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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Clarksville, TN USA EEUU
    Posts
    131

    Post

    James and Jon,
    These are likely explanations and I want to thank you for your suggestions.
    However, I question these explanations.
    1. The bee had an abnormally small abdomen. It was about half the length of the others' abdomens.
    2. It's color and appearance were the same as the other bees in my OH.
    3. If she were a robber bee, how would she have gained entrance being weaker due in part to her physical abnormaility and secondly, would a bee with this abnormality/weakness be sent out to rob as a field bee?
    4. This was not the only incidence of finding a bee with this short abdomen. I found a second a day or two later on the ground outside the entrance.
    5. Could it simply be that she was ousted due to the abnormality/inability to perform duties?

    My hive is the one from Dadant with one deep and one shallow. They have been in there for almost two months and still have not extruded out the shallow. The swarm was small enough to fit into a quart jar, but have rapidly grown. There are probably about twice that number now. They have begun extruding a small portion of the foundation in the shallow on one side only right above the area where they have connected the two frames with burr comb and nectar. I suppose that the nectar flow has slowed and hence a slow in wax building?
    Jason G

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Little Rock
    Posts
    48

    Post

    I don't know. Maybe the majority entered purposefully (determined) because they were being scented to. Or maybe the new bees enter at an overwhelming level and so the other bees do nothing because they feel as though they can be viewed as foreign. I have seen what you describe, also, when combining hives. Unfortunately, last year, after way too much work obtaining them I added a rather large swarm with a dead queen to an existing strong queenright hive on 10 deep frames. I added another 10 drawn deep frames on the bottom to make room. Everything seemed fine with just a little fighting. The bees marched right on in. The next afternoon a mass of several thousand bees lay on the ground outside the hive. Not sure why this time it was different for them. The only thing different than usual was that the weather turned bad while I was combining them. You'd think they would take a lesson from us and just try and get along. Most of the time I don't lose any, or at least not many, when combining hives. But I also use newspaper between them just to be safe.
    James

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    I could be wrong, but isn't Tenn. the sight of the now infamous Scopes Monkey Trial. Appearently educational sysetens haven't changed much since the time of William Jennings Bryant.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Clarksville, TN USA EEUU
    Posts
    131

    Post

    Aspera,
    You are correct. Tennessee is the state in which this "trial" ocurred. Educational sysetens?
    I am not familiar with this terminology.

    Sadly, people automatically equivocate an anti-evolution stance with religion. What is also unfortunate is that people are so brain-washed today to not be able to see that evolution itself is a religion as the "theory" aka hypothesis was not and is not proven by Scientific Method nor does it have any more right to be taught in public schools than does basket-making which may actually be much more beneficial.

    Usually people who have been brain-washed by "evolutionist thought" resort to put downs, jabs and lying when confronted with such ideas and truths that contradict their belief system.

    Jason

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    As you stated yourself, science is not a belief system but rather a methodology for validating groups of observations. And no belief system that I know of inherently contradicts our cuurent understanding of evolutionary mechanisms. The earliest proponents of evolution were, without exception deeply religous Christians (Darwin himself was a man of the cloth)

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Clarksville, TN USA EEUU
    Posts
    131

    Post

    I was not aware that Charles Darwin had ever become a priest or monk, but I seem to remember that perhaps he entertained the idea earlier in life.

    A wise Creator obviously would include an ability to adapt and change, but did not do so on the scale to which evolution would suggest.

    Jason

  7. #47
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    88

    Post

    Throwing down the gaunlet here. I plan to take courses in microbiology and genetics. I would like to speak more precisely on these and other matters. At this time in my life I am a part time beekeeper, and a full time computer engineer.
    What are we, men or Beekeepers?

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    Hi Paul,

    After 30 years I just retook Micro last year. It's changed a lot and I highly recommend it. You'll get a lot of genetics in that class and then maybe you'll be better prepared for a genetics class. I don't recommend both at the same time unless you have a lot of free time now. It's hard to choose between your scout meeting and turning in your month long project in class on time.

    Good luck,

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

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