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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    4

    Question

    I have a little bee visiting my yard this year. He looks like a hummingbird (about 1/3 to 1/2 inch in size, a long little straw like a hummingbird beak to probe flowers and he flys similar to a hummingbird too, in that he "hovers" and can manuver backwards. He is not aggresive and is of the bumblebee specie, I believe. Does anybody know what type of bee he is or where I can inquire as to same?
    I would also like to encourage more of these
    little fellows and cater to their needs.

    Many thanks! * Katie Eileen, Seattle

    [This message has been edited by Katie Eileen (edited May 01, 2001).]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    sacto,ca,USA
    Posts
    3

    Smile

    I beleive you saw a calliope hummingbird as they live in your area and are among the smallest of the hummers.There is a hummer called the, Bumblebee hummingbird but it lives in mexico and occasionally visits Arizona and southern California.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    4

    Question

    I appreciate your kind response, but no it is not the Calliope Hummingbird (which is much larger compared to this fellow.) Nor, is it a Hummingbird Moth. It is definately a little bee.

    This little bee looks like a honey brown pussywillow. It is about 1/3 inch long with a long tube of at least 1/8 to 1/4 inch, which it uses to syphon the nector from flowers. Right now it is atracted to the forget-me-nots. His wings are smaller in proportion to his body and set well to the back and are clear on top, black on the lower half of the wings. There is no tail,
    and, no visible head, that I recall. He is the equivalent to the larger of the marion bee specie, but more like a blymph, if you catch my drift. He flys, again hovering similar to a hummingbird, and can fly backwards. He is not a "fly"--he is a BEE.

    Thanks again. Has anyone else ever seen one of these? I believe he is an afternoon to early evening gatherer.

    ------------------
    Katie Eileen
    Seattle

    [This message has been edited by Katie Eileen (edited May 01, 2001).]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Bluff City, TN USA
    Posts
    80

    Post

    Good morning Katie, I don't know their name, but we have them here in east Tennessee. Jim

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    20

    Post

    I'm also in TN and think I know what you're talking about. Small, dumpy, somewhat golden brown, long pointy sipper... I had always thought they were a kind of fly. Unfortunately I don't have a bug guide in the house to find the name of what I'm thinking of.

    Don

  6. #6
    Pollinator Guest

    Post


    Take a look at the middle picture. You may be seeing a bombylid fly. Unfortunately the picture is a little fuzzy. I'm going to try to get a better picture this year.



  7. #7
    CHARLIE JOHNSON Guest

    Post

    Katie this is probaly a little in response to your question but that hummingbird you saw is a moth I have one or two come to my house in late spring to early summer Charlie Buckley Wash.

  8. #8
    Pollinator Guest

    Post

    I finally got a better picture of a bombylid fly. Is this your "bee?" http://pollinator.com/gallery/bombylid.htm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    4

    Post

    Well, it certainly looks like him, yes, from what I remember. I am 98% certain that is him. BUT, how dissappointing to find out he is classified as a fly. There is no know social instincts to this little fellow? Can
    you tell me a brief synopsis of what you know about their character?

    Thank you so much!--keg

    ------------------
    Katie Eileen
    Seattle

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    4

    Post

    I signed off too soon. Charlie, I think those are ladybird moths, which you are referring to. We still have them in the pacific n.w., but not as plentiful. They have been spraying too heavily for catapillars here. Thanks to all who answered and tried to help and didn't give up--Charlie and Pollinator most recent!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Mons ,Belgium
    Posts
    5

    Post

    We have them also in Europe but it is rather common here it is the only flying thing here that looks like a humming bird here. we do not have humming birds here...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Mons ,Belgium
    Posts
    5

    Post

    We have them also in Europe but it is rather common here it is the only flying thing here that looks like a humming bird here. we do not have humming birds here...

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