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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Chicago
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    83

    Post

    Mike,

    Would you be so good as to tell me anything you feel I should know about the EpiPen.

    I just purchased 3 of them.
    Do not assume malice for what stupidity can explain.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    83

    Post

    "Replace any Auto-Injector if the solution is discolored or contains a precipitate.
    The EpiPen Auto-Injector is designed with a see-through window to allow periodic
    examination of its contents. The physician may recommend emergency use of an
    Auto-Injector with discolored contents rather than to postpone treatment."

    What color should the epinephrine be?
    Do not assume malice for what stupidity can explain.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973
    I'm not MIKE, but carry an epi with me. The best bet if in doubt about the use of an EPI is to contact your doctor, as misuse use can result in serious consequences. they are a prescription and need to be replaced yearly, the liquid should be clear.
    I'm no doctor. The use of the epi is if and, only if symptoms of anaphlixic (sp) shock appear IE, constriction of the airway, extream diffaculty breathing, inability to swallow, DO NOT use if their is just swelling and minor irritation.
    Why did you get 3?? At $85.00 a pop, that was kinda spendy.

    [size="1"][ March 30, 2006, 01:26 PM: Message edited by: SilverFox ][/size]
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    83

    Post

    An overkill of safety. I was thinking of keeping one at the house, one by the hive (but cool), and train a neighbor and give them one.
    Do not assume malice for what stupidity can explain.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    83

    Post

    Plus my insurance picked this up. $65.00 for 3.
    Do not assume malice for what stupidity can explain.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    Good idea, I have to remember to grab mine as I go out the door, allot of times I find Demerol is all I need. But the EPI is there just in case.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    South Kingstown, RI
    Posts
    134

    Post

    FYI There is an EPIPEN Jr for use on children that is a lower dose. I have the adult and a Jr in case one of my kids needs it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,027

    Post

    It should be clear, not brown or cloudy. Sunlight degrades it quickly. wrapped in an opaque wrapper (tinfoil for my scored vials of adrenaline) in the fridge is best.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    Mine says not to refrigerate. But to store at 50-60 degrees.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    942

    Post

    It all sounds nice but be wary. Epipens are prescription medicine. I'm not sure I have neighbors that trustworthy.

    I heard a brief from a volunteer fireman and beekeeper who recommends that no one administer an epipen to someone else (except of course situations like a parent to a child).

    The reason is that without proper training you could do much more harm than good. For instance, if someone is unconscious by their hives, how would you know if they had an allergic reaction to a sting or are suffering from heat stroke. Administering an epipen to someone with heat stroke may well do them in. He also indicated that "Good Samaritan" laws may be null and void if you start giving out prescription meds.

    Just food for thought.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Are you folks severly allergic??? Or is this simply insurance??

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,787

    Post

    I wrote a rather lengthy reply which apparently got lost somewhere. So I'll try again.

    First, I don't know which of the many Mikes on here you're refering to, but since I'm one of them, I'll respond.

    I have never had an Epipen and have no plans to ever get one. I have no experience with them and, in fact , have never actually seen one.

    I do know, from Anatomy and Physiology class what Epinephrine does to the body, and I know from the many medical people I hang out with what anaphylaxis is like. If I had a pen and I was having serious trouble breathing, I would use one.

    I have no idea what color it should be.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Parkton, North Carolina
    Posts
    253

    Post

    How do you get a doctor to prescribe one if you have no history of severe allergy? In this day and age of managed health care I am amazed that a doctor would agree or that an insurance company would pay for it without documentation of a true need. That being said, I would love to have one just for a precaution. I tried to get my military pediatrician to write a script for my son and he said it wasn't needed since he had no history or reactions. I'm going to try again with my doctor next week but I don't hold out much hope. I tried to find one online but it seems that most of them require a script. Theresa.

    [size="1"][ March 30, 2006, 07:10 PM: Message edited by: gardenbees ][/size]

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Primatine mist is an over the counter inhaler that has epinephrine in it. It also has a much longer shelf life.

    With several inhalations and a belt of liquid benadryl you'll get to the ER. Call the ER and let em' know you're coming. Arguably safer than injectables.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    Thanks for that tip Sundance!
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Parkton, North Carolina
    Posts
    253

    Post

    Yes, couldn't hurt to have one around. Wonder how much epi is in though? Have you heard of it's use during anaphalaxis? Theresa.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    If you are certain you are deathly allergic to bees then the epipen is the only way to go, no arguement.

    But if you "just want to be safe" then primatine mist and liquid benadryl are good insurance.

    And the most important thing is to gently scrape off the stinger and sac quickly without further injection.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Camp County, Tx
    Posts
    94

    Post

    I dont know if this is true, but heard that it's usually not your first sting that you have a bad reaction with, but could occur at a sting later on. If this is so, then why would someone ask if there is a "history" of a reaction to bee stings, prior to issuing a prescrip? I have a couple epi's stored in the house in case I need it. But since I have received some stings, if I can go on history, then I may not buy more of them.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wausau Wi
    Posts
    311

    Post

    the liquid should be CLEAR. And yes talk to your doctor.
    Everything happens for a reason. Time heals all wounds - time and a half heals them even faster

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    The reason my doctor prescribed mine was as a preventive, when I first started bee keeping my throat started to constrict, I informed my wife and we both monitored my self through the next 24 hrs. Thankfully it disappeared, when I informed my DR. he thought it might be prudent to have an EPI available. I have heard that some people build up an immunity to bee venom and some a toxicity-you can get stung a million times and nothing, the next one gets you-I haven't had the constriction since, but you never know.
    gardenbees; EPI-PENS are used for the treatment of anaphalaxis(sp)shock.
    Mine are prescribed by the VA.
    Now I use benadryl and watch myself for indications of a severe allergic reaction.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

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