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  1. #1

    Angry

    Hello bee keepers

    I do not no if any one got my cry for help. top bars in three of my hives have fallen in.Bees have build comb all across bars. How to I prevent bars fomr falling in? Should I harvest all the comp? What do I do not to damage the brood?

    Experts please help

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I think the lack of response was due to the lack of information you give.

    Do you have a top bar hive, or a langstroth?

    Tell us more about your construction and why you think they fell in.

    At any rate you need to clean up the mess and start over.

    Please post more details.

    Bill

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,423

    Post

    My top bar hive had a lot of combs collapse this year also. I had built it to fit a Lanstroth hive, so I kept pulling out the collapsed ones and puting in frames. Finally I just cut all the brood to fit my medium frames, rubber banded them in and put them all in a hive and scrapped all the honey for feed.

    You might as well try to clean it up. It will only get worse. Smoke the collapsed, crosscombed part heavily to minimize the number of bees and cut the honey out and throw it in a bucket with a lid (to keep the rest of the bees from trying to clean it up) and cut the brood out and rubber band it or tie it into empty frames and put them in a real hive. It will kill a lot of bees and totally disrupt their life, but you have to do something.

    If you still want to maintain the TBH you'll have to decide how you want to do that.

    I think the sloped sided ones are much better because the corners seem to add a lot of stress to the comb. Also the comb is more naturally shaped the way the bees usually make a comb. Also, I think less depth and more width gives it more of a purchase on the top bar. One site I saw they put a slope on the bars and grooves across in places to get the comb attached better to the bar.

    I've considered a number of things including using some wax dipped hardware cloth for the starter strip so it will be firmly attached and spread out the stress.


    Good luck.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,423

    Post

    I suppose Bill is right. We could take what you say several ways. My first instinct was that you have a top bar hive. Maybe you do. Perhaps you have a Lanstroth hive and the box is a little too long or the top bar on the frame is too short and it fell down? We can offer better advice if you clarify.

  5. #5

    Smile

    I would like to thank you all guys who gave me advise on my topbars that are falling in. Iam soryy to forget mentioning that I used KTB Hives
    I have some hope to save my hives and will think of a way to prevent the lateralmovements ofthe bars.


    I am greatly enjoy this forum

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,423

    Post

    So the bar itself has fallen off of the rests. Are they the kind that just rest on the top of the box or is there a notch in the sides for the bars to rest in? If it just rests on the side, you could add a strip of wood on the side to keep them from sliding sideways. If they are in a notch you could add a thin piece of wood to each side or one side (depending on how much you need to fill in and how wide the rest is).

    But of course, the first problem is what to do with the mess. If you don't have any hives with frames to put the comb in, it's a lot harder to figure, but if you can get some frames you can drill holes in a top bar to put the frame sides in and put nails through the sides of the bar to hold these on. Then cut the bottom bar to fit your kenya hive at that depth and nail it in and then then rubber band or tie the comb in. You could even use a thin strip of wood or two horozontally on one side of the frame to help hold the comb in. No matter what you do it will be messy.

    Good luck.

  7. #7

    Smile

    What we do here bin Nigeria is build the top bars to sit inside the hive not on top of the hive itself,this way your bars would sit tightly & would not fall in.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    I think you loose one of the minor advantages in using top bar hives when you seat the topbar inside the hive. If the bar gets glued, then you have to work that much harder to free the topbar. If the topbar seats on top of the hive, then the ungluing is facilitated by leverage and the ability to wrap your hand around it.

    My design is a comprimise. My topbar is cut at the ends so that it is seated in the hive, but still also a portion of the top bar extended outside the hive.

    -----\\\||||||&#012 4;||||||&#0124 ;||||||| |///----- <--- SOmething like that.

    [This message has been edited by Scot Mc Pherson (edited August 20, 2003).]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,423

    Post

    I never had a problem getting a bar loose. You just pry on the bar next to it to lift it. It's easier to cut the grooves in the hive and have a flat bar. Less cuts to make.

  10. #10

    Big Grin

    Well Scott,i belive you know Ann Harman & Bob Cole as leading Master Beekeepers When they came to Nigeria in Febuary & May 2002 the Highly recommended my top bar design.

    Scott Stanly,Nathan Emry,Jeff Nevill & lastly Don Grogan who just left me(2hours ago) for the US are all volunteers from your country who find my work appriciating.


    Beekeeping is all about using your head and getting it right for you & the bees.

    ------------------
    Beekeeping Extension is my concern

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