in the early 60's, and rolls and rolls of paper and tape for it. Also have the 110 baud Anderson Jacobsen acoustic modem (the kind you stick a telephone handset in). I actually used to use it to connect to online services and bulletin boards back.. oh.. a long time ago.

    I've also got a pair of german T-68's dating from probably the late 40's. I bet nobody here knows what they are...

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,019

    Post

    Now you are really showing your age

    In the late '50s my father (co-inventor of Pulse Code Modulation - the first working multi-channel telecommunication protocol, that eventually made the internet possible) used to bring home components that I built into radios, oscillators, etc. Can't be the same working with chips.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,625

    Post

    >Now you are really showing your age

    Proudly [img]smile.gif[/img]

    >co-inventor of Pulse Code Modulation

    Hrm.. your father and my father may have been on some of the same standards committees.. My father is credited with convincing the American Standards Association that upper AND lower case should be included in the ASCII code; if IBM had had their way, WE'D ALL BE YELLING ALL THE TIME [img]smile.gif[/img] What else... he's the reason there are * and # keys on the telephone, for what that is worth [img]smile.gif[/img]

    George-

    [size="1"][ December 17, 2005, 05:03 PM: Message edited by: George Fergusson ][/size]
    Dulcius ex asperis

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    I was going to point out to dickm that he was showing his age talking about punch cards and BASIC(We used FORTRAN when we punched cards), but I see some of you guys really are actually old.

    [size="1"][ December 17, 2005, 05:00 PM: Message edited by: Dick Allen ][/size]

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,985

    Post

    dick allen ask:
    Tecumseh, what are you using--a Commodore 64?

    tecumseh replies:
    no just a lowly mac which actually has more than enough capacity, it is just poor old mac is software challanged and his hard drive is(now how can you possible say this in a delicate way) a fixin' to go south. Yes friends, I am afraid poor mac is very swiftly loosing his mind.

    all fortran, basic and punch cards now that does bring back memories. I do recall the days when the biggest geek on campus was the guy with the biggest box (and sometimes boxes) of punch card. kidda of a status thing in its day.

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