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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    255

    Post

    wowsa... I went to my bees today and they were very pissed... I opened the box up and found several frames of capped brood in the upper deep (use 2 for brood/honey). Lots of bees. They didn't seem to be doing much with the honey super (on top of the two deeps, obviuosly)--but, Question 1: I was just curious if it is normal to have so much capped brood in upper deep? There was a lot of capped honey, too (probably 6-7 frames).

    I didn't bother going into the bottom deep, I probably should have, but they were very very very very aggresive, I was stung about 20 times through beesuit Good to get a dose of venom, I guess [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Question 2: I have two hives that were placed in yard at same time, one is kicking butt with honey production... the other is well below average. Should I requeen the colony that isn't producing as much honey? Should I put some of the drawn foundation into the other hive? The less productive hive isn't even drawing that much comb in the honey super. Their upper deep is jammed packed with capped honey... but, that is it Any ideas/suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    D in the burgh

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,408

    Post

    Can't say about deeps, I don't use them. But I can say that having brood in multiple boxes (UBN) unlimited brood nest is quite usual. When I left out the queen excluder I've had brood in all 7 medium supers, and to have brood in 3-4 medium supers is quite normal.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    This is what I would do. Put an extracted super on where the capped deep is or extract the full super, they need more room.
    If I understand your situation correctly I would swap positions with the colonies in mid afternoon when the foragers are working, that way the hives will sort of eqaulize and fortify the weaker colony. Just my opinion.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

    Post

    I'm running eight frame mediums now and I often find brood in four boxes. When I DID run deeps I often found brood in both boxes.

    Yes it's not abnormal a good queen will often lay both boxes up with a lot of brood in each.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    255

    Post

    that is good to hear--- I don't like abnormal [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Thanks,

    d

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Oceano, California, USA
    Posts
    467

    Post

    You could switch posistions as was suggested, but only if there's a flow, otherwise you could create a war that will leave one or both hives dead.

    BTW the hive you really want to requeen isn't the weak one! If you give your location and current flow status, perhaps some practical advice will be suggested.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

    Post

    >BTW the hive you really want to requeen isn't the weak one!

    Could you elaborate, please?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Oceano, California, USA
    Posts
    467

    Post

    I lived in Africa for 9 years and I don't like mean bees. His hive is mean, unless he's a masochist he should requeen that one. Mean hives can also, to a lesser extent, be calmed by reducing their populations. He could requeen the mean hive, and take some brood out of that same hive and strengthen the weak one, which would probably be better this time of year than requeening the weak one.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    Not knowing the weather at the time he opened it, how do you know it's mean? Let me pick the time to open them, and every hive you have will be on you like ahb. It sounds like you are telling him to replace a good, strong laying queen for whatever he may be able to find this time of year, when you don't have the info to know. Not so good advice in my opinion.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Oceano, California, USA
    Posts
    467

    Post

    And it sounds like you haven't had much experience in beekeeping, or at least not much with good queens.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,410

    Post

    Sounds like you haven't had much experience with a major dearth and 100 degree temps for weeks. The best hives can get mean on any given day. If they are mean when everything else is calm, then I think about re-queening. I also know there is a big difference between a big, kicking hive and a mean hive.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    Tim, that's almost funny. My grandchrildren are about the same age as your children, and I would guess I have been keeping bees at least since you were in elementary school, if not before. The day you go into your gentlest hive and get 6 to 8 hundred stings in the time it takes you to run a hundred yards, you will have a much better understanding of bees and the weather.
    I just hope you are prepared when that day comes, because it seems that you aren't willing to learn any other way.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Oceano, California, USA
    Posts
    467

    Post

    "I just hope you are prepared when that day comes, because it seems that you aren't willing to learn any other way."

    9 years South Africa, 6 months Papua New Guinea 13 years in California keeping bees.

    "The best hives can get mean on any given day."

    ? It can be 100 degrees in the shade under attack by ants and if you smoke a good hive and go into it you don't get swarmed and stung 20 times through your suit.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

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    I would put the weak hive on the watch list for spring requeening. Maybe even with a queen from the other hive. Expecially if that was the hive you got stung in. I've never been stung 20 times and I hope I never will. Through the suit? I'd be lookin' at that suit, man.

    Part of the reason I'm keeping bees is to raise a queen from good survivor/producer hives and put her in slower hives. In my opinion just one of those made the world a better place. One stinging incident is not enough reason to requeen em. But it should alert you to the potential.

    Like you needed another opinion.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

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    When I find a hive hot I put a red pin in the lid. If I find it hot again, I requeen it. I like to give them the benefit of the doubt that it wasn't just a bad day for them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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