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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    Hello all!

    Ok ok ok... I made a mistake. I killed the old queen and then interduced the new queen in ther queen cage with the candy exposed.

    a lot of people tell me that I should have waited at least 2 hours to two days until I put the new queen and queen cage inside the hive.

    ButI didnt listen. Go figure eh?

    I put the new queen and cage in on tuesday.

    I am worried...panicing and somewhat emotional that they will not except the new queen using the method that I did.

    Can anyone reassure me that they too have done this method and that it has worked???

    thank you all!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Lebanon
    Posts
    6

    Post

    Actually... I cannot assure you because I never did this...

    However... from my reading... you wait about three days... kill any queen cells they make and introduce the new queen as you said.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    N. Ridgeville, OH, USA
    Posts
    352

    Post

    Wish I could. I've only been successful 1 out of 5 attempts doing it this way. Several "rookie" mistakes in requeeening on my part, I'm sure. I tried a double-screen board last time with great success. I think I'll stick to that from now on.

    Good Luck!
    Doug

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    Chill there Chef!

    I can not tell you how many times that I have gone in to a hive, "deleted" the old queen and added a new one via a shipping cage - all in about 10 minutes and never gave it another thought.
    Takes them about 4 hours if I remember correctly to start sensing a phermone loss.

    I would not mess with it now, leave it bee for a week or so then go in. Going in now they might just ball her.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Lebanon
    Posts
    6

    Post

    Well... there is the longer way of doing this... (the way I follow since I cannot find queens)...

    Put a frame from another hive with fresh eggs in it... and they will make their own... but it takes about 20 days till the queen is ready to lay eggs...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Rockville, Indiana. USA
    Posts
    45

    Post

    Chef,

    You say that you exposed the candy on the queen cage.

    My question is this: Have they released her yet?
    If not you might consider pulling the cage back out of the hive. Give them a couple days to realize they are not queen right.

    Then put the cage back.

    Just a thought ,but no guarantees.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    san antonio.texas USA
    Posts
    488

    Post

    More often than not, I dequeen and requeen at the same time. I have a good success rate for introduction. It is better to let the hive sit a few hours, but I don't consider it a requirement. I find that waiting before introduction helps particulary with large or defensive hives. Sometimes it takes a long time for the bees to release the queen... such as hard candy etc. I think requeening in late afternoon helps a bit also.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    830

    Smile

    Requeening in fall is the easiest way with a very high success rate. Much easier than during summer where I always use a cage.

    When you removed the old lady wait 2-3 hours. Than put the new queen in a jar with a little bit water and honey and let her struggle till she is getting tired. During this time she is getting more and more anxious and produces a high amount of pheromone.

    After a while (5-10 minutes) she is moving slower and slower and is totally wet with honey. Now put her on the landing board a little bit away from enter, as soon as the guard bees find the queen they starting to clean her. During this process she produces also more pheromone than usually.

    As soon as she has a rest and comes to live again she goes slowly in the new hive without any problems, all cleaning bees helping her to go inside.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    More often than not, I dequeen and requeen at the same time. I have a good success rate for introduction. particulary with large or defensive hives thatI don't want to go back into when they are queenless. Sometimes it takes a long time for the bees to release the queen... such as hard candy but i poke a very small hole thru the candy without distrubing the queen inside before I place the cage in the hive on the bottom board at the back with the screen up. I don't have the time to keep going back to the hives. We requeen 250 every year. With the cage placed on the bottom board we can use a wire later to remive the cage from the hive
    Clint

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

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