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Thread: Oxalic acid

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Is Oxalic acid better then the strips, it looks like their is no resistance to it yet? is this an approved treatment? Realy dont like to many chemicals in the brood or body! Will this work on both types of mites inside and out?

  2. #2
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    The Europeans use it as the main control for Varroa. They are several years ahead of us on resistance to Apistan etc.

    I have not been able to find actual research that says the oxalic acid vapor kills the tracheal mites, but several people have said it does and it would make some sense. But the best thing for T-mites is bees that resist them. I doubt that trickling would do anything to the T-mites.

    It is not approved as an insecticide. I beleive there are probably some kind of limits on it in food since a) it naturally occurs in food and b) an excess of it is not good for you. It does already occur in the honey.

    Several people are working for some kind of interim approval based on the research already done in Europe, but they are only working on approval of the trickling method. It seems like the vapor is more effective, less hard on the bees and, according to Axtman, it's where they were ten years ago and they have moved on to vapor now.

    The other issue is, as I understand it, if you are using something for a pesticide that is not contaminating your honey and is not labled as a pesticide then you are not violating the label. You're in a bit of a gray area. If, on the other hand, a pesticide label exists for it that says, for example that you can use oxalic acid to trickle, then if you vaporize you will be in violation of that label and therefore in direct violation of the law. Not a gray area anymore.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
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    May 2005
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    You could also google for rhubarb poisoning.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  4. #4
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    O/A is an organic acid. It's a more "natural" chemical because it's found in many foods including, I think, honey. By strips I assume you mean Apistan. This IS a chemical, Fluvalinate, and is used throughtout agriculture to kill pests.

    Checkmite+ is coumaphos and is an nerve toxin. It's the "hardest" chemical in use.

    Apilife-Var, Formic Acid, O/a, and Sucricide are all softer materials.

    Dickm

  5. #5
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    Jul 2005
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    I have noticed that Canada has approved both the solution and vapourized methods.
    Mike I am all ready using Cariolans with a Cariolan/Russian queen should be fairly thachel resistant.
    Halk Why would i feed rhubarb Yack!!! to the BeZZZZZZZZ?

    Thanks Every One

  6. #6

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    Oxalic acid is a poison, causes Kidney damage. It is found in high concentrations in rhubarb leaves. I think, but am not sure, it is broken down by high heat (as in cooking). Personally, I find it hard to believe you would want to use it on hives since it can contaminate the honey and the honey is not heated significantly in processing and I would not buy honey if I knew oxalic acid had been used to treat the hive. Just my 2 cents...

  7. #7
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    GDH,
    Tests do not support your 2 cents. Almost everything is a poison in concentration. O/A IS a poison to the mites. And it can be a danger to the applicator. Most of us would prefer not to use anything. That position tends to soften with a 90% die-off rate.

    Dickm

  8. #8
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    >it can contaminate the honey

    The research seems to show that there is no measurable increase in the oxalic acid in honey over what naturally occurs in honey already. You're "contaminating" it with something that is already there in the honey in amounts that fall in the range of what naturally occurs.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
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    As far as I can tell no one in their right mind enjoys the use of any chemicals, but it sure looks like alot of bee keepers are using far to many chemicals, just to get an end product Honey, wax, mead ect. Bees are live stock just like cattle, sheep, pigs, chickins, the fewer the chemicals we put in them the less we put in ourselves. Better we manage our stock with as few chemicals {the bear minumin needed} the better off we all are!

  10. #10
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    Evansville, IN, USA
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    splash . . .
    >Better we manage our stock with as few chemicals {the bear minumin needed} the better off we all are!

    Can you offer some tips!

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    >Better we manage our stock with as few chemicals {the bear minumin needed} the better off we all are!

    I agree. I would prefer nothing added to the hive at all. But I still see a big difference between things like Organophosphates that are manmade nerve toxins and organic acids that are already in our food INCLUDING honey.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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