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Thread: Xmas present

  1. #1

    Post

    Last Tuesday was fairly warm and I went to check the hives. The two stronger hives were very active so I decided to inspect the more active one. Much to my surprize, there were several frames with about 25% capped brood and 10% larva. Not having seen any brood for the past couple months, I didn't expect any until Feb. since our winter is just beginning (Santa Lucia mountains in CA, 20 miles west of Paso Robles). Looking around, I noticed the manzinita (sp?) trees nearby were bloomimg and the trees were buzzing with bees. Unfortunately, it was late in the day and the next day was rainy, so I didn't get a chance to inspect the other hives.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    My observatin hive reared a batch of brood starting at the end of November. You could see open brood by Dec 3. They have let it all emerge without starting another batch yet.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    Just before Christmas, we had 2 dandelions bloom
    in the yard in the mountains of Virginia. Hard
    to say if this was the last gasp of fall, the
    first sign of a very early spring, or merely the
    transient effects of a warm spell.

    Now that the days are getting longer, just about
    any hive could have a small patch of brood. But
    brood in NOVEMBER and DECEMBER?? That's a queen
    that I would replace ASAP in a production hive.
    Nothing eats through stores like brood raising
    at inappropriate times.

    Sure hope you don't plan on breeding from that
    queen!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    I don't plan on breeding from her, but they just raised a small patch and then quit. Considering the small number of bees in the obseration hive, and the moderate temps in the hive (since it's in my living room), they may have made the right choice. Now there are still only a few more bees but they are nice young bees. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,540

    Big Grin

    Michael

    I think you should raise some from her and sell them as "year round layers for OB hives"
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  6. #6

    Post

    Jim:

    I am new to beekeeping, but I am not sure I agree with you. Being in CA, when wet weather hits, that is the time things start growing and the hills/valleys are currently turning green. Fruit/nut trees will be blooming within a couple months and I would think a strong hive would be desirable. Having a queen that starts laying early (late Dec) should produce a strong hive by then.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > I am new to beekeeping, but I am not sure
    > I agree with you. Being in CA...

    Oh yeah, California in "winter" is a whole
    different thing from NEBRASKA in winter.

    If you can get your queens laying a decent
    amount of eggs before the solstice in CA,
    good for you. I was addressing only a "four seasons" environment, like Mike's.

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