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Thread: big mess,help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ohio, ill U.S.A.
    Posts
    22

    Post

    I bought two hives from an old beekeeper which he started as nucs by getting frames from several hives. The problem is he only used nine frames in each and spaced them equal distance apart. I'm sure you know what happened. The bees have built bridge and bur combs all over the place and it is almost impossible to remove them for inspection without tearing everything up. I have put a deep super on each and they are drawing out the foundation. One hive even has some larva in the top super. What can I do to remedy this situation? I would like to have ten frames in my brood chambers but can't squeeze another one in without crushing the bees and possibly the queen. HELP PLEASE. BOBBY

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Medford Lakes,NJ,USA
    Posts
    94

    Question

    Bobby, Most of the hives I have worked with lately use ONLY 9 frames for ease of moving them around and checking them out. The difference with your hive is that they were evenly spaced and the 9 frames should be fairly tight against one another. As for your problem you might try getting in touch with another beekeeper or a beekeeping club, most have mentors available to suggest help. I would try to capture the queen and then clean up as much as I could trying not to do too much damage, ASAP.

    [This message has been edited by NewBee (edited 05-31-2000).]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,466

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bobby field:
    What can I do to remedy this situation? I would like to have ten frames in my brood chambers but can't squeeze another one in without crushing the bees and possibly the queen. HELP PLEASE. BOBBY[/B]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Bobby -

    I would suggest you put a queen excluder between the nine frame spaced brood box and the new one with ten frames of foundation making sure the queen is in the ten frame chamber. Put feed to the hive and let it go. The brood will hatch out of the lower one and then honey will be put back in. Once all the brood have emerged, take a long serrated knife and cut the comb back flush with the top bar, push them all tight together and put a tenth frame in.

    Now I would put this brood chamber back on top of the other one and remove the excluder. The bees will do the rest.

    Regards,
    Barry


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Sequim / Wa / USA
    Posts
    175

    Lightbulb

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bobby field:
    I bought two hives from an old beekeeper which he started as nucs by getting frames from several hives. The problem is he only used nine frames in each and spaced them equal distance apart. I'm sure you know what happened. The bees have built bridge and bur combs all over the place and it is almost impossible to remove them for inspection without tearing everything up. I have put a deep super on each and they are drawing out the foundation. One hive even has some larva in the top super. What can I do to remedy this situation? I would like to have ten frames in my brood chambers but can't squeeze another one in without crushing the bees and possibly the queen. HELP PLEASE. BOBBY<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Hi Bob & Barry

    No problem what was suggested !
    Here is the poop from my observation and from another Gent.
    The application of 9 frames has reasons :
    1)The larger spacing affords the more positive exposure to miticides during application.
    2)depending on the colony behavior the bees tend to build so close , that is is almost impossble to remove any frame without squashing a number of workeres or worst , the queen even though the first frame is removed at the outermost position.
    3) If the 9 frame method is used, do NOT start with foundations but with DRAWN combs.
    All my colonies have the lower brood box with 9 frames and no advers pattern developed, I.e. : No burr combs other than the odd normal one they always do, which is easily cut in place with a hacksaw blade if required.
    My second broodbox has still 10 frames but I will replace them with 9 in the future.
    All this is still experimental but at this time it looks good.
    Also, these spacers are available in 10 / 9 and 8 frame configuration. The manufacturer makes them, sells them, therefore somebody utilises them.
    All supers are fitted with 9 frames to facilitate the decapping during harvest.
    Best beeing
    catfish

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ohio, ill U.S.A.
    Posts
    22

    Post

    Thanks for all of the replies. They are very helpful. Heres the plan. I have built two new IPM bottom boards for my hives and want to install them so I'm going to reverse the hive bodys so the nine frame will be on top, making sure the queen is in the ten frame super and install the excluder,at the same time install the bottom boards. Then when the nine frame is empty of brood I will do as suggested, take it off and slice the comb down to size and replace it. I am going to try and produce cut comb honey only,no extraction, so I want two supers of ten frames. I hope to either make ross rounds or the old squares eventually but for now just cut comb untill I get use to working with the bees again and sort of feel my way along. I remember what a job it was to produce the squares years ago but I was working two jobs then, trying to keep the wolf away from the door. Since I've retired??? I have more time on my hands now??? Thanks to all for the help. Bobby

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