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Thread: wax worms

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Maple Plain MN
    Posts
    37

    Angry

    I just found this site. I will have to read back emails soon as I get time. I am back to beekeeping after 40+years. 2 colonies Just as a hobby and to polinate pumpkins.
    Now for the important question that I was looking to answer. I have "come by" much bee equipment. Much of the wax has been striped from plastic foundation. Can I use the foundation as it is? Will the bees draw it out to worker comb? Do I need to somehow "wax" it?

    ------------------
    E N Minnesota

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Welcome back,

    Do you happen to know if the foundation is duraguilt foundation? Which is a plain unembossed plastic which is coated with embossed wax and has metal on the sides for strength? If this is indeed the foundation you are talking about the bees will not draw it where the wax has come off. If just a little wax has come off you can add a little wax on it. But if allot is gone you might be better off with new wax foundation, or plastic if that is your thing.

    Clay

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    What do you mean by plastic foundation. If it is old duragilt, (clear plastic sheet underneath) they probably won't rebuild where the plastic is exposed. I would rip it out and start over with new foundation.
    If it is Rite-Cell or similar, in theory you can just scrape it off and they will re-draw it. Probably wouldn't need to re-wax it, unless you boiled it clean. (don't know if that works either)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Maple Plain MN
    Posts
    37

    Sad

    It apears it is duragilt. I am not sure as we didn't have that stuff 40 yrs ago. It is clear and has metal edges. The wax comes off very easy.
    Reading between the lines, it apears you all prefer the "old" style wired all wax foundation. I have some of that left from the olden days. Enough for my 2 hives but maybe 40 boxes of the newer stuff.

    ------------------
    E N Minnesota

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    mn, wi, tx
    Posts
    174

    Post

    The foundation that you are calling "newer stuff" is actually "older stuff". The duragilt foundation is hated by many beekeepers, myself included. At certain age/humidity/temprature combinations the wax tended to peel of the thin clear plastic and bees would never touch it again. The "newer stuff" now is "Permadent", "Pierco", "Ritecell", or "Plasticell". These are embossed in the plastic with the cell design, then sprayed with beeswax. Even if some wax were to come off the plastic, the bees would still rework on this newer generation of plastic foundation. Duragilt however, if much of the wax is missing or peeling, it is better to simply tear it out, clean up the frame, and pop in a sheet of the newer types of foundation.

    [This message has been edited by beeman 202 (edited May 16, 2003).]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    I had pretty good luck with duracomb which is the same without the metal edges. But if it ever comes off of the plastic it's hopeless. Fortunately I seldom had that problem.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Maple Plain Minnesota
    Posts
    182

    Lightbulb

    Thanks for the information.
    Now I know why the foundation I have was named DURAGuILT.

    BEEn Stung; Previousley known as ?honey?

    ------------------
    Erwin

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