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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    YANCEY CO., NC
    Posts
    639

    Post

    the hive that I lost last week is being robbed by my other hive they both had about 30lb of honey left my question is with me feeding for brood and them stocking up on the other hive is there A chance of them getting honey bound and should I shut up the dead hive.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    I would just set the honey from the dead hive on the live hive.
    Then only your bees will get it and not the bees from the neighborhood. Also, it will give them the room they need to expand.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Temecula, CA
    Posts
    147

    Post

    I wouldn't let them rob it out unless you inspect it for disease first. Why do you think they died?

    It's probably similar in most states, in this state if deadouts are not sealed they can be considered a nuisance. See below:


    >>Agr 1803.02 Exposed Equipment.

    (a) The following procedures shall be followed for any apiary equipment exposed to flying honeybees:

    (1) No honey, cappings, apiary equipment or appliances shall be exposed to flying bees so as to become a source of nuisance or contamination; and

    (2) In any apiary in which a colony or colonies of bees have died, the owner or person in charge or possession shall securely close the entrance or entrances to the hive of such colony or colonies so that other bees cannot obtain honey therefrom.<<

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    YANCEY CO., NC
    Posts
    639

    Post

    They starved last week within inches of honey.Two weeks of 38degrees or below cold.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >Two weeks of 38degrees or below cold.

    Sorry about your hive. I guess everything really is relative. My bees are out flying anytime the temperature gets above 30 degrees, just to get some exercise. They haven't seen anything like 38 degrees since late December. It's 7 degrees out now.

    Did your bees have brood? Mine probably don't have any brood yet.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    George

    you're absolutely right, it's all relative to your location
    around here we've had a problem with the early winter being so warm the bees never shut down and then in Feb it actually turned into winter
    I don't know about ken but mine are full of brood
    you folks up north deal with a different set of "issues"

    Dave

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >you folks up north deal with a different set of "issues"

    Yup. I have to smile when people talk about 38 degree "cold snaps" because I've been waiting for temperatures that warm for two months! However, losing hives is no laughing matter. Ironically, my bees are relatively safe and secure as long as the temperature remains generally *cold* enough to keep them clustered and not rearing brood, and it doesn't really matter if it's 10 below zero or 10 above as long as it warms up enough periodically so they can move around the hive and get out and poop.

    Now that spring is threatening (?) the bees will be starting to think about raising brood which puts them at risk of starvation. It's tragic to successfully bring hives through the deep of winter only to have them die with honey 3" away in March or April because they got stranded covering brood.

    Last December and early January we too had abnormally warm weather- the bees were out collecting corn dust from our bird feeders and coffee grounds from our compost heap on New Years day. I resisted the urge to encourage them. I'm glad I did and I'm glad they resisted the urge to start raising brood. Somehow they knew it was just a fluke and that Real Winter(tm) was yet to come.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    George,
    I've never looked this early but I'm willing to bet that we have brood now in the center of the cluster. That's why they starve about now.

    Dickm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >I'm willing to bet that we have brood now

    You're probably right. A little bit. I hope they hold off wholesale brood rearing for another month.
    Dulcius ex asperis

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