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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Waxhaw (Charlotte) NC
    Posts
    56
    I've been hired to trap out some hives from houses in and around Charlotte, NC. The funnel/lure hive method was a snap to do with a nectar flow on, but not doing so well with no nectar flow occuring. Some of you talk about using a plastic pipe to route the bees from the funnel tip into the lure hive. I've been trying that, running the tube uphill and then @4" into the lure hive, with the exit on the bottom board. The bees from the houses go up the tube end, but actually turn around and retreat downill to their hive entrance rather than enter the weak lure hive. The bees in the lure hive don't even seem to know the tube is there & no fighting is going on. I've tried spraying sugar water aound the tube end and on the floor, but that has not changed any bees mind. I assume that using the tube means that I need to enter the lure hive elsewhere. Can any of you relate just where that entrance should be?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    I'm not clear where the field bees from the hive being trapped end up. Are they getting back in somewhere? If they can't get in they will eventually give up and join the lure hive, but they can be pretty determined for a while.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Post

    If your exit is one-way, the bees have no choice but to join the bait hive. I've done this many times and put the exit cone a couple of inches from the hive entrance >> It takes 6-8 weeks but virtually all the bees (except the queen) come out.
    Triangle Bees

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Waxhaw (Charlotte) NC
    Posts
    56

    Post

    Mike Bush, in one case the bees have been determined & ingenious in getting back into their hive in the house. They have chewed through asphalt shingles and builder applied liqiud nails to find ways back in. So I've used metal screen and steel wool to hold them back. But after 2 months, there is no real build-up in the lure hive population. With the other hive, there is no visible re-entry success, nor is there any big collection of bees looking to get back into the hive in the home.. It seems to me that both hives are getting weaker, but there is no appreciable increase in the population of the lure hive.
    I'd like to see the field bees and orienting bees go into the lure hive at the end of the day, rather than just "disappear". This occured in the Spring, but is not happening now, that's why I'm asking about the plastic tubing.
    My other concern is about getting to the point when its time to to rob out the honey from the house hive. I need to gague when the house hive is weak enough to be overrun with a strong robbing hive. This is very hard for me to judge while the bees are so lethargic due to no nectar flow being available. Any ideas on this issue?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    wills point,tx,usa
    Posts
    130

    Post

    why are you trapping if you are going to tear into the house anyway? also, wax moths are more likely to destroy the comb/honey than more bees.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    >Mike Bush, in one case the bees have been determined & ingenious in getting back into their hive in the house.

    They always are.

    >They have chewed through asphalt shingles and builder applied liqiud nails to find ways back in.

    Wow. I've seen them collect it for propolis but never seen them chew through them.

    >So I've used metal screen and steel wool to hold them back. But after 2 months, there is no real build-up in the lure hive population.

    Then they are getting back in somewhere.

    >With the other hive, there is no visible re-entry success, nor is there any big collection of bees looking to get back into the hive in the home..

    If there are none on building up in either the lure or on the cone then they must be getting back in somewhere.

    > It seems to me that both hives are getting weaker, but there is no appreciable increase in the population of the lure hive.

    Then they are either dying or they are still getting in and out.

    >I'd like to see the field bees and orienting bees go into the lure hive at the end of the day, rather than just "disappear".

    Nothing just dissappears.

    >I need to gague when the house hive is weak enough to be overrun with a strong robbing hive.

    It will have to be very weak, the robbing hive will have to be very strong and you'll have to bait it. I'd be sure they are pretty much done for before expecting this to work.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7

    Post

    Congrats on your success with this DBL

    I have not had success "trapping out" bees and have heard similarly from others when I was still trying to take hives this way. I now do not remove the bees unless I can get at them. Too much honey and wax gets left behind to rot, ferment, or attract another swarm.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Post

    Hi Joe,
    I only "trap out" bees that can't be removed in any other way. For example, I'm currently doing a removal where the bees have their nest in the hollow of an I-beam inside a brick wall (this is a medical doctor's office building). Removing the bees any other way would be very expensive and they don't want to poison them. The "trap out" process I use is very effective and the customer is happiy to pay > $500 for the removal. Also, I made 5 NUCs from the last one of these. Overall, I think these type removals are less work than opening a wall/floor/ceiling.

    Bait the trap hive with 1 good frame of open brood and nurse bees plus 3 or 4 frames of drawn comb and/or foundation. The field bees just can't resist off-loading their pollen and nectar to hungry brood and don't try too hard to get back into the original nest.
    Triangle Bees

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Post

    Ps: After NO more bees are coming out of OR trying to get back into the original nest, replace the bait hive with a very strong (30 - 40K bees) hive that has no honey (you robbed them out). Smear some of THEIR honey around the entrance to the orig hive. By the time they're finished with it there won't be a ounce of honey remaining!
    Triangle Bees

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    I trapped out a colony 4 years ago in late august. The bees were no problem getting out, the problem was keeping them out. I could only check on them once a week. When I would get back down there, I would find they had found another way in. I finally caulked all their holes and got them out. I removed the trap and got the nest cleaned out. I told the homeowner to fix the spot where they were getting in and left.
    The following spring, I got a call from them again. They hadn't repaired the hole and while standing in the back yard, the homeowner watched a new swarm take up residence.
    I decided not to trap the new swarm out. I opened the living room ceiling and vacuumed them out.
    Jon, N6VC/5

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