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Thread: buying a nuc

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok, usa
    Posts
    10

    Post

    I just lost a colony to wax moths. I wish to buy a nuc to start over. I live in Oklahoma, and would like to buy from this general region. Any suggestions? Thanks,
    ...r.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159
    If you want to drive to Wichita to get them, I could fix you up around April 1st to the 15th.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,386

    Post

    HROGERS has small hives for sale sometimes in Texarkana.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,081

    Post

    Hotlands,
    Just trying to help, and I am not sure of your beekeeping experience. But wax moths do not kill hives. A weak queen, a queenless hive for an extended period, and a number of other conditions can allow the moths to infest and eventually take over a hive. I hope you seek the reason the moths had this oppotunity so it does not happen again.

    Oh yeah....welcome aboard.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok, usa
    Posts
    10

    Post

    Thanks to all for the replies to my nuc inquiry. I'm a novice, so I had thought I cold buy a nuc now to be in place and laying by end of january. Guess I'll cool my heels 'til mid-spring. By the way, I found a Tulsa source. Bjorn... yes, I have been advised that wax moths are really a symptom, more than a cause, of a troubled colony. I haven't yet determined what weakened the hive so. The population was down to a few hundred dead and extremely weak bees when I inspected this past weekend. The queen was dead in their midst. Further inspection revealed a second dead queen laying on the bottom board. There was a fair amount of uneaten honey. At this point I don't have any idea, really.
    Thanks again,
    R.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    761

    Cool

    Hey Hotlands,
    You probably already thought of this, but you should preserve whatever combs and honey you can for your new bees - it would give them a big boost. Freezing the combs for a day or two will kill the wax moth lavae.

    Welcome and Merry Christmas

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok, usa
    Posts
    10

    Post

    Thanks, DB. Actually I already donated the salvagable honey to the colony next door, after examining it for signs of moths.

    anyone have a theory what might have made this lost colony vulnerable to the moths?
    ...hotlands.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,386

    Post

    Failing queen. No queen. Varroa mites. Those would be the top three. After that there's any kind of brood disease (Chaulk, EFB and AFB).

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