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  1. #61
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    May 2002
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    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    What is it that suburbanites put on their lawns that kills grubs and therefore discourages moles? Beautiful, green lawns full of crap, just because Dad doesn't think about it. I'd much rather see a kid stomping down a mole tunnel.

    Dickm

  2. #62
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    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
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    1,998

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    I couldn't agree with you more dickm. It would also be great to see golf played on craggy hillsides, like when the game was created. Besides, there wonderful things that can grow and live in unmanaged yards populated by dandilions and yellow jackets.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    Fist off dickm, sorry or insulting you. That slag was not called for.

    >> I respect your background and was surprised at the size of the outfit you have. I'd like to see it some time. When you talk I usually listen.

    Very proud of what we have here. That kind of snuk out in the conversation here somewhere, doesnt mean anything to the conversation, but practial experience.

    >>I assume rAFB means "resistant AFB"?

    I thought rAFB was univerally excepted as resistant AFB. you not the only one that has asked me that.

    >>2-4-D is Agent Orange.

    Dont know what Agent Orange really is, but herd of it. 2-4-D, that I use is an amine formulated as a solution. Straight from my spray book. Its the same stuff used in most all lawn care dandilion killers. Check your neighbours spray can, and you will probably find 2-4-D listed. (Assuming you dont kill dandilions in your lawn as I dont, for infact we are both beekeepers)

    >>For what it's worth I came off a farm. I think I have a better grasp of these issues than you do simply because I am in the habit of looking at the big picture.

    Well dickm, who comes off the farm and doesnt know what 2-4-D is? Really, it was the oldest herbicide available, and started the shift to agriculture as we now know it. It is the sinlge most important herbicied on the market.
    Becasue of sutch, it tells me that you come off the farm, without any practical farming know how. Im not slaging you here again, just saying simply to come off the farm doesnt give you the veiw of the bigger picture.
    But your right with one point, we are forced to act shortsighted for the matter of survival. But that doesnt mean are opinions are as sutch.


    >>If one weed can survive the application of a harsh chemical and another could not... wouldn't you agree that the last one standing is stronger?

    I read this post a day or so back, without time to respond. And got thinking why you would think resistance to a herbicide makes it a stronger plant. And I got thinking of antibiotic resistant bacterias and sutch known as "super bugs". This name take refers the resistant bacterias as super, or stronger.
    I dont agree with the "stronger" lable of antibiotic or chemicaly reisistant organisms. They are reistant to our terms of controling them, but they dont act any differently in expressing their characteristics. So they arnt stonger, just avoid our controlling them.
    But I do see where you are comming from, after thinking about it for a while [img]smile.gif[/img]

    >>Us sideliners that are working with the alternative potions and resistant bees will be ahead of the curve.

    Dont be nieve. Its not just the sideliners working on the resistant bee. Its the commercial mans lively hood, they are the ones up here that are vesting thier money into this research and development.

    And again the commercial man gets slaged. Well, the commercial beekeepers put the money upfrount here in Canada which allowed the CHC bring Oxalic Acid into use,

    >> I'm OK now. Don't make me mad again. [Embarrassed]


    Its okay dickm, we all need to let off the steam sometimes. Keep your thoughts comming. I enjoy your opinions, just hope you can sort through my spelling!!

    [size="1"][ December 20, 2005, 06:37 PM: Message edited by: Ian ][/size]
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  4. #64
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    Hi Ian,
    When I see your spelling I think that I would be about the same if it weren't for the spell checker. There is a way to get it into the browser, you know. I also suspect you may be bi-lingual and I am not.
    I wasn't lying, just stretching the truth about coming off a farm. It wasn't lately. More like 55 years ago. I do however have a high school degree in agriculture. I used a new yellow herbicide back then to kil some poison ivy. I thought I'd start a sideline but the stuff was too expensive. I now suspect I used 2,4-D in 1950.
    On the other hand, where the heck were you in the Viet Nam war that you never heard of agent orange? I'm not talking to a kid am I? Anyway, 2,4-D was mixed with 2,4,5,=-T and was used to defoliate large tracts of forest in the Nam, to cut down on places for the enemy to hide. It turns out the 2,4,5-T contained "Dioxin" which is one of the worst pollutants on earth. A nerve poison I think. I think some pesticides may create it when they degrade.[not sure but have read something about it.] The run-off from agent orange has plagued a generation of Vietnamese as well as the people that handled it when it was used. Pilots, etc. Guilt by association made me leary of 2,4-D.

    >>>And again the commercial man gets slaged. Well, the commercial beekeepers put the money up frount here in Canada which allowed the CHC bring Oxalic Acid into use.<<

    I knew that. In fact there is a move on to use your material to get it legal down here. Sorry for painting with a broad brush. I have been in contact with a few guys who are fogging pesticides [not FGMO]into their hives and using illegal stuff.

    So I don't have to go look it up: What is your strategy for mites? What bees look good to you? What winter losses do you expect?

    Dickm

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Athens, Ill
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    141

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    > I think my spelling would be the same if I wasnt using spell checker...


    How can I get spellchecker in here.....I hate spewing "stupid" all over the screen, but dont have a dictionary handy.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    B>E>W,
    I forgot how I did it. You need to have a checker on the computer. I have "Word." then you need to get them together. MIKE, MIKE. He knows.

    Dickm

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    I don't know if you mean me. It's obvious I don't have a spell checker. [img]smile.gif[/img] You cna tlel by all teh tpyso.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #68
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    B>E>W,
    Download the Google toolbar. It has a spell checker as well as other good stuff.

    Dickm

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Lee Center, NY
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    150

    Post

    A great free spell checker for anyone who does a lot of internet typing can be found at Free Spell Checker

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    >>I'm not talking to a kid am I?

    What if I told you I was 62. Or mabey 26. Or maybe 55? What does it really matter [img]smile.gif[/img]

    >>So I don't have to go look it up: What is your strategy for mites? What bees look good to you? What winter losses do you expect?


    For V mites, I have used Apistan up till last spring, where I had found higher losses due to suspected resistance. So, I went and cleaned up my hives with Check-mite this fall. Going to start applicating Oxalic Acid next year. I just have to prep myself on this stuff first.

    For t mites I use a soaked cardboard of Menthol. Works very well.

    I have been using mostly Carniolian type bees. They sure beat the Italians up here for winter losses. I have been dabbling into our area selected queens, which are of the darker type. Suspect Carniolian with Russian. Boy, I tell you these bees are something else.
    With the high queen prices, I have been debating on wheather to start more later splits, self queened. And this way improving my stock with area selected queens. This is where the real answer lays for our pest probems. We just have to continue to be paitent, and trust we will over take these problems someday, and bring beekeeping back to where I was 50 years ago.

    Winter losses, well, I like to see 12%. Last year was 30%. But that was mostly due to 20% starvation, thanks to a very abnormal year.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  11. #71
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    May 2002
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    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    Thanks Ian,
    The reason I asked your age was because you were unfamiliar with Agent Orange. The Viet Nam vets are getting older now and a whole younger generation never heard of it.

    You are in Ca. and I'd be happy with 12% down here. Would you give any thought to overwintering a few nucs? Maybe indoors? I like the Carniolans myself. How big would you say a Carni cluster would be right now? I never bother them in winter but am told the size would scare me.

    Dickm

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
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    I'll try not to beat a dead horse, here; I just wanted to pass along a figure on pollination by honey bees that I read the other day that I think makes a lot of sense. I've been reading estimates of pollination rates and trying to discover the methods of the people who make those estimates since the debate about pollination on this thread.

    The figure that I like, and has the best math behind it, in my opinion:

    80% of all "fruit" (no grains or "vegetables" included) consumed by humans in North America is grown in orchards/fields with managed honey bee colonies in the area to provide supplemental pollination.

    I think those numbers are more valuable to beekeepers offering pollination services than general comments about pollination rates across all species of plants, too.

  13. #73
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    Jan 2003
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    Ya those carniolian type bees tend to have a smaller wintering cluster than the Italians, for sure. And it scared me the first few times I wintered them. Now I grin and bear it.

    Fact of the matter, an outdoor wintering colony needs a good mass of bees to beable to maintain a good comfotable winter cluster, and maintain access to lots of food stores. smaller cluster eat less, but also brood less later in winter, leaving a smaller hive coming out of spring.

    Most of my double deep outdoor colonies cluster are the size of a basket ball. Some are even b/w both boxes. Most of my Italians have maintained a cluster larger than that, and fall short for feed late in spring. So I try to avoid the Italians, but boy they are boomers if you can pack enough feed for them, AND there isnt any late winter cold snap surprises!!

    Oviously Carniolian are much more conservative and most suited for our winters here. I love them!!
    And boy, you know, after the first dandilion flow hits, they catch right up to the Italians and I am able to make equil split if not more according to the winter experienced. Makes me wounder why I even bother with Italians>?

    Anyhow, my indoor nucs are a different story. They are managed in one brood chamber, and the wintering cluster is much smaller. Many are like a volley ball, some filling the whole box, but most are a good six inches diameter. Becasue of the limited area to work with, there usually isnt much honey for them to winter on (which is usually a good thing for indoor wintering hives) so I will feed them generally the same amount as I feed my outdoor hives. 2 good pails, or one more. The food displaces the brood as they emerge.

    I know many talk of "over feeding" there hives on this fourm, but my stratagy is to pack as much feed into the hives as I possible can before the fall of winter, to ensure proper nutrition right from Oct. to middle of May. I can access my hives and feed them April, and by May they have lots of access to feed also, but by having a few frames of stored food for them during thier building period, in my own opinion promotes a quicker build. Also adds extra insurance getting the hives to spring due to higher than expected witter feed consumtion to warmer winters. And also allows more time for me to get to my hives during cool wet springs, the years we all dread!!

    Anyhow, enough with my rambling.

    What do you think of the Russians
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  14. #74
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    Hello again Ian. Thanks. I don't have any Russians but plan for some this year. [06]. I've heard the supercedure bees get mean. The rest of it sounds too good to be true. I'm starting to think the Carnies don't handle the mites well. I'm very interested in what Rob Harrison had to say about the Russians. He likes them.

    Dickm

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
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    In my limited experience with Russians, they shut down even faster than Carnis if nectar flows slow down. They seem great at overwintering in small clusters, and they do seem to show great Varroa resistance.

    The commercial keepers in this area have all told me that the Russians don't build up enough for early pollination, but those guys all ship their bees to California and Florida to pollinate almonds and citrus. According to them, they can't get the big build-ups they need for massive honey crops either with the Russians.

    Please don't think I'm trying to dissuade you or anyone else from trying Russians; I'm just passing on my limited observations and the opinions of some big commercial keepers. To some people, the traits I mentioned in the Russians make them an ideal choice.

  16. #76
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    Is Rob using pure line Russians or is he crossing them out?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  17. #77
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    Ian,

    I don't really know. I THINK he recommended the pure russians and from Dann Purvis. He's written about them in the bee mags.

    Dickm

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