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  1. #21
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    Jul 2003
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    Kansas
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    1,262

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tiller, Oregon USA
    Posts
    209

    Post

    thank you kindly

    ------------------
    the ~ox-{ at www.singingfalls.com

  3. #23
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    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    Post

    ox, i see you're a homesteader...

    what exactly is this?


  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    I'm a wanna bee homesteader.

    Been wanting to since the early seventies and that's how I got into bees.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tiller, Oregon USA
    Posts
    209

    Post

    It is a way of life. A homesteader is one who has made a lifestyle choice to be weaned as much as possible from modern society and eek out an existance in nature (mainly) for various reasons. We do everything the hard way Organic gardening, homegrown meat, hand hewn buidings, hand dug wells. Our organic garden is the main source of veggies and of course our bees are for sweets and mead. I trained a pair of oxen years back and used them to skid logs for the timber frame barn I've made. I've only got one ox left now. During our days in Montana (12 years) we lived off the grid using solar panels for a 12 volt system. Very independent sorts we are. Now we're in Umpqua National Forest in SW Oregon

    Our particular genre of homesteader also has deep spiritual convictions centered on the bible. We are shepherds/crafters by vocation - raising angora goats, harvesting their mohair, spinning and weaving it into blankets, rugs and other garments. We specialize in naturally colored angora goats which is a relatively new trend. Please look at our web site and you'll see what we do. The link is in my signature.

    ------------------
    the ~ox-{ at www.singingfalls.com

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tiller, Oregon USA
    Posts
    209

    Post

    Bush = "I'm a wanna bee homesteader.

    Been wanting to since the early seventies and that's how I got into bees."

    Yes that is when we did it. Dirt poor and ill prepared, newly wed, young and full of hope. (the modern day american peasant) We have little regret. God has been good to us. We have learned and are learning. It is never too late Mr. Bush Although I must admit, those who opted (in those days) not to do it are retiring soon. One can not retire as a "homesteader". My near neighbor is 87 years old. Last winter he cut, split and stacked twelve chords of Madrone wood. Today he is bailing hay.

    ------------------
    the ~ox-{ at www.singingfalls.com

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    I understand Ox......

    Modern life has become a rat race... On the wheel, runnin yer @@@ off and going no where.

    I went wild crafting a couple of days ago.

    Well actually to be completely truthful, I took the girls to the pasture where our new little filly is until she's brought to the farm where daughter will begin training her.... but we walked a long time till we found the horses... While out there I decided to do some wild crafting. There was this one plant that just seemed to call out to me..

    I pulled up a handfull. Didn't know what it was... Did some research in one of my handbooks and didn't learn much....

    But learned quit a bit about it on the internet.

    I learned that one of it's names is Prairie Mimosa... And it's being studied here in Salina Kansas... It restores the ground everywhere it grows with nitrogen... The seed are real high in protein, can be used in salads or for cooking etc.. livestock enjoy eating it. I don't think it grows in your part of the US.

    After it was dried, I rolled some up and smoked it. It was a little harsh but overall, not a bad smoke.

    Wild crafting is something that homesteaders do... ?

    Does your family make your own remedies and such?


  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tiller, Oregon USA
    Posts
    209

    Post

    Mrs. Daisy: Yes, we often resort to what is available around us to deal with needs albeit we do grow a rather large herb garden for various purposes. Some medicenal, some culinary, dyers herbs, aromatics for insect pest control (which the bees seem to love) and not the least a very prosperous crop of bee balm (borage). This time of year the bees are many on the stands of borage, egyptian onions, and lavendar.
    My spouse has braught many an animal to safety and health using simple medicenals. On occasion they just don't work and we resort to synthetics. I hope to find a multifaceted solution to the be mite problem.

    ------------------
    the ~ox-{ at www.singingfalls.com

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    Post

    Ox

    You state that you're thinking about solutions to combat the bee problems.... Grand!

    We have inherited the problems created by mans interventions... we call civilization. LOL

    I have seven hives now. I used what is now called IPM for two years to help the colonies become established. This year so far, I've given the colonies nothing in way of pest management. I am experimenting on the addition of trace minerals into a water source this year. Agricultural methods have stripped the land...

    In three years since I began keeping bees, I've purchased and replaced one queen. She was consequently and quickly put out of the colony as I found her either dead or fainted on the top of the frames of the top super... days later. They wanted a queen of their own chosing I suppose, and the colony wintered well. I had no losses come spring this year. Only what appeared to be a sterile queen in one hive. But after combining and splitting weeks ago, that group is a number again.

    I form my own ideas as to what is going on or what to do to intervene with a hive... I decided to not intervene at all this year as I feel my hives are pretty well established after three years. In other words, the ones that succumb to mites etc. will succumb and I'll work with any that survive, if any survive at all.

    My colonies interact with local feral colonies that I decided to leave alone. At first thought, I was going to find the feral colony and bring them to my bee yard, but decided that this action would probably hurt my operation. The ferals seem to have overcome the mite problems. Maybe their genes have assisted my colonies to cope and survive with mites.... I'll know more by next spring.

    I look forward to reading about what you do to help your bees.


  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    The first misconpception is that this beekeeper is recommending beekeeping at night. She isn't. She is just saying that it can be just as enjoyable as working the bees during the day.

    I work my bees in the afternoon now, having been convinced the bees can handle the temperature issues with working top bar hives during the afternoon sun. I prefer to work mine between 1pm and 3:30 pm now. Before I would work them in the morning before the sun waws beating heavily on the top bars.

    ------------------
    Scot Mc Pherson
    Foundationless Small Cell Top Bar Hives
    BeeWiki: <A HREF="http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/beewiki/" TARGET=_blank>
    http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/beewiki/</A>
    Pics:
    http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    I read the posts too.

    I didn't read where she specifically recommends working in hives at night. Maybe she could clarify.....

    I've had a difficult time understanding her messages in the past.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Boynton Beach, Florida, USA
    Posts
    278

    Post

    Greetings,

    The beekeeper in question lives in a very unique environment. It can get hotter than 120 degrees there . And with very little ground cover in the desert, I bet the ground reflects lots of heat during the summer.

    Maybe working bees at night could have it's advantages. Maybe, like the desert creatures there, smart beekeepers only come out during the twilight hours:&gt; ).

    When I visited her operation during March, it was so hot it almost fried my poor winter adapted Wyoming brain. I just can't imagine what it's like at the end of July.

    Regards
    Dennis
    Thinking respect is a gift that's given, but if the truth were known none would deserve.

    [This message has been edited by topbarguy (edited June 22, 2004).]

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,309

    Post

    While I would never adopt her methods for our bees,I believe she is a smart woman and is innovating methods that deal with desert honey production.So while I would never attempt much night work here,I have to figure she knows what shes doing.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
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    Post

    It be interesting to know what lives in the desert that supplies pollen and nectar, the bees use to create the record breaking honey production she had last year.


  15. #35
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tiller, Oregon USA
    Posts
    209

    Post

    This brings to mind the entire arena of adaptation of a species to a given environment. There is no doubt in my mind that there is a wonderful capacity in creatures to go through genetic changes through a natural selective process. Any intervention on my part with this process has centered on different factors.
    Some are:
    1. Assistance to compensate for the initial radical change in environment. This usually is a process of several years of limited proping up of the critter so that it's vulnerability to new conditions doesn't get it too far down.
    2. A result of #1 is that several generations of offspring are born with progressively greater ability to handle the new set of conditions.
    3. Selectively culling the ones that just "don't cut it" and replacing them out of #2 stock.
    4. Adding stock that for one reason or another are further along in hardiness than the current pool. This is a tricky call. I've seen excellent newly added stock work in the reverse of "hybrid vigor" and hybrid weakness appears.

    On several occasions I have tried to circumvent this process with a hard "cold turkey" approach with little success. 'course I'm talking mammals here and bees may be another world. I have a hunch the same principles apply.
    In the case of the desert night bee keeper, it may be the perfect ticket to work the bees in the cool of the night.

    ------------------
    the ~ox-{ at www.singingfalls.com

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Ox.....

    Amen Brother!

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