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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    E. TN
    Posts
    116

    Big Grin

    I moved one of my hives the other night. I used the method that someone here had recommended where you place branches overe the entrance to disorientate(sp)the bees.
    As I stated I moved the hive at night with a screen blocking the entrance. I cut a cedar tree and used it across the frt. of the hive and I also placed grass in the entrance like you would when hiving a package. It worked great, the bees are flying and have accepted their new positioning with no problems.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    It does take them a day to get oreinted, but it does work. Sometimes if I see them clustering at the old location that first day, I'll put an empty box there and move it to the new location after dark. But I've never had them confused more than a day.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Maple Plain Minnesota
    Posts
    182

    Post

    I could have used this information last week.
    Ceder tree and grass??

    I bought 2 hives from a friend 1/2 mile away. It rained the next day so the bees didn't fly. Then we got better weather and I lost many of the field bees. I stll have enough bees but more is better. I had planned on spliting them but now probably will not.

    Anyone out there have more sugestions on this matter.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,834

    Post

    I would not recomend and advise other inexperienced beekeepers of that method of moving hives, it isn't that simple...

    Ian

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    I wouldn't move bees 1/2 mile by that method. 100 yards works but that's about the extent. The dense ones circle until they find the new and the branches convince most to orient. 1/2 mile though might not work.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    A woman I used to work with (the one who sparked my interest in beekeeping) gave me a swarm this morning and I brought the swarm home. I was considering putting them closer to the house for now so that I can keep an eye on them, plus my other hives are very strong, and I was a little afraid my strong hives would start entering the new hive for the entrance feeder I have in place. My hive opening is at the opposite end from the feeder and the entrance I have is only about an inch wide for the time being. I'm not quite sure if there would be any benefit of moving them away from the beeyard (it's about 500 feet from where I am considering putting the new hive). Then once the new hive is established, I could try moving them back to the beeyard using your method with the branch in front of the entrance. Any opinions or suggestions?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    I guess I figure moving them is always disruptive whether it's two feet or two miles or 100 yards. If you know you want them in the beeyard, I think I'd put them there to start. If you already put them by the house, I'd leave them until you want to move them. 500 feet is a bit far, but if you put a box at the old location when it's getting toward dark of the first day of the move, and move the bees and that box back in front of the new location of the hive, it will work. I have moved them that far, but there were a lot that I have to take to the hive in the box after dark.


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