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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Osceola, Iowa south central of state
    Posts
    248

    Post

    Well, it was 60 today and for the first time, I saw them bring in a little pollin. I don't know where in the world they found it, but they had it.

    I went ahead and reversed deeps while it was warm and there were hardly any bees in the bottom. A couple frams full of honey and maybe 1 full of pollin in the bottom was all there was. I did not open the top one but it was heavy. Did not think there were more than 4 or 5 frames of bees though.

    I also started feeding bee pro today. Not sure I needed it but am trying to get them to build up now so I can split in April sometime. Have been feeding 1/1 but they don't seem to really want it. Gues they have plenty of stores. they were very gentle so I am sure the queen is there, however I did not see her.

    Has anyone else reversed deeps yet up here in the north? I am in Iowa.
    Bill

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Osceola, Iowa south central of state
    Posts
    248

    Post

    Oh another thing, I put on my screened bottom board to day. The main reason I did it was because my old bottom board would not allow me to put in the board to check of mites. So I put in that also. Is it too early if it gets cold in the nights to check for mites? Do I need to leave it in longer when they are balled up inside?

    Bill

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >Do I need to leave it in longer when they are balled up inside?

    I'd leave it for a week and don't expect too many mites this time of year. Hopefully [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,791

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    Bill, I reversed deeps in South Carolina over a week ago. But it seems a little early to me for you to do that in Iowa. Is that southern Iowa? Here in NY we have some snow and ice still. maybe we could reverse here in about 3 or 4 weeks. If the colonies are suitably large. I was kinda leary about reversing some of the colonies in SC. But with the current weather I'm hoping I erred correctly more so than not.

    Good luck.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    Hey welcome back Mark, how'd the bees look?

    OH, just saw the other thread. Guess they come through winter pretty much ok.

    [size="1"][ March 10, 2006, 04:34 PM: Message edited by: George Fergusson ][/size]
    Dulcius ex asperis

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,791

    Post

    What were left did, pretty much.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    I couldn't understand last summer when everyone talked about the brood nest being honey bound. Now I understand. Since I have never reversed the brood boxes, I have never honey bound my hives. Since they stored the honey from the top down last year and ate upward during the winter, the top layer of the top box is solid honey. So you reverse it to honey bound the hive so you can practice the checkerboard method. Is that correct?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,791

    Post

    iddee, I reverse deep brood super positions to give the queen more room without adding supers. When i get back to SC, in a couple of weeks, I should have lots of brood to make splits with.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Posts
    103

    Post

    be careful when you reverse the brood boxes that you don't split up the brood nest. If the nest is on the top of the bottom box and continues into the bottom of the upper box, you will be creating a huge gap between the two sections of brood and there may not be enough bees to keep two sections of brood warm.
    Checked my hives Tuesday and all hives wintered successfully so as a reward I gave them each a criso patty and some beepro. Here in this part of Canada, it will be awhile before the temps are warm enough to feed syrup or unwrap.
    sterlingc

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

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    Mark, in my opinion, the queen is going anywhere in the hive where her attendants prepare cells for laying. I don't see where reversing the boxes does anything other than putting the remaining layer of solid honey in the center when looking vertically, thus causing the hive to be honey bound. Before reversing, the queen will start laying at the height they quit eating during the winter and lay downward from there. An empty box under the brood chamber would be equal to supering on the top for the honey. I can't see putting the queen's laying space up, nor the honey supers down.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wausau Wi
    Posts
    311

    Post

    iddee, are you saying that you don't gain much when you reverse the hive in the spring ? I had thought about doing it, and now I'm wondering if I should. Marla Spivak from U of Minn. does it with their hives. They have a whole system down for doing it. I would like your opinion on this. I'm trying to get different thoughts on it.

    ------------------------------------
    I live for H-bees
    Everything happens for a reason. Time heals all wounds - time and a half heals them even faster

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
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    1,443

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    iddee, I never know whether you are kidding or not, and most of the time you leave me just confused, probably a good reason for me to stay in the 101 forum

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
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    OK iddee, maybe the burden is on me to try and find the nugget in what you said - are you saying that if we don't reverse boxes, that we would not need to checkerboard?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Osceola, Iowa south central of state
    Posts
    248

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    I reverse so the nest in on the bottom again. They work up during the winter and mine were all in the top box with no bees in the bottom at all. But the top was pretty much full so now they will have the top to move up to and raise brood. If left on top, the bees feel crowded even though they have lots of room on the bottom. At least that is what I have been told by several people and it makes sence to me.

    My bottom box was nearly empty of anything in the comb except on the 2 outside frames were full of honey and the next two outside ones had a lot of pollin, otherwise all combs were empty.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wausau Wi
    Posts
    311

    Post

    thankyou Bill, hmmmm....interesting and makes good sense.
    Everything happens for a reason. Time heals all wounds - time and a half heals them even faster

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
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    5,080

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    Don't even consider whether you have 2 boxes or 6 boxes. Look at it as 1 hive. In a hive, the bees will draw comb from the top down. They will fill honey from the top downward. The queen will lay under the dome of honey. As more honey comes in, they will store it in the upper cells where the older brood is emerging from. The queen will be below the emerging brood, the capped brood, the open brood, and into the open cells where the workers will either clean cells or draw wax for her to lay in. This continues until fall. When the honey flow ceases, they begin to eat at the dome of honey. If, during the winter, they get to the top of the dome, they starve. If they do not get to the top of the dome of honey before spring, then they survive and when the flow starts, they store it in the upper cells, 21 days behind the queen's egg laying, or as the brood emerges. The queen continues being pushed down during the flow, until she is at the bottom board, or you add space.At the end of the flow, they again begin to eat toward the top.

    Now, if all are in the top, with a dome of honey over them, and you reverse them, than the scene is: from bottom to top, eggs, open brood, capped brood, honey dome which the queen does not want to cross, and then the empty space. Above her and the honey, not below, where she wants to lay.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wausau Wi
    Posts
    311

    Post

    ok I'm with you iddee
    Everything happens for a reason. Time heals all wounds - time and a half heals them even faster

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
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    yes, that makes a lot of sense, but what about checkerboarding? same question, are you saying if you don't reverse, you don't have to checkerboard?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
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    I don't know about checkerboarding, but have done it when the honey dome has reached the bottom box and they have no further to go. I would either extract the upper box and put it back on, or add another box, then checkerboard, in order to break the honey dome.

    I haven't studied the checkerboard, but like the concept for times when the honey dome is too low in the hive. The queen does not like to go across the honey dome to find a place to lay. The checkerboard relieves that necessity.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,443

    Post

    when the honey dome reaches the bottom, adding a box to the bottom would fix that wouldn't it?

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