Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 47
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    >When would you replace Queen's then, in the spring or fall?

    I agree with Bjorn. But it is a lot of work in the summer to pull all those super to get to the brood chamber to find and eliminate the old one and introduce the new queen. But it is a good time to buy them. The advantage to fall is that you may already have the supers off. The advantage to spring is that the supers aren't on yet. Any of these will work depending on what you want to spend, how much work you want to do and how much risk you want to take.

    I try to do most requeening in the summer or fall because of price and it's a good time to do it. Sometimes I have some failing in the spring so I do it then.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,506

    Post

    I favor spring, early summer requeening. There are alot of bees in the hives after the honeyflow to find that old queen. I don't have the time...
    I'm thinking of requeening more of my hives next year through the honey flow with cells. During the honey flow they say the new queen is easier accepted by the colony. And if the new queen is no good, the old queen will remain in control. Any thoughts on this?

    Ian

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Ian

    The canadians are the ones that started the summer requeening trend with cells and have done the research on it. It is fast and simple....cant have any excluders on though. Success is suppose to be slightly better than the method that is frequently used in the western states of running virgins into the hives.

    Either case only gives something in the neighborhood of 20-50% success on average from what I have read and seen myself. Works best on a decent flow and disturb as little as possible. The success rate sounds low at first low but you can do it 5 times over for 5% of the effort it takes to find and kill queens.


  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    I haven't tried cells or virgins, but I hear, second hand, that Dee and Ed Lusby just smoke them heavy and let the virgin in between the brood bodies and let nature take her course. Seems like the most labor saving method. Often, they say, they end up with a two queen hive for a while.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Daisy, could you please post your recipe and application schedule for using thyme oil? (Sorry if you've already done so.)
    Thanks,
    Margot

    Margot, I'm at the end of the third week doing this and so I'll give you the recipe, instuctions, and my observations so far.

    And you can decide on any variables. If you change anything about this, I would like to know how it worked for you... OK?

    I have five hives, but combined a few days ago and have four overwitering, I hope.

    I can treat all my fives with two jars of spiked vapo rub per month. That's if I'm not over doing it. Maybe one application per month is enough, I don't know. But I changed out the "dressing" after two weeks. Again, maybe it's not neccessary, maybe after three weeks would work??? This is why I'd like anyone's else's experience on the matter.

    I get my vapo rub at the dollar store for a dollar. I take out about two TBLspoons of the product to make room for my essential oils.

    I had on hand white flannel and cut them into pieces approx. 2 by 4 inches. These are ready for when the oils are prepared and ready for the cloth to be saturated in the heated oils mixture.

    I place the vaporub jar with lid off, in the microwave for about 20 seconds. I have my oils on the counter with my measuring spoons etc. ready to use after I take the melted vaporub out of the microwave.

    As soon as I take the vaporub out of the microwave.....

    I add a Tbls of thyme essential oil, and a Half teaspoon of Camphor Spirits (84% alcohol from Walmart) and one teaspoon of eucalyptus globules (oil). The vaporub has the menthol.

    And Mix.

    While it's still warm, I dip the pieces of cloth in the jar and saturate. I give it a twist to get off excess oils, and bag. For my hives, I bag four. I put the lid on the jar and put this up till I need it again.

    I place on per hive in the brood nest area, off to the side. Mine are on the lowest brood box.

    My observations so far.

    During a sticky board mite test, some mites were dead and some mites were crawling on the sticky board. I use a very thin layer of sticky on the board, to see how many are dead and how many are alive during my test.

    When I use this "stuff" in the hives, I got more mites dropping on the sticky board but they were All dead. I don't have sbb, just solid boards. What I observed is the bees kicking out the dead mites. In other words, dead mites are not located back inside on the hive floor. They fan the mites to the entrance where they'll either hit the ground or get stuck up against the inside of an entrance reducer. The bees can't pick up the mites off the floor from what I've observed, so they fan the mites with their wings to blow the mites to front and out. Or the dead mites accumulate at the entrance reducer when one is in place.

    Don't add more then a half teaspoon of camphor spirits, or you may choose not to use it at all. If you don't use the camphor spirits, I'd like to know the results you get.

    You may decide to change out the clothes once a month, but check in a couple of weeks to see how much it's been propolized. If it's covered over alot, I'd change it out for sure. When they propolize it heavily, it's rendered useless. I don't know of anything to encase it in, but if you come up with an idea how it can be encased and still be effective, please let me know.


  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    I forgot to add,

    I'm going to do this till the end of oct. That's four applications.

    At this time, I don't know if I'll keep one in there for the winter or not. I haven't decided yet.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    I believe it's possible to eliminate chemicals completely. I'm going on four years without any treatments at all, and haven't lost a hive to mites. I'm using Russian bees with screened bottom boards. I checked the 24 hour mite drop a few days ago and they averaged 2 mites (none more than 10). I think the russian bees are more aggressive, which is good when it comes to mite control. Like the Europeans, I replace brood comb every 3 years to prevent foulbrood.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    I bought Vicks (on Daisy’s advice) for stopping robbing. I bought the Walgreen’s equivalent but I compared the ingredients. There was also, next to it, a Walgreen equivalent of Mentholatum. Mentholatum does not have Eucalyptus oil. Vicks does. Daisy, does your "dollar store" variety have Eucalyptus oil? Did you think it needed more? Also, did you notice that Vicks has Thymol in it also. Perhaps not in the amounts you added.


    [This message has been edited by Michael Bush (edited September 22, 2003).]

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Lyme, NH, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    Thanks, Daisy. I'll try this and let you know my results.
    I am concerned about how much of any essential oil to use. Is it best to use oils the cloths,in grease patties, to put oils in the feeder, or to cpombine two or more of these. (I already use FGMO strips.)

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Daisy, does your "dollar store" variety have Eucalyptus oil? Did you think it needed more? Also, did you notice that Vicks has Thymol in it also. Perhaps not in the amounts you added.

    Micheal, Yes, the dollar store variety called "chest rub" has eucalyptus at 1.2 percent, menthol 2.6 percent and camphor 4.8 percent.

    These are rather small percentages to my mind. So I add additional eucalyptus and camphor. And the thyme of course.

    You say vicks has thymol? I didn't know this. I rather doubt vicks has thymol. The dollar store chest rub seemed better then Vic's brand to me. Has more oils if I remember correctly.....


    I am concerned about how much of any essential oil to use. Is it best to use oils the cloths,in grease patties, to put oils in the feeder, or to cpombine two or more of these. (I already use FGMO strips.)

    I use oil patties made of sugar and olive oil. But maybe with the use of this "stuff" I described, it's possible that I may not need the Grease Patties at all. I will experiment on one hive next year omitting the grease/oil (for tracheal m.)patties to see if what I suspect could be true. This will hopefully get more oils/grease out of the bees mouths.

    And fed herbals in the honey B healty homemade recipe in the spring and in the fall.

    I occasionally sprayed the brood of all my hives in July and early Aug. after I got some honey off my established hive. (only one this year). Spraying the brood has led some to believe it could bring on supercedure cells. Never spray the queen, but I have by accident and she was ok......

    Maybe if brood spraying was done later in the summer, this could be a good thing? For those who want a young queen going into fall. Thinking out loud.

    So to establish a course of action, I'd say, ideally, more then one intervention should be used.

    And the less oils the bees consume the better, but what that amount is, well, I'm still experimenting.....



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    The Thymol in Vicks is listed in the "inactive" ingredients. Along with cedar leaf oil and kerosene. Why? I have no idea. Perhaps Thymol does not have any "decongestant" properties and that's what the medicine is supposed to be for. All of the "incative" ingredients other than petrolatum seem pretty active to me.


  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Well heck fire.........

    Here's the list of inactive ingredients for dollar store chest rub....

    cedarleaf oil, nutmeg oil, special petroleum, spirits of terpentine, thymol.

    Thymol is the last ingrediant listed so probably the least precentage.

    So there you have it.

    Something I forgot to mention and is a very important variable.

    The cut fabric size is placed into two deeps and a super of interior space. So for example, I wouldn't put this large of piece into a nucc. I don't know if this is something someone would do or not , but I felt it was worth mentioning. I wouldn't put a piece as large as 2 by 4 inches into a smaller space. If you're experimenting, best to start with less then more.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    You're right, it's turpentine, not kerosene. But I consider turpentine pretty active.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turpentine
    Definition from there...

    Turpentine
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

    Turpentine is a semifluid resin obtained from trees, mainly pines of the genus Pinus. A volatile oil called spirit of turpentine, oil of turpentine or, colloquially, turps can be extracted by distillation. Turpentine has been described simply as "distilled trees". Turpentine is used as a solvent, especially for thinning oil-based paints, and as a raw material for the chemical industry. Turpentine was also used in folk medicine for the treatment of intestenial worms or mixed with animal fat as a primitve chest rub for nasal and throat complaints. Some modern chest rubs still contain turpentine. (Vick's Vaporub)
    Turpentine is sometimes called acquaragia; cf aqua regia.


    Michaal, it's sometimes called camphor weed. This is why I'm concerned about how much if any extra camphor should be used if at all?

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    camphor is in moth balls so if it's possible to keep the half teaspoon without this hurting bees, my theory is, it will keep down/out the wax moths.

    I guess I should have mentioned this earlier, but it's hard to cram hours or research into one post because I forget.

    Haven't had moths in the hives during this test period.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    fall city Wa USA
    Posts
    112

    Post

    any thoughts on this. A product called KAZ Inhalent comes in liquid form. its ingred. List in order.

    Oil Of EucalyptusNF,Oil of Peppermint USP,Menthol USP, CamphorUSP, Methyl Salicytate USP ( 4/10th%) Oil of Lavender USP, Anmatto Vegetable color,Light mineral oil.


    I have also read that the hive temp has to be above 70 degrees for any of this to work as the vapors have to suspend in the air. So Sept is the best month to do this.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Whitney, these are pretty much the same ingredients we've been talking about.

    And I started the treatment with my stuff on Sept. 1

    The bees will keep the temperature up above ninty degrees inside, with this "stuff" in there, it will remain affective.

    I don't know what the temp is inside during winter but I'm thinking if this were kept inside in winter it could be affective then as well.

    Even if only on days when the outside temps are up.

    If I kept on inside throughout the winter, it's possible that I may only have to feed the Honeybhealthy in the spring. Maybe add some fresh stuff at that time too.


  18. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    All the ingredients in the KAZ are used by someone for bees. Methyl Salicylate is the active ingredient in Wintergreen oil.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Smile

    Can we start a new General Forum called "Daisies Recipes?" Then it would be easier to print them out!
    Denise

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Montezuma, GA USA
    Posts
    69

    Post

    I don't know if this helps but since definitions of what turpentine is was thrown out I thought it might help to know what turpentine really is. It is a nonhomogeneous conglomeration of terpenes, that have some degree of polymerization of isoprene (5 carbons). Most all terpenes follow a head to tail formation, camphor being only one of thousands. My vocation is a chemical engineer in the paper industry and one of our byproducts is turpentine, we sell it and it is made into artificial flavoring, make-up, steroids, and a host of other products. My point is that if you are trying to treat for some problem in your hives and you use turpentine as an ingredient, your results may vary each time you use a different container of turpentine because its constituants may well be different each time. If you are able to buy just the compound you want(ie. camphor), once you find a workable treatment you will not have to worry about it changing with out your knowledge. I would recommend trying Fisher Scientific, you may pay a little more but you know what you're getting.

    Mark

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads