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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rosedale, IN
    Posts
    501
    Sorry guys,

    Just one more quick question. As I mentioned earlier, this bee hive is in a HUGE black walnut tree. How can I know if there are other entrances? Impossible for a tree this large. Just try it and see??
    "The greatest threat is our own staggering ignorance and cavalier treatment of the natural world to which we belong."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,084

    Post

    Put the cone on the main entrance and watch. There probably is another and with the main entrance plugged it will become obvious. When you find it you cover it in #8 hardware cloth or screen wire. That spray foam insualation is nice for sealing up around rough bark.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    One of the things I do is completely cover the main entrance, without bothering with a cone, just block it. Then I come back the next day with the cone and nuc or hive, before I do anything I will sit and watch for awhile to see if anything is flying, and if it is I seal the hole that their're coming out of. Then i'll go ahead and set up my cone, and bait hive. This way I find most of the holes before I set up my bait hive. It can get tricky trying to find holes with the bait hive flying too.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  4. #4

    Post

    Word of caution on peggjams method which I'm sure was just a slip not to mention. This should not be used on colonies in occupied houses as you will likely get a very disturbing call from home owner in short order.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    Thought we were talking about a tree?? :confused:
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  6. #6

    Post

    I know what you ment and you know what you ment It was just a side note for any newbees that might miss the tree thing and try with a house. Hate to see it applied out of context.

    [size="1"][ June 02, 2006, 09:26 PM: Message edited by: onlygoodSHBisdeadone ][/size]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    I don't know...might be fun hearing a terrified homeowner screaming something about ....bees in the house . Wonder if that would qualifiy as an emergancey removal .
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  8. #8

    Post

    I don't know if you saw the forum I posted last month on a cone removal I had to do but I just about found out.... Owner said he tried to seal entrance with some "tuff stuff" foam the day before he called me and lucky for him it had set up in the nozzel and wouldn't spray. To top it off his basement had a drop ceiling with a plunum space and when I lifted the tile along block wall opp where colony was bees had already found a crack around joist and was wash boarding against 2x8. They would have been all over his house if he sealed it........ cha ching

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,084

    Post

    The problem I generally have with the cone method is the owner is totally unaware of how many bees there are, totally unaware of the difference between a confused bee and an angry bee, and so when you stop the hole with a cone, the bees start circling and the home owner panics. Usually by the time I get back they have sprayed them. This has happened the MAJORITY of the times I've done a cone removal.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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