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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
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    169

    Cool

    I saw in one of the catalogs that they sell pancake syrup made with honey and fruit - mostly berries of some sort.

    Any idea how it is done? Would I just sub honey for what a regular receipe calls for a sugar syrup base?

    Martha

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    311

    Post

    I market a Honey maple pancake syrup, its just a ratio of the two. I saw a website last year of a british honey company that was selling fruit packed in honey. i tried to emulate it, but I had problems with the stuff fermenting during testing. Made a great wine starter though. Perhaps they dehydrated it first?
    Anyway, to respond, Yes, I'd try substituting
    honey for the called for sweetner. Make a small batch and adjust to your likeing.

    J.R.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Wayne, NJ USA
    Posts
    381

    Post

    Sounds interesting. Does honey maple syrup need refrigeration? Do you produce it in a hot or cold process?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Milford, MI
    Posts
    328

    Post

    Sungold, the honey can not be processed with heat, without damaging the taste of the honey and killing the enzymes. That doesn't mean the rest of the recipe can't be heated, just wait until it has cooled to room temperature to add the honey and mix.

    Phoenix

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Wayne, NJ USA
    Posts
    381

    Post

    My apologies for being so dense but I still don't understand. If your are adding minimally processed honey (a potential carrier of micro spores) to cooled maple syrup, do you then need to keep the finished honey/maple syrup refirgerated? Just seems to me that the blended product would need refrigeration, no? Then, I'm thinking refrigeration & honey don't mix? I like the concept, I just don't understand how you would produce (w/out high heat processing the honey/maple blend) this without potential micro issues?

    [This message has been edited by Sungold (edited July 27, 2004).]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Frystown, Pa, United states
    Posts
    37

    Post

    I don't refrigerate honey or maple syrup seperately so I wouldn't think it necesary to refrigerate a combination of the two.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Wayne, NJ USA
    Posts
    381

    Post

    Ok I guess that's it. I didn't realize that maple syrup does not require refrigeration after opening. What do I know, I just live here. Thanks.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Clifton Park, NY, USA
    Posts
    133

    Post

    now are we talking about the stuff they call maple syrup in the stores or real maple syrup from maple trees ? Real maple syrup will go bad if not kept cold. In fact it goes bad in the fridge too if kept too long. I freeze my syrup for long storage.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Wayne, NJ USA
    Posts
    381

    Post

    I assumed we were talking about the real stuff.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Hookstown PA USA
    Posts
    581

    Post

    J. Russel: I think that if you pasteurized the fruit before mixing i with the honey that it wouldn't ferment. Proper;y cured honey has such a high osmotic pressure that bacteria can't get a foothold. Perhaps by adding the fruit and increasing the water content you allowed natural yeasts to get going. It's really the only thing that makes sense. Mead made with fruit is reall good, and I'll take that over syrup any day.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
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    311

    Post

    Sungold ; Martha.....


    This is how I do it.

    Maple syrup......REAL maple syrup, not that chemicaly flavored glucose you find in the grocery store, needs to be refridgerated after you open it. When they bottle maple syrup, they do it at a sterile temperature, just like canning. I use honey with a moisture content of about 15%, I blend in a ratio of maple syrup, but i use a very dark grade. I heat it. ( Yes, I know I'm wrecking the enzymes and the natural flavors of the honey....but the desired flavor is Maple, not honey, and the maple flavor of the syrup smothers any of the more delicate nuances of the honeys flavor to the palate.) Then I bottle it.

    The ratio of maple syrup to honey is up to you depending on your taste. I wont give out my recipie, sorry.

    I strongly suggest using a dark grade of maple syrup as it has more flavor and a little goes a long way.
    It also makes sense to use your darker honeys in this as lightness of color will be overtaken with the maple.

    Real maple syrup, and this honey maple blend needs refridgeration after opening. Thats very important as even with starting with 15% moisture content honey, the maple syrup brings the % over 19. Fermantation may occure at room temp. over time, and I put a best before date of 9 months on my jars.

    Hope this helps.

    John Russell



    [This message has been edited by John Russell (edited July 30, 2004).]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    783

    Wink

    I take 3 hot pancakes; cover with 1/3 cup fresh strawberries and 1/3 cup fresh blueberries; a generous sqeeze of the honey jar, and then top with a bit of whipped cream. I call it my Red, White and Blue breakfast and always have it on July 4th.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,600

    Post

    My wife, who is not a sweet eater, who never, ever puts maple syrup on pancakes, waffles or french toast becasue it is too sweet, is so thrilled with this years honeycrop that she is putting it on everything. I am a maple man when it comes to the aforementioned breakfast items. . . but she just might be onto something!

    Keith

    PS: Maple? I prefer grade B, refridgerated for shelf life (not that it lasts long) and gently warmed before use.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    You may want to try using something called maple sugar instead of syrup. It is syrup that has had enough of the water driven off that it crystalizes. I don't know the moisture content, but I would suspect that it is in the same ball park as honey. At any rate it is very "maple -y". You could probably use a fair amount of honey along with a smaller amount of maple sugar and get the results that you want.
    You would have to do some testing to find if it needs refridgeration.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    311

    Post

    Hmmmmmmmmm........
    The crystals may sink to the bottom, or may start crystalzing the honey.
    However, your idea may make an excellent creamed maple honey.........

    I'll try that out, and tell you how it works out...

    John Russell

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Wayne, NJ USA
    Posts
    381

    Post

    "Real maple syrup, and this honey maple blend needs refridgeration after opening."

    John,

    Doesn't refirgeration cause the honey to crystalize?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    western new york state USA
    Posts
    20

    Post

    Hello everyone,
    I have been producing maople syrup commercially for 30+ years now and will guarantee that maple syrup has to be refrigerated after opening or it will definitly mold once it is opened or transfered from its original hermetically sealed container.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    From my expeience real Maple syrup (the only kind I buy for myself) molds once it is opened, whether you put it in the refrigerator or not. Since I much prefer hot pancakes to ice cold ones, mine stays in the cupboard. When it does mold I skim it off and keep using it.

    I would guess if you mixed it with honey, the honey would have enough anti microbial properties to keep the mold out, but I haven't ever tried it. When I want them mixed, which I sometimes do, I just put some of each on the pancakes.

    Why not make a small batch of it mixed and set it on the shelf and see if it molds?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    311

    Post

    Sungold, Mike B :

    Maple syrup is fine moldy, if you skim it off.......( like cheese is.)

    Blending honey in with maple syrup does tend to make it anti fungal, so mold isn't an imediate issue. Yes, refridgerating honey causes crystalization, but the honey I use for flavored honeys, I'll heat so the jars vaccum seal. I dont boil it mind you, just heat it to a certain temp. This helps retard crystalization, and yes I know heating honey
    is taboo.....but the natural subtle flavors are overwhelmed by the Maple anyway.

    If crystalization still happens, I place the whole jar in a warm water bath and re-lable.

    ( Wich is why glass packaging Rocks!)

    J.R.


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