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Thread: swarm

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Clearwater, Florida
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    7

    Exclamation

    I have a swarm of italian honey bees and i am
    not schooled in capturing a swarm I have cut the branch out of the tree but how do i get the bee's into a hive?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
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    260

    Post

    The easiest and quickest answer is to just shake them in after you've taken out the frames. Put as much of the swarm in the box, and gently but forcefully shake them--like your going to forcefully tap something with a hammer. Be sure you get the queen. And be sure the queen did not get lost under the brood box. This happened to me once and the next day my bees were gone.
    Funny thing, I "knew" the queen was under there by the way the bees were acting. By the time I went out to rectify it it was too late.
    Good luck!
    Denise

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    She's right. Just shake them in and put on the lid. Then watch. Sometimes the queen isn't there or they all (queen and all) decide to try it again. Sometimes it takes 20 minutes to an hour for them all to cluster on a branch again. I've had some I shook into box three or four times before it "took".

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
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    7

    Post

    You guys are great.I still need to get a hive it will be about mid week or the end of the week do you think that they will be ok just on the limb till then.
    I'll tell you I inherited a hive and I know not much I have added 2 supers to this hive and it is full of bee's.. I had two swarms last year and had to have them removed. But I want to try to save this swarm. Do you know of any sources good for beginners.
    kmbruno

  5. #5
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    I was struck my the amusing image of
    someone typing on a keyboard with one
    hand, the original question, while
    holding a branch with the swarm attached
    in the other hand.

    People ask me why I wear a cellphone on
    my hip when I go out on swarm calls.
    I reply that "911" is on speed dial,
    and the odds of me breaking BOTH arms
    in a fall from a tree are fairly low.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
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    716

    Post

    Use one of those supers as they need to be hived now or they will leave and find their own home. You could put them in a cardboard box with small hole open for flight, but then you will get practise of moving free hanging combs into frames. As I have done this and let them be one summer after dad got rid of his hives as I was a teenager. They left the next summer or died from mights but I did not see any dead bes inside to speak of.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Arnold, MD USA
    Posts
    48

    Post

    It is not likely that they will be "on the limb" more than 2-3 days. You can capture the swarm in a cardboard box until your hive equiptment arrives. Cut a couple of 6"x6" square holes in the sides of the box and replace them with screen, for ventilation. Just shake the bees into the box as described earlier, and seal up the lid somehow. You will need to feed them periodically with sugar syrup, lightly sprayed into the screen, (don't soak them with it). Keep the box in a somewhat cool place so that they don't get overheated. They want to be in a hive, not a cardboard box, so get one as soon as you can. Swarm catching is a lot of fun. Good luck!

    I have learned to keep a complete hive on standby for just such an occasion.

    Your local deptartment of agriculture can refer you to a local beekeeping club, where you can get some decent advice, and possibly some "on-site" help.

    Hillbilly is right. Just hive them in one of your supers.

    [This message has been edited by bill holmes (edited March 14, 2004).]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
    Posts
    7

    Post

    alrightyyy now it work they are now in box with 6x6 holes covered with screen. now do you have a formula for sugar syrup i have heated one cup of water with about 3/4 cup sugar. what do you think and how often do I feed
    kmbruno

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Bridgewater VT. USA
    Posts
    238

    Cool

    I would keep feeding them this way untill they stop cleaning it up right away. I would mix the formula 2:1 sugarater but they are going to want to build comb if they stay in the box very long, you can tie anything they do make into frames once you get them a hive.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
    Posts
    7

    Smile

    THANKS TO ALL for your excellant advise it all worked out great. I got the bees in the box.
    Monday I was telling a coworker about my weekend and he informed me that a friend of his was looking for bees to start his hive.
    So tuesday the bees had a new home.
    My new hive arrived on friday so at least I am prepared .
    It is hard learning this way though.
    Thanks to all again
    kmbruno

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Post

    >It is hard learning this way though.

    There is another way? I think this IS how you learn.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
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    Gee thanks MB I was hoping there was 12 golden rules to bee keeping. I inherited this hive. I was keeping it for a friend that had to move. Move he did but the bee's have not . 3 years. Thank Bill Gates and the internet for what I do know.
    I have harvested the honey for two years but I think I need to requeen the hive. This week I opened the hive and I believe I have shb. So correct me if I am wrong in my thinking but I will throw away frames of honey. I treated the surrounding ground with Goldstar. I have two supers on it now I think I need to burn those but what of the bottom part of the hive should I burn it also and what of the bees honey? Help please.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >This week I opened the hive and I believe I have shb. So correct me if I am wrong in my thinking but I will throw away frames of honey.

    First, I have no actual experience with SHB. But based on what I've heard, I wouldn't bother to throw it away unless you see larvae in it or it smells fermented or rotten. (In my view fermented and rotten are two different smells.) Then you might want to do something to kill the larvae. Salt might be useful and not poisonous to the bees so you could reuse the frames later.

    > I treated the surrounding ground with Goldstar.

    Guardstar? That is supposed to kill the larvae and pupa in the ground.

    >I have two supers on it now I think I need to burn those but what of the bottom part of the hive should I burn it also and what of the bees honey?

    I have not heard of anyone burning a hive because of SHB. It's not like AFB. There are not invisible spores hiding in it. If the SHB found your hive once, then more will find it again later. I would not burn anything.

    You can try some of the SHB traps that have been suggested. Dr. Rodriguez has made one that goes on the entrance with FGMO soaked sawdust. Some have closed the main entrance, drilled a hole and put a pipe on the hole. Apparently the SHB have a hard time finding their way in.

    If you are of a chemical mind, they do sell traps with Check-mite in them. I'm afraid the Check-mite is more dangerous than the SHB, myself.

    I wish I had more ideas. A strong hive, of course, also helps.

    Maybe someone with actual experience with SHB can be of more assistance.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Butte Co - North State California
    Posts
    19

    Cool

    Help. Can someone clue me in on what SHB, AFB, and FGMO are? Any other letters I should know about?
    --Ðøug 2004.3.20.15.59.58 PT


    [This message has been edited by Doug Meister (edited March 20, 2004).]

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    Post

    Doug Meister, cool bee

    Small hive beetle
    American Foul brood
    Food Grade mineral oil

    Screen Bottom Boards SBB
    Top bar hives TBH
    anymore?

    Ian

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,588

    Post

    Here's a few more for you:

    EFB = European Foulbrood
    AHB = Africanized Honey Bee
    EHB = Erupeon Honey Bee
    TM = either Terramycin or Tracheal Mite depending on the context.
    T-mites = Tracheal mites
    V-mites = Varroa mites

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