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Thread: Showy Tamarix

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Twig, Minnesota USA
    Posts
    66

    Big Grin

    I am wondering if anyone has experience with the Showy Tamarix. I know in some area this plant is wide spread and is considered an invasive plant. I have seen it up here in the northern part of minnesota and it seems to behave it's self... the plant has a very nice fragrance. I am wondering if anyone has it in their area and how well the bee work it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    I wonder if this is the same as the bamboo that I have planted. Do you have a picture?
    I just got something from the MN dept of ag saying it is highly invasive and they discourage planting of it.
    What I have blooms really late in the fall, and all the bees (and wasps and hornets)love it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Twig, Minnesota USA
    Posts
    66

    Big Grin

    I don't have a picture, but here is a link to it; https://www.jungseed.com/(np1lqpmoqdrh14554wyt4he3)/jungsite/jungsiteviewproduct.aspx?ProductID=21828 I don't think that your bamboo and the showy tamarix are the same plant. Your bambo if planted into a container, you can control the spreading of it. What kind of bambo did you get?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

    Post

    The tamarisk is the tree we call salt cedar, a small, shrubby tree with soft wood and small, round needle-like leaves. They commonly take over river bottoms and are presently colonizing the Arkansas bottom south of us here.

    Salt cedar looks nothing like bamboo. River cane and Bamboo look somewhat alike, but few of the useful bamboo varieties can take really cold weather.

    Anyone know what salt cedar honey looks and tastes like?
    Ox

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    The bamboo I have appears to be something called Japanese knotweed, aka Japanese Bamboo, Mexican bamboo, giant fleece-flower, or Hancock's curse. Two different latin names, Polygonum cuspidatum or Fallopia Japonica, with the second one thought to be correct.
    Not a true bamboo, but a semi-woody perennial broadleaf in the buckwheat family. Fast growing and aggressive, and can send rhizomes out as far as 50 feet.
    Grows from six to nine feet tall.
    Produces clusters of white flowers in late August and September. (My bees really love it.)
    Alas, my favorite plant is on the Dept. of Ag's least wanted list, and looks like it has the potential to be really a pain. I got it from a friend in the Moose Lake area, and it grows really well.

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