Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    Last week I cleaned some sawdust out of the workshop and threw it in the garden. Imagine my surprise when I found 100 bees on it, carrying it back to the hive. I know it's just cellulose but do the bees know more than that? I've heard of them stealing cattle feed but this smacks of desperation.

    Dickm

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
    Posts
    512

    Post

    I've heard of bees picking up sawdust, when they are desperate for pollen and no sources are available. I'd throw a pollen patty on them right away!

    ------------------
    Gregg Stewart

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    My bees have a serious caffine addiction. My sister throws her coffee grounds in her flower bed and the bees are rolling in it every chance they get.

    They collect many things that they can not use, check out your bottom boards for a sample. Last weekend I saw half kernals of milo on the boards, (horse feed) I knew right away where they had been.

    I have pollen out and patties on and they still gather stuff, it's in their nature.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    You know they really haul pollen in their legs. Don't you wonder why they want to roll in it? I wonder if they dust, like chickens and cows and horses do? Chickens do it to get rid of paraistes like lice and mites.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    OK, What experience (of the board) can I draw on to create an open air feeder for pollen substitute. I'm using brood-builder from Dadant. I tried to feed once with poor results. I've pattied most of them but would like to watch them gathering.

    Dickm

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    I haven't had any experience with this Dick. But I've put out patties and they don't eat it open air. Just inside. Maybe only the nurse bees? Foragers maybe only prefer the powder?


    I dunno....


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    MB,
    So do you think they are trying to de-louse/de-mite themselves? Do you think coffee might be some sort of deterant that makes the mites detach or something, similar to a sugar roll?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Dickm,
    I pull weak hives to my back yard from out-apiaries and have a permanant feeding station. Its a good 150+ ft away. Its just a bunch of boardman feeders on a table. But I also have some five gallon lids that I put pollen substitute on, and the bees collect as much of the pollen than the sugar. I have also used old cookie sheets or bowls, but the bees need something they can climb up and groom themselves on. I also have a 12 inch wide board, about two ft long, that I just dump it onto to. The bees know this station and collect when the weather is cold and I know they would not be doing anything else if not for this station. Works great.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >You know they really haul pollen in their legs. Don't you wonder why they want to roll in it? I wonder if they dust, like chickens and cows and horses do? Chickens do it to get rid of paraistes like lice and mites.


    I would really like to see some close up shots of bees applying pollen to their leg baskets. I have never seen any pictures of this. I understand that they use their front legs to pick it up and move it to the rear legs, somehow using the hair on the legs like a comb.

    Hauling those kernels of grain is something else, must be using the front legs for that.

    I didn't see any mites on the bees rolling in the coffee, didn't mean there were none. Just fun watching their behaviour really close up, nose to nose. They had some of the really small grounds in the pollen baskets, but it really looked like they were digging for the small stuff by moving the larger pieces out of the way.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >OK, What experience (of the board) can I draw on to create an open air feeder for pollen substitute.

    I mostly feed above the hive in the Miller feeders. When I feed outside I will set up a Miller feeder with syrup away from the yard with a bottom and cover.

    Feeding dry and pattied pollen away from the yard in the open, I use two saw horses with two 2'x3' baking pans. I set the first pan on the horses with the dry and or pattied pollen in it, and set bricks around the edges of the pan. I then set another pan inverted above the other on the bricks to hold it up and provide an entrance. I also put bricks on the top of it all to keep the wind from blowing it apart. Works very well for me.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    They don't seem to like the patties so much in outdoor feeders. I'm feeding by putting dry pollen on the bottom board of a nuc mixed with some pollen substitute powder. The bees seem to want to roll in it a lot.

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