View Poll Results: Races of Bees

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  • Italian

    55 57.89%
  • New World Carniolan

    11 11.58%
  • Carniolan

    8 8.42%
  • Caucasian

    4 4.21%
  • Buckfast

    8 8.42%
  • Starline

    7 7.37%
  • Cardovan

    2 2.11%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Results 21 to 33 of 33

Thread: Races of Bees

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,408

    Post

    Curious, until this year I've multiplied both my apiaries by exclusive use of "walkaway splits" and for some reason none of my hives are even "hot". Maybe there aren't so many AHB's or they aren't as common as expected, or maybe they just aren't as totally defensive as advertised.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    Joseph,

    check out this thread

    http://www.beesource.com/cgi-bin/ubb...=000253#000008

    There's a guy, Tomas, from Honduras who talks quite a bit about his experience with AHB.
    He doesn't make it sound like AHB are as deadfull as they're made out to bee

    Dave

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,408

    Post

    It is wonderful to hear of Tomas's first hand experiences with AHB's. And I agree, they don't sound so super-killer to me either.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    AHB is is often painted with a broad brush. Dna tells if AHb as does wing venation but hard to determine if the AHb has the aggressive genes.

    You find the bees with 100% A. scutelata genetics and then your pleasurable beekeeping may be in trouble.

    Would be similar to the last yard I pulled honey supers from this morning. All bees in hives as flow is over and wanting to rob. Robbing makes for some mean bees!
    Bob Harrison

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    I thought I had AHB bees in a package from La. I destroyed the hive and sent some bees to the Tucson lab. They told me that there was a 13% chance they were africanized. Can anyone tell me more about what this means. It was the Fabis test, not DNA.

    Dickm

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    well I clicked Italians but i have mutts also from removals.
    Ted

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,408

    Post

    I thought I had AHB bees in a package from La. I destroyed the hive and sent some bees to the Tucson lab. They told me that there was a 13% chance they were africanized. Can anyone tell me more about what this means. It was the Fabis test, not DNA. dickM
    It basically means that there is an 87% chance they were not AHB.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Aurora, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    49

    Post

    I choose "None of the Above" I purchased Buckfast 2 seasons ago and the hives have swarmed several times so I don't exactly have feral, But I also don't have Buckfast anymore.
    Tom Patterson<br />Aurora, CO

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    Seems like the majority of honeybees are of the Italian race if, this poll is any indication of the make up of honeybees at least in the US. So wouldnÂ’t the majority of feral hives be Italian or crossbreeds of Italian?
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    &gt;They told me that there was a 13% chance they were africanized. Can anyone tell me more about what this means. It was the Fabis test, not DNA.

    It means they were on natural sized or small cell. [img]smile.gif[/img] Other than that it probably means they don't know.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Glasgow, KY
    Posts
    94

    Post

    I have three feral hives that I captured. Is there any way of knowing what they are by looks? Two are pretty mean but one is really calm. Almost solid black with a big fat black queen that seems to really lay a good pattern. Would this queen make a good breeder queen for next years requeening?
    Henry

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    A french guy living in Chester, UK
    Posts
    133

    Post

    I use both Cecropia x Cecropia queens and Buckfast x Cecropia queens.

    All are imported directly from Greece.

    I have been disappointed by the buckfast bee as i find it doesn't give me much honey at the end of the honey flow and i always finish by feeding them a lot.

    Cecropia is a bee which was noticed by Brother Adam (see his last DVD or books) as able to produce a lot of bees, able to save some honey for the winter without the need to feed, and slow to swarm, but use a lot of propolis and may stop laying eggs too early.

    I found them very slow to swarm indeed, and that they produce also a lot of bees but not in excess.

    They have gathered a lot of honey (bearing in mind that i used a lot of their adult bees to make some nucs), and i am actually impressed.

    They are normally gentle and Brother Adam compares them to the carnolian bee if i remember correctly although at them moment are protecting their honey very efficiently, but are certainly not as agressive as the french black bee or the africanised bee...

    I didn't notice any reduction in the size of the brood as where i am in the uk, there is no draught like there could be at this time of the year in Greece.

    I believe these colonies could still be moved to the moors for the heather honey and get an excellent crop.

    This bee is certainly worth a try but may not be for everybody though!

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    I don't think Cecropia are available here in the US.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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