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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Yanbu,Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    27

    Question

    Hi;

    exactly two weeks ago I bought two bee packages and I hived them on the same day. I put empty frames and fed sugar as per normal procedure. Also, I hanged the queen cage as advised in all beekeeping books. Two days later, I released the queen and everything was nice and normal. Two days later again I had a check and I found that they are building combs normally. Activities at entrance are also normal.

    Today, I achecked the hive and found something mysterious:

    I found abount ten queen cells, all capped except one (not sure hatched or not yet capped). I also found a queen but also not sure if she is the same one came with the package.

    I wounder what happened. There are two possibilities for the queen I say today:

    - Assuming the original queen died few days after releasing, there are not enough time for her to lay eggs that could be developed to queen cells. This is because foundations were not enough drawn. Also, there is not enough time for the queen cell to hatch, because I saw a queen today.

    - Assuming the queen I saw today is the same one came with the packege, then why there are queen cells?

    Can anyone help me to solve this mystry?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Yanbu,Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    27

    Smile

    The story above is for one of the two hives, the other one is normal.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    I'm not an expert queen rearer by any means, so anyone can feel free to correct my numbers, but I believe from the day an egg is layed to when the workers cap it as a queen cell is 9 days. If you allow a couple of days for the package to build cells big enough for the queen to lay in that would make it not impossible to have some capped queen cells at 2 weeks time. Sometimes the workers just decide to usurp the queen. That's my guess.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    I raise some queens, and it is a matter of numbers. Queens develop in 16 days from an egg. It takes about 2 days for them to mature enogh to mate, and another couple days till they lay. I usually look for eggs 10 days after ther hatch out of thier cells.
    Also, if you had empty foundations, they would need to draw out the comb enough for the queen to lay. Further though to add to the dilema, was it a SMR queen by chance? I had very quick supercedure cells develop this past year, and then the daughter queens turned out fine. Queens can be funny, If they don't smell right to the other bees, I think they assume the queen is starting to fail, and take the correct steps to insure the colony survival.


    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Yanbu,Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    27

    Post

    Hi

    Thanks for the replies , but what does SMR queen mean?

    Saeed

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    "suppression of mite reproduction"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    619

    Post

    Tell us more about SMR Queens and how to tell the difference. Dale

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    SMR are developed by Dr. Harbo in Baton Rouge. They show mite suppression in the way they spin their cocoons. They also have a grooming behavior that is genetic. These genes are also showing signs of being passed on to daughter queens, that are open mated. I purchased two nucs from Drapers last June, and by July The bees already had supercedure cells built. I posted that, and someone else had the same thing happen. I let them supercede and the daughters are fantastic. I have since grafted and raised about a dozen queens, and they seem ok, and they are open mated with the wild bees in the area, which are surviver Italians to my best guess. I plan trying to capture a swarm with the survivors and raise a few queens to see if they show some mite resistance as well. The last swarm I removed,( at least 10 pounds of bees) , I couldn't find the queen to graft from, and no brood as well. That is also a characteristic of SMRs as well. They are supposed to shut down brrod rearing a little earlier. I am hoping the wild bees in this area have adapted in their own way, but will have to see.

    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

    [This message has been edited by Hook (edited October 19, 2002).]

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