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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, Mi
    Posts
    7

    Post

    Hello, I'm a bit of a rookie and I have a couple of questions. I started a new hive a year ago. I'm in lower Michigan, and one very cold, but sunny winter day, I saw hundreds of my bees on the snow dead. Almost like they all came out to relieve themselves, and got too cold and froze. I wrapped my hive, maybe this had something to do with it, Anyway, when I looked in the hive this spring, the hive was nearly void of dead bees, and my top hive body was/is 80% full of honey. My question is after I put my new package of bees in the lower hive body, how soon should put on the top hive body that is full of honey?? Thanks for the help !!! John.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    >Hello, I'm a bit of a rookie and I have a couple of questions. I started a new hive a year ago. I'm in lower Michigan, and one very cold, but sunny winter day, I saw hundreds of my bees on the snow dead. Almost like they all came out to relieve themselves, and got too cold and froze.

    There are always some bees doing this all winter. If all of the bees did this, maybe you had tracheal mites?

    >I wrapped my hive, maybe this had something to do with it

    I used to think that, but after watching my observation hive, which is in the house, I don't think so anymore. I think they fly out to die because they are about to anyway.

    >Anyway, when I looked in the hive this spring, the hive was nearly void of dead bees

    That's odd. Another reason I'd suspect tracheal mites.

    >and my top hive body was/is 80% full of honey. My question is after I put my new package of bees in the lower hive body, how soon should put on the top hive body that is full of honey??

    You could put it on from the first. What's in the bottom box? If I had that kind of stores, I'd probably put them in a box with five frames of honey and pollen (on the outside) and five frames of empty comb in the middle. After they have that going well put the rest of the frames on in the other box.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, Mi
    Posts
    7

    Post

    Thanks Michael for replying. Yep, even my screened bottom board hardly had a dead bee on it. I wonder if possibly the hive swarmed late in the fall, and left the hive queenless going into winter?
    The bottom hive body was really just empty, dark brown brood frames mostly, maybe a little bid of honey on a couple of the outside frames. I figured since that hive body was mostly used for brood rearing, then that would be the one I put the new package in. So then, if I put the honey laden hive body that was on top on the bottom, the bee's won't care about the fact that the old brood frames are now on top?

    As far as mites go, I didn't treat for them last fall. I got 75 lbs of honey, [img]smile.gif[/img] (not bad for a brand new hive!) and they seemed to be quite healthy going into winter, but I guess maybe I was wrong about that
    Thanks again for any suggestions.

    John.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    Just to clarify, it does not sound like Varroa mites. With Varroa I'd expect lots of dead bees.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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