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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Boynton Beach, Florida, USA
    Posts
    278

    Post

    Hi,

    Has any tried the old BManglers top secret ingredient in their pollen substitute? Any successes, failures, improvements?

    Check out the feeding attractant at: http://wind.prohosting.com/tbhguy/bee/subs.htm

    Regards
    topbarguy
    living in a land of snow and ice which is about 2 months behind those of you in good beekeeping areas

    [This message has been edited by topbarguy (edited August 07, 2004).]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    Yes. I made some splits in the last few weeks (pulling brood from colonies, hoping to control swarming), letting them raise their own queens. Gave them all patties with Bee-pro, no pollen (didn't have any), honey and sugar water, along with the secret ingredient. Patties disappeared rapidly. Last year the same patties without the secret ingredient dried out before they were consumed.

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I haven't made any this year yet, still using what I had left over from last year. Last year I used it in everything I made. I put it in patties, both pollen and grease, and in my syrup. I also mixed in a little mineral salt too.

  4. #4
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    It works, and, to my knowledge, has no
    downside.

    Here's MY "secret ingredient" for pollen
    patties, which works even better, and is
    free in large quantities:

    Real Pollen


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    169

    Cool

    Wow! Who knew! Yes, I suppose REAL pollen would be best....but when you don't have any...

    Martha

  6. #6
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    So, in what ratio is the vitamin C mixed in?
    JG

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

    Post

    >Here's MY "secret ingredient" for pollen
    patties, which works even better, and is
    free in large quantities:

    >Real Pollen

    Well, it's free if you have a pollen trap. Pretty expensive if you don't. That's what I use as my secret ingredient too. The bees love it. They also raise a lot of really healthy brood on it.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    MB and all,
    I am going to try and purchase a pollen trap. Do you dry or freeze the pollen for use next year or maybe even do both?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

    Post

    I freeze it. It does not keep well at room temperature.

  10. #10

    Post

    This is very cool or should I say C. I like to experiment like this how did you come up with the idea to use vitamin C?

  11. #11
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    Yes, freezing the pollen is required.

    As for pollen traps, I have a great
    fondness for Lloyd Spear's "Sundance"
    hive-bottom pollen traps. They are
    not the cheapest you can buy, but you
    get what you pay for.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

    Post

    Acutally you don't always "get what you pay for". It is quite simple to overpay. You do, however, have to pay for what you get. I've heard good things about the Sundance trap and the old pollen traps from the late '70s I have around here seem to match the description of how they work.

    If you use any pollen trap you'll have a major traffic jam for a couple of days and you also have to open it up every few days to let pollen in the hive.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    My main thought was that if I could collect enough when it is plentiful to stimulate and help brood rearing that it would pay for itself. So one said if you have a 3/4 inch hole drill for an upper exit that the drone can use it as well as some pollen get in. This allows the trap to be on longer peroids of time. I have not tried but heard this. A busy strong colony would not be able to use the hole as the only entrance. I do have a couple people asking about fresh pollen for allergy and health reasons. Both are currently buying it in capsules.

    So how much pollen can a large hive collect a day?

    And what price does fresh pollen bring if you know?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    Question. If pollen won't keep unless it's frozen, how do the bees preserve it?

    Dickm

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

    Post

    >Question. If pollen won't keep unless it's frozen, how do the bees preserve it?

    They pack it in a cell mixed with honey and it still looses some of its nutrition over time.

  16. #16
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    > If you use any pollen trap you'll have a major
    > traffic jam for a couple of days and you also
    > have to open it up every few days to let pollen
    > in the hive.

    Well, I run a dozen pollen traps from late June
    onwards, and I have found:

    a) That the Sundance traps make the others look
    like junk. (Yes, I've tried them all by now.)

    b) That pollen traps are designed to knock ONE
    of two balls of pollen off the bee, and while
    it certainly does reduce pollen delivered per
    sortie, the bees are able to make more pollen
    foraging sorties per day, or recruit more bees
    as pollen foragers. That said, I would NEVER
    deploy pollen traps during spring build-up,
    for obvious reasons.

    c) After the main nectar flows, one might as well
    trap pollen, just to keep the bees busy and
    doing something "productive". The "late June
    early July" nectar dearth period is a great time
    to use them.

    d) The "traffic jam" is not so bad. When I put a
    pollen trap on the bottom board, the entrance
    is still where it was before - on the bottom
    board. If I "open" the trap, the entrance is
    moved a mere 4 inches above where it was, and
    the bees are making "perfect aircraft carrier
    landings" within hours. This is much less
    confusion than removing top entrances, removing
    Imrie shims, and other changes to alternate
    entrances further away from the "main" entrance.

    e) The only time I "open" the traps is when I go out
    of town for more than a 2-day period, and cannot
    get someone to empty the traps for me. You want
    to empty the traps every evening, or the pollen
    will degrade, attract wax moths, and otherwise
    become less valuable.

    f) Pollen added to bread dough makes a tasty loaf.
    Pollen on oatmeal is very good.
    Wild rose pollen tastes just like rose-petal jelly.

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