Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Question

    I did a search on this site, but cannot find the article or posting about how much pest companies charge to remove Africanized bees out west in Arizona / New Mexico.
    I thought about moving out there for the Summer and making some money.
    Anybody know where to find the article of which I am speaking?
    THANKS!
    Jason

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Belding, MI
    Posts
    67

    Post

    I read an article that was saying something like 150.00 an hour per man, for bee removal. I don't remember the link, or I would give it.


  3. #3
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    Jason

    You should be able to charge $100+ per hour in Tennessee. That's about what we get here in the Atlanta Metro area here in Ga.

    BB

  4. #4
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    Billy Bob,
    Are you referring to extractions of honeybees or are you referring to AHB extermination?
    I am charging $50 per hour this year for extractions.
    I would like to charge more since I do it in my hot bee suit and often do the extractions in difficult situations such as removing them above my head working with my arms uplifted while working on colonies in soffits and in basement ceilings.

    I suppose when it comes down to the person saying, "If it's going to cost that much, I'll just spray 'em!" and me charging less than $100 per hour I would consider doing it for less.
    Any thoughts?
    Jason

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    A lot of people aren't willing to pay that much, but then there is the problem of setting a precident. You have to be able to sell the service.

    Customer: "Oh it costs that much? I'll just spray them."

    Beekeeper: "That's not a good idea, if you spray them, you will have several pounds of honey in your walls. This needs to be removed or you will be attracting ants, cockroaches, more bees, wasps, etc etc. Not to mention the damage that will be caused when the combs start to break down and the honey starts dripping down the walls."

    Customer: "Oh, how do I get that out?"

    Beekeeper: "That's why you called me"

    ------------------
    Scot Mc Pherson
    Foundationless Small Cell Top Bar Hives
    BeeWiki: http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/beewiki/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Post

    well said Scott.

    And I would add - the wax inside the wall will continue to attract swarms of bees for years.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    >And I would add - the wax inside the wall will continue to attract swarms of bees for years.

    Decades.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    johnstown N.Y.
    Posts
    131

    Post

    Hi $200 an hour is about what i charge. most are happy to pay it . I gave my name and number to all the local pest control companys. They don't want to touch those jobs so they pass them on to me. I don't give a hourly rate. I give a total fee for the jobs. I only had one client try to bargen the job down Thanks Dan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Heyburn, Idaho, USA
    Posts
    48

    Post

    $200.00 per hour, most people don't really know how long the bees have been there. Their was a house in San Fernando valley in the early 80s, the people called an exterminator who didn't really know what he was doing. I don't know how many seperate colonies were in the house but they were in all the walls and the complete ceiling. Well guess what, with the bees gone the wax melted and the honey was oozing out of the walls and ceiling. The house was a total loss, in California that is big numbers. Somewhere recently I saw in print a mention of a bee house tourist attraction in that area could be the same house. You are absolutly right explain the posible problems, all of a sudden $200.00 an hour is not so bad.
    Have a good week
    Earl White

  10. #10
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest
    I am re-thinking my rates now.
    I know my wife will like the news!
    I suppose there are some circumstances where I will need to decide if $200 per hour is necessary...like if the swarm has just settled into a garage and hadn't had time to settle into a wall or something else that would have to be opened up.
    THANKS FOR ALL THE SUPPORT FOR $200 per hour.
    JG

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    It all depends on your location as to how much you can charge.

    Here I charge $200 for the first three hours of a colony removal, then $50 per hour after that. Swarm pick up is $50, I'll add $5 per foot above ten feet. That keeps me from doing anything I really shouldn't. Like the colony the city called me on last week. It was forty foot up in an overhang on one of those strange designed buildings at a city golf course. I bid $400 and they provide and set up a scizzor lift. He said he would kill them first, I say better them than me.

    I like to give a bid that gives the customer a base line figure. Last week I did a job that took one and one half hours, it paid the same as the one I did tonight that took almost four. Of course if I didn't take the time to cut comb and document with pictures it would not have taken so long. There was hardly any brood, five queen cells and a bazillion bees. There was also a monster swarm just outside on the fence, (extra 50 bucks). I don't know where all the bees came from considering that there were at least two swarms form that colony last week, one I saw in the neighbors yard.

    Another thing I am working into is service calls. With the price of gas over two bucks I am hesitant to drive all over for free. I have been charging from twenty to thirty dollars for certain calls.

    Monday a psychotic rich ***** had me come out only to find two other beekeepers there already, and I was thirty minutes early! I sent them an invoice for thirty. It would have been twenty if it had not been for the lecture about her calls to the Dept of Ag. and the EPA about killing bees. She makes for a good and long story, just not here and now.

    $200 per hour wouldn't work here, but $200 per job does, it is up to you how long it takes.

  12. #12
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    Jason,

    I submited a reply to the forum the other day, but I guess it didn't go through. From what I have read I see that you know where I was comming from. I do like the better them than me reply BULLSEYE BILL had in his post. I feel the same way.

    BB

  13. #13
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    Would most of you agree that the time it takes to extract bees is about 2-3 hours?
    I have considered setting a flat fee and then an additional $50 per hour charge. I guess it just sounds better than saying, "yep, this is gonna cost you $300-500." What kind of insurance would be appropriate for me to get for such jobs? Can I get it on a monthly basis since the jobs usually only run through August?
    Jason

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159
    >Would most of you agree that the time it takes to extract bees is about 2-3 hours?

    Of the three I have done in the last two weeks one took four hours because I tried to salvage brood and took pictures and also hived a swarm on the fence at the same time and the other two were fresh swarms that just moved in and only took one and a half hours apiece.

    But it is not just the time spent on the job that needs to be considered. There is the time to gather the equipment, driving time, job time, and the time to get the bees setteled into the new home, not to mention the equipment that it takes to house them in.

    I figure that there is at least two hours per job that is not spent at the job site.

    So in the three jobs I spent thirteen hours of actual time. I collected six hundred fifty dollars, that is fifty dollars per hour, I can live with that considering that I also keep the bees and on the one job I have two five gallon buckets of honey to render.

    An extraction job goes a lot quicker if you don't try to salvage the brood. Go in and expose the bees, vac em up, chop out the wax, clean out the mess, clean up the area, go home and hive the new "swarm", and feed the debris out in the yard. Cash check, done.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads