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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Osceola, Iowa south central of state
    Posts
    248

    Post

    Ok iddee, that makes sence to me during the honey flow and after swarming season, but according to books I have read, reversing the deeps helps keep them from swarming and builds up the brood faster in spring. I even say a video that said you might need to reverse them 2 or 3 times before the flow.

    Also, my hive deffenately eat the honey in the lower brood box first till it was empty, then moved up to the top.

    Well, I sure hope I have not hurt my bees by doing this. Will have to watch it closely and let you all know. I am sure that it is a good idea, but not so sure the timing was good.

    Bill

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    And now for the rest of the story, as Paul Harvey would say.

    I'm just a hobbyist bkper of 30 years or so. Not a scientist. Take my ideas with a grain of salt.
    As someone's tagline says, ask two bkpers and get three answers. This is just the way I have always viewed it and it has seemed to work.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    McGraw,NY,USA
    Posts
    580

    Post

    Interesting thread ! Living in central NY the weather here isnt dependable enough for me to rotate the hive bodies. I have always done that to give the queen room to lay eggs upward. Also to hopefully keep the brood chamber from becoming honey bound which to my understanding is why they tend to build swarm cells. As I understand it the queens arent laying fast enough at this time to run into the problem of her running out of room to lay . However when she does go into high gear I`d like to depress any tendancy to swarm.
    That said I have also heard/ read somewhere that a laying queen cannot lay fast enough to fill ten frames of brood (both sides) without some of the brood hatching before she gets the box full.
    I will continue to rotate (usually in mid april) mostly out of habit and when I decide which hives are going to be split and which might need to be requeened.
    LOL I believe I have come full circle...just trying to do right by my bees ...Rick Alexander
    Turn stumbling blocks into stepping stones

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    chilliwack, bc
    Posts
    660

    Post

    one thing about reversing is not to do it to early especially to weaker (6 frames or less)hives. when the bees in the top box are all the way across and it becomes warm enough then it's probably the best time to reverse, it's like giving a strong colony a super then. if it's to cool, remember warm air rises and a lot of heat and energy from the bees will be wasted trying to make up for that lost heat if it's still getting cold at nights.
    Will Gruenwald Chilliwack BC

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Post

    You guys are really confusing me. I never reversed boxes until this year because when I went in, the bees were still in the bottom box with lots of nectar/honey above. This year I found the bottom boxes of two of the five hives I checked on Thursday totally empty, so I reversed. So now the brood is in the bottom box with honey/pollen overhead. I also understand from what I've read that in 2 weeks I'm supposed to reverse them again. Is this all wrong?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,370

    Post

    When I rotate supers the bees are usually real close to the tops of the frames, with little honey above them.

    I'm more concerned with the small patch of brood in the frames of the lower super than I am about honey binding. But I'm not really worried about either.

    At this time of year in South Carolina, especially with the warm weather, giving the strong colonies more room is necessary. So, doing that by rotating supers is my chosen method.

    I did that rotation on February 24, 25 and 27th. Then I went off to Columbus, GA to see Charles graduate from Army Boot Camp.

    When I checked them again a week later, I put a third deep on many of them. I'm sure that this is too early for some, but being 1,000 miles away, when home, I can't do what needs to be done at the exactly correct time.

    I can't even do that when they are close by, so I just do what I can when I can and hope for the best. It usually averages out on the plus side.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    Welcome home Mark.

    [size="1"][ March 11, 2006, 10:00 AM: Message edited by: Joel ][/size]

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    Fordguy,
    You ask: If I don't reverse then I don't have to Checkerboard?

    The intended purpose of checkerboarding as Walt discribes it is to manipulate the nectar stores in a way that will prevent swarming. (Walt now calls the technique Nectar Management; checkerboarding is the manipulation.) It is completely separate from hive-reversing, with the exception that you might reverse to give yourself empty frames to use for Nectar Management.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Osceola, Iowa south central of state
    Posts
    248

    Post

    Thanks for clarifing that Waya

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