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Thread: IN THE DOGHOUSE

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    5,159

    Sad

    Here in beautiful Cowtown Ks. we haven't had a real hard freeze yet. We still have green leaves and blooming plants all around.

    However, seventy five miles north east up at the farm in the beautiful and seanic Kansas Flinthills, it's D-E-D dead. No blooms, no where.

    Well, it was absolutely beautiful this weekend, balmy, high sixtys, and the girls were out and buzzin' everywhere. And the only thing they could find they liked was the horse feed, and they love it!

    Dear old dad put out the feed for his 'girls', about a gallon and a half each per horse, of his special blend of rolled grain and the horses couldn't get past the bees to eat. The bees absolutely covered the grain to the point that you could hardly see it. The grain bin door looked like the front of hive getting ready to swarm. The word was out and every forraging bee from twenty three hives were working overtime, a virtual feeding frenzie.

    Muzzles getting stung, whinniening, and thrashing about, heals up in the air, starving horses, and it's all my fault... good thing it was my birthday, or I'd be sleepin with the hounds.

    We got them fed before it got up into the fortys today so the poor ponies didn't starve, but dad says he's gonna need more honey next year for all the horse feed the bees are carrying off.

    ------------------
    Bullseye Bill
    Smack dab in the middle of the country.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    1,262

    Post

    That's a nice post BB.

    The bees were out gathering here too. Sounds like all is well on your end.

  3. #3
    kookaburra Guest

    Post

    Do the bees actually use the oat dust? Or is it just like pollen so they collect it but can't use it?
    Just curious, I've seen it posted before about this behaviour.

    -Rick

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,729

    Post

    Mine were all out yesterday. I had the feeders (that are away from the hives) full so they were all over that. But today it's raining.

    One thing about having hives around during a dearth, they will get all OVER something they want. It's something to see thousands of bees all over your feed or your feeders or some empty equipment you accidently left by the back door.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    Post

    >Do the bees actually use the oat dust? Or is it just like pollen so they collect it but can't use it?


    They do collect many things that they can not use and I am sure that some of the larger particles of ground grain (milo, corn, wheat, oats, etc.) will fit into that catagory too.

    However they were collecting mainly dust. I watched as they would roll the particles of grain around and they were taking their tounges and licking the dust off. I believe that they will get more nutritional value from the grain dust than they would get from some pollen. Did you know that dandilion pollen has almost no nutritional value? It's filler at best, but still a good carrier of nectar or honey to help in the feeding of the young.

    Oh no, I can see it now. Daisy will now be making little bee bread cakes for the bees...

    Bill

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Post

    >Oh no, I can see it now. Daisy will now be making little bee bread cakes for the bees...

    My guess is she already does.

    My bees will collect grain dust from the chicken's feed when there is no pollen. They lose interest when there is pollen. I'm sure they use it as pollen.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Arnold, Peoples Republik of Maryland
    Posts
    31

    Post

    >Mine were all out yesterday. I had the feeders (that are away from the hives) full so they were all over that. But today it's raining.

    Hi Michael,

    Just curious, what do you use for your away-from-the-hives feeders? Also, about how far away is far enough?

    Thanks!
    Bill

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
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    378

    Post

    Since it hasn't froze yet, my bees are able to get some last second nectar and pollen from dandelions and white clover... but it doesn't make up for a miserable year. Still, I appreciate a mid-November mini-flow.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Post

    >Just curious, what do you use for your away-from-the-hives feeders? Also, about how far away is far enough?

    I will preface this with my experience with this. The first times I tried feeding away from the hive set off robbing. Feeding all the hives inside seemed to work better but then sometimes that set off robbing too. I finally decided there are just times that the bees want to rob. Due to posts here that seemed to contradict my experience I decided to try again.

    So I reduce all the entraces, sometimes I put screens on the week ones (see Brushy Mt screen doors. I cut a notch in them so the bees can get out the top) and I also have been "Daisying" them (vicks on the entrances of the hives being robbed).

    I have a variety of feeders (just what was around). I haven't had a lot of luck with the Miller kind where the bees in theory can't get into the space where the feed is, because they DO get in and can't get out. Any crack big enough and they are in. The top feeders from Brusy Mt work well. They have floats and free access. On a sunny day you could even leave the lids off. I just put the feeder on a bottom board with a cover on it. I also have several boxes full of the frame feeders from Brushy Mt. These are ridgid and only have access in a small center area with a screen for a ladder. I fill all the frames. Leave a quarter inch to 3/8 gap between the frame feeders and put this box on a bottom board and put another solid bottom board on top. That way the bees have easy access.

    I think a couple of hundred yards would be best, but between the needs and traffic patterns of the people, horses and bees on my little 3 acre place, they are only about 20 yards away from the hives. There was a robbing spree earlier this year, but between smaller entrances all around (both the robbers and the robbees) and the vicks and the screen doors, it seems to have stopped. They are still at the feeders though on warm days.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    Post

    I might as well get in here and say how I trough feed my bees. LOL

    I use quart jars with the holes in the lids that come with the boardman feeders.

    I fill up about four to eight jars of syrup and cap. I lay these upside down, "well of course" on my gridded patio table and the bees fly to the table and either go down through the table or fly up underneath the table to get to the jars.

    I put this table as far away from the hives as I feel like pulling the table out in the yard. But I only have four hives. This might not work for lots of hives because the bees would become to thick on the jars and I would worry that they are hurting one another's wings. This is something I read recently. I don't know if it's true or not because I've never seen a bee get her wing hurt by crowding at the jars to feed but it does make sense that it could happen. They come and they go.

    I'll have to find a good bee bread recipe now, anyone know of a good one? LOL

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    jackson county, indiana
    Posts
    27

    Post

    A lot of aminal feed containes mollasses to make it more palatable to the animals. Was this boughten feed or some he ground himself?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    Post

    >A lot of aminal feed containes mollasses to make it more palatable to the animals. Was this boughten feed or some he ground himself?
    IP:


    No mollasses, just ground grain. Mostly corn, milo, oats, kinda looks like scratch grain but ground up. I tryed to call him to get his recepie, but he's been sick and was asleep. Sis said the bees are still after the grain and the horses. Sixty two degrees today.

    Bill

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    >I'll have to find a good bee bread recipe now, anyone know of a good one? LOL

    In a mixing bowl place one measure finely powdered grain dust. Dry mix one measure of bee pollen. Add a pinch of mineral salt. Sift through flour sifter. Stir in 1/2 measure of honey, you may substitute 1/4 measure of 2-1 sugar syrup if you have sold all your honey. Add 1/8 tsp of Honey B Healthy or your favorite essential oils. Pour batter into drawn comb and place in hive. Or pour into thimbles and bake in oven on low heat until toothpick comes out dry, serve with light sugar syrup at room temperature. Music and candelight optional.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    Wink

    In a mixing bowl place one measure finely powdered grain dust. Dry mix one measure of bee pollen. Add a pinch of mineral salt. Sift through flour sifter. Stir in 1/2 measure of honey, you may substitute 1/4 measure of 2-1 sugar syrup if you have sold all your honey. Add 1/8 tsp of Honey B Healthy or your favorite essential oils. Pour batter into drawn comb and place in hive. Or pour into thimbles and bake in oven on low heat until toothpick comes out dry, serve with light sugar syrup at room temperature. Music and candelight optional.

    ;^) Bill, you are really somethin, u know that? <Bee Hugs>


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