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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    Hi I am going remove a hive it a "Y" shaped tree and the bees built the nest where the two branches meet the hive is about five feet from the ground. What are some methods for removing a hive in this position? I heard about filling it with water.

    Joseph
    jtjrson@aol.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Joseph:

    You wrote:
    I am going remove a hive it a "Y" shaped tree and the bees built the nest where the two branches meet the hive is about five feet from the ground. What are some methods for removing a hive in this position? I heard about filling it with water.

    Reply:
    You fill the hole with water and you will kill all the brood and a lot of live bees also, but I guess you would get a lot of adults and maybe the queen if lucky.

    Is there no way to get into the hole and remove some drawn comb and workerbrood and mount into swarm ketching frames? Then place into a super and use saving all you can?

    sincerely,

    Dee A. Lusby



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Pensacola, Fla
    Posts
    55

    Post

    Joe: I would seriously consider using the wire screen method of removing the bees if you have not already begun working with them. Make a cone of screen wire large enough on one end to cover the hole where the bees are entering the tree. The other end should be no larger then about a 1/4 inch. Set a five frame neuc as near the entrance as possible drill a 1/2 -3/4 hole in the neuc and feed the screen wire cone in to the heuc. Prepare the neuc: put several frames of brood and eggs no older than one or two days( a frame with a queen cell is best)in the neuc along with the bees on the frames. The bees will exit the tree through the neuc and on returning will not be able to get back in the tree. Eventuall all the bees will have exited the hive and after several weeks, even the queen will abandon the tree. When you no longer see any bees tring to exit the tree remove the screen wire stirr up the comb in the tree if possible and the bees will rob out the honey. I have done this many times and it seldom fails. Roy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    the hole in the tree is facing up, and it would bee almost impossible to get inside the hive unless I could take down the tree, also the tree has about a 31/2' diameter with almost no room to put a nuc and cone, I will try your screen cone method if I get another call.
    I allready went to the tree and with my experence I could not do anything take the hive out.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    I had a similar problem, but it was an old house. I used the cone method, I had nowhere to put a nuc. I logged on Ohio State agriculture? and it said put a queenright nuc near the cone. Thats what I did, but during the day, there were bees everywhere, but at night, they settled into the nuc. Just be sure the nuc is weak, and has brood. As time went on, (3 weeks), I seemed to pretty well emptied the nest. I also relocated some of the captured bees along the way. The only thing that was bad, is they brought chalkbrood with them. I solved that problem, and started a new hive. All those bees are probably dead now, but the hive perks on!
    Dale

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Exclamation

    I forgot to add my original thought! Anyway, back to nuc placement. The hole in the side of the house was 5 feet as well. I took 5 empty brood chambers, and placed the nuc entrance about 1 foot from the cone exit.
    The cone should be straight, or point up slightly. I had mine pointed down slightly, because I was in a hurry, and the first bees got stuck inside of it. Once I pointed it the other way, they exited just fine. Once the go forage, everything is fine, but when they return, they get grumpy! They will try very hard to get back in, but once darkness comes, they settled into they nuc. I suspect that when daylight comes around, they start round two of trying to get in, but eventually, you will see captured bees beginning to forage from the nuc.
    Now, I was a little dumb about the captured ones. I decided to put a queen cell in the second nuc, that I emptied the captured ones into in the beginning. The first nuc, at the sight will fill up quickly in the beginning, level out, and refill quickly again, as new brood emerges, and eventually leaves the nest. I emptied the older bees into the second nuc, probably 2 pounds, and when the new queen took the mating flight, so did the bees! I lost about 2 pounds. I think even if there were brood in that nuc, they would have absconded anyway, because they were so confused. Oh well, live and learn. Anyway, the rest I managed to keep, probably another 2 pounds, and they are good.

    I was surprised the amount of bees living in the wall of the house. I did not think there was enough room in there. Now, like I said before, I did not let them go back for the honey, because of the chalkbrood problem. Also. I picked up wax worm eggs from there also. Trapping bees sounds all well and good, but there are definite problems associated when doing so!

    Dale...

    ------------------
    Dale Richards

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    Tahnks, for your info and replies!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,630

    Post

    I'm glad someone has had success with the cone method. I have not unless I remove the bees to a distant location every night. If you can find all of the entrances, and you can block the minor ones and put the cone on the major one you can use a bee vac (see directions here or buy one from Brushy Mt bee farm) I just vacumn them up and take them to an empty hive a couple of miles or more away from the tree that has a new caged queen and keep dumping the bees in every day until there are almost none at the old location. Then if you have a really strong hive, you can put it out front of the tree and they will probably rob it out. This has always worked for me. If, of course, you could get to it you might be able to do better.

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